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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 18, 1922 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-01-18

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY WEDNESDA

Shtiiigau i "atl

V

OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER O THE UNIVEISTY
OF MICHIGAN
Published every msorning except Monday during the Waiver-
sity year by the Board in Control of Studeat Publications.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED P138
i Aacciateo Prs is excively entitled to the wse for
republication of all news dispatches credited to it or not oterwis
credited in this papr and tht local news published therein.
Entered at the postofaice at An Arbr, Michigan, as secod
elass matter.
Subscription by carrier or mail, f 5.
Offices:Ann Arbr'Press building, Maynard Street.
Phones: Business, 96o; Editorial, 2414.
Communications not to exceed 300 words, if signed, the sig-
nature not necessarily to appear in print, but as an evidence of
faith, and- notices of events will be published in The Daily at the
discretion of the Editor, if left at or mailed to The Dai office.
Unsigned ommunications will receive no consideration. No man
ncript will be returned unless the writer incloses postage.
The Daily does 'not necessarily endorse the sentiments e-
pressed in the communications.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
MANAGING EDITOR .......... BREWSTER P. CAMPBELL
Assistant Managing Editor..................Hugh W. Hitchcock
City Editor .................................. E. P. Lovey. Jr
Night Editors-
R. E. Adams G. P. Overten
John P. Dawson M. B. Stal
E*ward Lambrecht Paul Wtzel
Editorial Beard Chairman...............L. Armstrong Kern
Assistants-
Leo Hershdorfer 1. R. Meiss
Sunday Magazine Editor.............Thornton W. Sargent, Jr.
Exchange Editor.................................George E. Sloan
Music Editor.................................Sidney B. Coates
Sporting Editor ................................ George Reindel
Women's Editor ............................. Elizabeth Vickery
Humor Editor ...;,............................. E R. Meiss
Assistants
Kingsley S. Andersson L. L. Fenwick B. H. Lee
Maurice Berman Dorothy G. Geltz Robert M. Loeb
Cecil R. Betron H. B. Grundy J. E. Mack
Jack D. Briscoe Sadyebeth Heath Kathrine Montgomery
R. B. Butler Winona A. Hibbard R. C. Moriarty
R.N. Byers Harry D. Hoe F. . Pontius
A. D. Clark Agnes Holmquist Lillian Scher
Harry C. Clark H. E. Howlett R. B. Tarr
'J] P. Comstock Marion Kerr Virginia Tryon
RobertW. Cooper L. S. Kerr Dot"Whipple
Evely.n J. Couglin M. A. Kaver L. L. Yost
John P. Dawson Victor W. Klein J. B. Young
H. A. Donahue Marion Koch
W. F. Elliott George E. Lardner
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
BUSINESS MANAGER ............. VERNON F. HILLERY
Advertising.......... ........F. M. Heath, A. J. Parker
Publication ............................. Nathan W. Robertson
Accounts .................................. John J. Hamels, Jr.
Circulation .................................. Herold C. Hunt
Assistants
Burr L. Robbins Richard Cutting H. Willis Heidbreder
W. Cooley James Prentiss W. Kenneth Galbraith
L. Beaumont Parks Maurice Mole J. A. Dryer
Walter Scherer iitin Goldring Richard Heidemann
Edw. Murane Tyler Stevens T. H. Welfe
David Park Paul Blum
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 18, 1922
Night Editor-JOHN P. DAWSON
Assistant B. H. Lee, Jr.
Proofreaders-J. Briscoe
J. P. Comstock
It was found necessary to postpone the regular
meeting of the editorial staff and tryouts which
was to have been held yesterday afternoon. The
staff will meet at 5 o'clock today in the Press build-
ing.
THE TRACK FAN'S LAMENT
Coach Farell is up a stump. He has been need-
ing men for sometime, and he still needs them. The
track material is here - we cannot doubt that fact.
But so far the turn-out for training and practice is
deplorably small.
Probably the imminence of the examination
period causes many a man of athletic tendencies to
absent himself from the gymnasium; probably the
argument that work is too heavy serves many as
an excuse to stay away from Trainer Hahn, and no
doubt a large number are strictly honest with them-
selves in taking such an attitude. In this connec-
tion, however, we are led to wonder what justi-
fication the situation has to offer for itself. We find
iembers of all schools and colleges on the campus
turning out daily to work on the various publica-
tions, to help at the Union, and to do countless
other everlasting little jobs hereabouts, and we are
just stupid enough to feel that, if these fellows can
spare the time to do other than college work, the
athlete can also. In fact, we are so cynically in-
clined that we would ask just how much time the
fast-legged little fellow or the big-boned strong man

wastes in lounging, in general meanderings, or in
theater rushing.
Coach Farrell is up a stump. We do not mean
to infer that he has given up, simply because he
lacks material. Far from it; "Steve" is not that
kind of a man. But we do mean to indicate very
strongly that, if Michigan does not turn out and
give the coach the material he needs, then something
is radically wrong with the whole bloomin' lot of us.
OUR UTILITARIAN CAMPUS
When the thinkers of thirty years ago suggested
the potentialities of the University for immense
expansion, little did they calculate upon the vast
proportions which the present building program
may give to the Michigan of the near future. The
enlargement now in process undoubtedly surpasses
their fondest hopes.
It is possible, however, that in one respect the
present plans do not coincide with the dreams oft
long ago. Gleaming spires, slender gothics, grace-
ful buttresses, and rich carvings, may have soft-
ened that picture of the future Michigan, - an'
Oxford or a Princeton on a vaster scale. Roman-
ticism, atmosphere, inspiration, proper surround-
ings for the spiritual uplift of the student may have
entered their visions. They thought of college as
a place different from the rest of the world. a place
where certain chosen few go to lead four isolated
years of study and play.
But times have changed. Higher education is
swiftly becoming the rule rather than the excep-
tion, and college, instead of being kept tit a separate

tent and labelled "side show", has been incorporated
into the main ring of life. Besides this evolution,
the twentieth century has brought with it an in-
creasing utilitarian viewpoint and a mania for effi-
ciency in every phase of existence.
The architecture of Michigan's new buildings
above all else will be practical. -A uniform plan of
simplicity and utilitarianism will greet the return-
ing alumnus in years to come. No spires, no curly-
queues, no curves of grace, will play upon the emo-
tions of the future Michigan student, but instead,
square, solid, simple and rational structures will
throw conventional shadows before him, and re-
mind him that he is in a conventional place of learn-
ing, an important unit in the whole of a conven-
tional civilization.
The realms of the endowed universities, it seems,
lie in the romantic; those of the state universities in
the rational. Whether or not Michigan's practical
building plan is the most to be desired remains a
question. But it is gratifying to know that the
Michigan of ten years hence will not present the
patchwork of varied architecture so characteristic
of the present campus.
CONDUCIVE TO SWEARING
Buzzing drones, incessantly muttering incoherent
nothings; ambitious minstrels, banging and twang-
ing away at tin-stringed hickeydoodles ; citizens of
Utopia, building castles amid clouds of blue, blind-
ing smoke - assemble all these in one room, and
the absorption of knowledge becomes a truly im-
possible problem.
An occasional student therefore makes his way
betimes to what he considers a haven of rest and
quiet, where the muses dwell and scholars feast
their souls ; the Rhetoric library. The seat of learn-
in, as he enters, is found to be occupied by numer-
ous pedagogues. A friendly atmosphere pervades
the pinchy room. Instructors and assistants, gaily
chattering with one another or with the librarian,
and exchanging merry quips among themselves
from time to time. A lively argument is begun,
and culminates in a long and friendly group dis-
cussion. The air is charged with pedagogic pleas-
antry.
But what of the student, with the curse of edu-.
cation following him with unrelenting vigil? Within
a short time he closes his books, the contents of
which he has scanned perhaps, but has not absorbed,
dons his coat and hat, buckles his galoshes, and,
with learning tucked away under his arm, stamps
out of the room and down the stairs, much to the
disgust of the instructors. The seeker after knowl-
edge has gone back to the realm of minstrelsy, there
to plug his non-essential ears and gaze upon the re-
treating muse through a smoke screen.
Present efforts, not future groans, are the most
effectual bullets to use in puncturing the anatomy
of that nine-lived examination bugaboo.
If the excess of newspaper scandal evident nowa-
days is "any goterion to cry by", it must be almost
as dangerous to live indoors in Detroit and Chicago
as it is to cross State street in Ann Arbor.
Where, oh where are all the athletes?
Tie Telescope
HORACE
Book i Ode XX
This clear white mountain brew shall be
The only booze you'll get from me -
And little enough o' that.
Beneath the eaves, in a copper still
I made the stuff -taste if you will. ... .
And on that very eve
The first-night boys from far and near
Gathered your bed-room farce to hear
And your leading dame to see.
And how they laughed when the bride awoke
And found beside her a drunken soak
She'd never seen before........ .
I know your cellar bravely boasts
Of wine and whisky fit for the toasts
Of Bacchus himself.

From me you'll get no Johnny Walker,
But gee, I hope you are no talker
Who'll snitch upon my still.
- Coo-Cooed.

-REDUCTIONS -ON ALL=
-O S
- r
- w.
Is w
w w
GRAHAM'S Both Stores

DETROIT UNITED LINES
Ann Arbor and Jackson
TIME TABLE
(Eastern Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Express Can - 6:oo
. M., 7:oo a. m., 8:oo a. m., 9:00 a. m. and
:curly to 9:05 p. Mn.
Jackson ExraessCars (ocal stops of Ann
\r:or)*9:47 a. m. and every two hours to
~:47 p. im.
Local Cars East Bound-5.:5 a.m., 7:oo a.
n. and every two hours to 9 :oo p. m., zx.oo
,. m. To Ypsilanti only- 1:4o p. m., 12:25
;. in., I:15 a. mn.
To Saline, change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars West Bound-7:5. a. m., 2:49
To Jackson and Kalamazoo-Limited cars:
t :47, 10 :47, a. mn., 12:47, 2.47, 4:47"
To Jackson and Lansing - Limited: 8:47
Irn.
922 JANUARY 1922
S M T W T F S
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
8 9 10 11 12 13 14
15 14 17 18 19 50 21
22 23 24 25 26 27 8
29 0 S1
NOTICE TO MEN
We do all kinds of high-class Rat
.work at pre-war prices. Hats turned
nside out, with all new trimmings.
cre as good as new.
FACTORY HAT STORE
617 PACKARD STREET
Telephone 1792

THE

66Y99

INN

AT LANE HALL

Same high quality of food. Lower prices.
Good music 5:30-6:30 every evening
IMPORTED SPRING MATERIALS JUST ARRIVED
The New Changeable Organdle
Embroidered Organdies, Voiles, Linens, Pongees and many other
materials to select from

--WE ALSO DESIGN AND MAKE GOWNS---

TIE WISTERIA SHOP
S330 Maynard Street

Ladies"SkatingBreeches
in Wool, Corduroy, Serge, etc. Although designed for skating you will find these garments to be also comfort-
able and practical for coasting, driving and other winter sports. We have a large assortment to select from.
Also sport hose, puttees and SKATING BOOTS. Knit Coats, Blankets and Robes.

0. D. ARMY SHIRTS, with double elbow and lined at $3.35

Overcoats, Sheepskins, Mackinaws, Corduroy Reefers,
Gloves, Hose, Shoes, etc., now at lowest prices
Surplus Supply Store, 213 N, 4th Ave,
"It pays to walk a few blocks"

r

$ OIN=T H.E
IZES F RBEST IE

:' ,

NOW

IS

YOUR

OPPORTUNITY

If you have an original "IDEA" for a story
that you think will make a good motion
picture, don't waste it but enter the
University Movie Contest

i
L

NOW BEING CONDUCTED BY

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

He:
He:
le:

An Unpleasant Thought
Girls are just like horse trainers.
How's that?,
They leave you when you're broke.
- Cicero.
Quoth Eppie Taff:
They're praying now
For Hiram Rapp,
He got caught in
His new bear trap.
- Doo Sum.

RULES OF CONTEST
1. All manuscripts must be typewritten on white
812 x 11 inch paper. Original copies, not carbons,
must be submitted.
2. Manuscripts should be written as short as pos-
sible but fully explaining situations and detail of
story. ;4
3. The writer's name and address must be on the
upper left hand corner of the first page ofthe man-
uscript.
4. Manuscripts not accepted will be returned only
if self-addressed and stamped envelopes are en-
closed.
5. Manuscripts will be judged by competent
judges picked by The Daily and the producers.
6. Two prizes will be awarded, the first of $50
and the second of $25.
7. Manuscripts should be addressed to The Daily
in care of the scenario editor.
8. Contest closes at 6 o'clock Wednesday night,
February 1st, 1922.

A FEW SUGGESTIONS
1. A scenario is the description of the action of
a story in its proper order, but not necessarily di-
vided into scenes of giving the detailed action.
2. Don't forget that the heart and soul of the
scenario is its story. That is the great thing, the
essential thing, and the all important thing about
the scenario. If the story is a fascinating thing of
heart-interest, clean romance, adventure or mystery,
then your scenario is good at heart.
3. Stories of a dramatic type are desired. Drama
makes a more definite appeal and is easier to por-
tray than comedy or farcical comedy.
WHAT WE WANT IS AN "IDEA"
Something original is the essential thing in this
contest - something that is away from the time-
worn stories.
IT IS NOT NECESSARY
for your "idea" to be developed into scenario form--
just simply tell us your story and we will attend
to the detail.

Safety First
Mother: Willie, go out to the ice-box and bring
me in some butter.
Willie: But ma, I'm skeered o' the dark. I don'
wana go out there.
Mother: Now sonnie, hasn't Mother always told
you not to be afraid. God is everywhere and he
won't let anything hurt you.
Willie (walks to edge of darkness, hesitates, and
then in a sudden burst of reverence): Oh, God!
Please hand me out the butter !
-Rosie O Grady.
Famous Closing Lines
'Saved by a hair." said the starving man as he
brought down a rabbit with the last shell in his
gun. ERM.

THIS CONTEST IS OPEN TO EVERYONE CONNECTED WITH THE UNIVERSITY WITH THE EX-
CEPTIONS OF THE "MICHIGAN DAILY" EDITORIAL AND BUSINESS STAFFS
NOTE:-Ail those who are considering submitting scenarios and who desire and further informa-
tion can interview the producing company's rieresentative at the publications reading room, second
floor of the Press Building, from 2 to 4 o'clock Thursday afternoon, January 19, 1922.

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