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January 17, 1922 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-01-17

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DAY AND
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VOL. XXXIF, No. 82

ANN ARBOR. MICHIGAN, TUESDAY. JANUARY 17. 1922

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ARMS CONFERENCE
SETTILES CHINES
TARIFF PROBLEM
AGREEMENT PROVIDES CHANGE IN
SCHEDULE AT VARIOUS
PERIODS'
POSTPONE ACTION ON
JAPAN'S 21 POINTS
Spheres of Influence Question Awaits
Disposal of Shantung
Matter

Speaks Tonight 'ILLINOIS QUINTET
D0EFEATS MICHIGAN
. BY 20-17 SCORE,

CUniversity and Union Praised From
Coast To Coast for Hospitality

BURTON 5ul
S. C. A. O
TAL TO

(By Associated Press)
Washington, Jan. 16.-Final adop-
tion of the new Chinese tariff agree-
ment by the Far East committee of
the arms conference, formal postpone-
ment of consideration of the famous
21 demands imposed upon China by
Japan in 1913, and of the question of
the sphere of influence, until the Shan-
tung question has been disposed of,
and reaffirmation by Secretary Hughes
of the American "open door" policy in
China, marks the resumption today
by the conference of its study of the
Far Eastern question,..
The Far Eastern committee has not
met since .Jan. 5, pending efforts of
the naval committee to complete its
work. Today's meeting was cailed on
short -notice to pass on the final draft
of the tariff agreement to which the
last touches had been put at a meet-
ing of the sub-committee on Saturday.
Under the tariff agreement, the tariff
revision commission at Shanghai shall
immediately revise the schedule adopt-
ed in 1918 so that the customs duty
shall he five per cent. This revision
shall be complete within four months
and become effective within two
months thereafter.
For the purpose of keeping the tar-
iff schedule up to date, thus assuring
an effective rate instead of a nominai
one as at present, the agreement pro.
vides fqr a revision at the end of four
years an4 again every seven years
thereafter. No, mention is made of
restoring to China autonomy o.ver her
tariff, as asked by the Chinese dele-
gation, in its 10 points presented when
,the arms conference opened.
MICHIGAN DEBATES 'FOR
BOTH AFFIRMATIVE AND NEGA-
TIVE TEAMS TO ARGUE IN-
DUSTRIAL QUESTION
Central Debating league will hold
its annual contest on Friday evening,
Jan. 20. Michigan's affirmative team
will meet the University of C1iicago's
negative tear-in Ann Arbor at Sarah
Caswell Angell, hall, while the nega-
tive team will meet Northwestern
university at 1 vanston.
Judge Ira W. Jayne, circuit judge
of Detroit, will be presiding officer of
the Ann Arbor contest, and the judges
here will be Lloyd T. Williams, How-
ard Lewis, and Judge A. H. Miller, all
of Toledo. Prof. Ray K. Immel, inter-
collegiate contest director, will ac-
company the negative team to Evans-
ton,-L
The question for debate is Resolv-
ed, that the Kansaa Industrial Court
plan for settling industrial disputes
should be adopted throughout the
United States. The members of the af-
firmative team are: Edward T. Rams-
dell, '23, Ralph R. Johnson, '28, and
George E. igge, '23. The members of
the negative team are; Gerrit Dem-
minkg, '23, Q. E. Densmore, '22, Paul
A. 3ehmus, '23

JAMES SCHERMERHORN, WHO AD-
dresses the Students' Press Club To-.
night.
SENATE ACCEPTS
ATHLEITICREPORT
Board in Control Shows $247459
Received from Sports for Year
Ending June 30
HENRY C. ADAMS' MEMORIAL
READ AT REGULAR MEETING
Reports of the Board in Control of
.thletics and the Henry Carter Adams
Memorial committee were read and
accepted at the regular meeting of the
University Senate held last night in
the Law building.
The Adams Memorial committee of
Fhe Senate is composed of Prof. R. M.
Wenley, of the philosophy depart
nent, chairman, Prof. S. Lawrence
Bgelow, of the chemistry depart-
ment, and Prof. L. Leo Sharman, of
the economics department. Its report
dealt with the life and achievements
f Professor Adams, who until last
spring was the head of the depart-
ment of political economy here.
Outlines Life -
The memorial first gave a brief out-
line of his early life in the West and
>ome of his college experences. His
studies at Johns Hopkins university
and the University of Heidelberg were
*ollowed by four years in the poltical
science department at Cornell. In 1887
e was apponted to the newly organ-
zed economics department at Michi-
,an, having already become recogn'z-
ed as a national authority on social
and economic problems.
"Professor Adams was more of a
social phi'osopher than a poltical
economist," says the report. But his
achievements in practical fields gave
him a wide reputation. He was ap-
nointed to head the statistics division
-f the Interstate Commerce commis-
pion, a position that involved the or-
-anI7ation of the accounting systems
of the nation's railways. He also or-
-anized the system of accounts for
'he railroads in China, a work that
required a number of years.
Athletic Report Complete
Some sali.ent facts about the athletic
nroblems and the results accomplshd
during the year Juy 1, 1920, to June
30, 1921, were contained in the re-
nort of the Board in Control of Ath-
letics.
The mebership of the Board in Con-
trol of Athletics during this period
was made up of the following men:
Profs. L. M. Gram, C. T. Johnson, W.
A. Frayer, Ralrh W. Aigler, represent-
ing the Senate of the University;
Alan W. Boyd, '21, Dav'd E .Forbes
'21, and Robert Cook, '21. represent-
*ng the students; and P. G. Bartelme.
director of outdoor athletics. Cook
graduated from the University in the
middle of the year and he was suc-
ceeded by Angus Goetz, '22M.
Walter S. Gurd company, of De
books andaccounts of the Athletic as-
sociation, which name is applied to the
corporation carrying on the business
activities of the board. The ana'ysis
of the receipts and disbursements for
the year included the following:
Receipts: general, $101,950.20; foot-
ball, $131,653.10; baseball, $7,122.55;
(Continued on Page Eight)

MILLER STARS FOR WOLVERINES.
MAKING FIVE GOALS FROM
FIELD
GAME MARKED BY HARD
FIGHT BY BOTH TEAMS
Kipke Forced to leave Game After
Dislocating Shoulder; Paper
Replacing Him
(Special to The Daily)
Champaign, Ill., Jan. 16.-The Wol-
verines lost to Illingis, 20 to 17, last
night in a game marked by hard figt-
ing on both sides. Carney scored the
first point of the game on a free
throw. Miller followed with a field
goal, giving Michigan a one point-lead.
Kipke then added another field goal.
Uter five minutes of play time was
called for Kipke dislocated his thumb.
He remained in the gamebut about
the middle of the half was forced to
leave the game with a displaced shoul-
der. Paper replaced him.. The Store
see-sawed the remainder of the first
half it finally ending 11 to 10 in favor
of Illinois. Mller kept the game close,
with three more field goals.
Illinois got away to a good start
the second half increasing their lead
to eight points before Michigan scor-
ed getting three field goals and a free
throw. Michigan then held them
scoreless from the field while Miller
and Ely contributed a field goal apiece
and added three points by free throws.
Carney, Illinois' highly touted scor-
ing star, was held down by Cappon's
great guarding to a single field goal.
His ability to gage free throws reg-
ularly was the deciding factor of the
game.
HOCKEY TEAM DEFEAT
DETROIT RAYLS, 3 TO 2
Michigan's informal hockey team de-
feated the Detroit Rayls last night in
a fast game at the Coliseum by a
score of 3 to 2. During the first per-
iod neither team was able to score,
good defense by both teams preventing
any counters. Kahn, playing right de-
fense for Michigan, performed credit-j
ably until he was hurt by an oppon-
ent's stick and had to be removed.
The second period was even faster
and Michigan first penetrated the de-
fense, Follis shooting the goal. The
Rayls then scored by clever work.
Both teams scored again and the reg-
ular game ended with the score a tie,
2to 2. An overtime period of five
minutes was played and when there
were only 10 seconds left to play San-
regret made the winning counter
from the side and at quite a distance.
Notre Dame comes here tomorrow
night for a game. They are said to
have a fast team which should make
the game an interesting one. The
game will take place at 7 o'clock at
the Coliseum.
Soph ,tits Plan
Afternoon Mrixeri

Michigan is receiving praise from
coast to coast on account of the Union
and its efficiency in caring for visit-
ors to the University. Letters receiv-
ed recently from delegates to the
American Philological association and
the Archaeological Institute of Amer-
ica, which met here during the Christ-
mas holidays, indicate that the visit-
ors were highly pleased with their en-
tertainment while here.
Many Write
From Johns Hopkins university
comes the word, "The University of
Michigan certainly treated us all mag-
nificently." From Brown university
comes "a sense of deep appreciation
of a'l the courtesies shown us and the
flawless arrangements for our com-
fort in Ann Arbor." A delegate from
Western university, 0 atario, says,
"Would you mind registering and
passing on to the others who were
directly responsible for such a suc-
cessful meeting my humble word of
appreciation for the smoothness with
DETROLTEDITO R'
TO ADDRESS CLUB.

James

Sciermerhorn, Well Known

Writer, Talks to Student Press
Club Tonight at Union
WILL DISCUSS WORK ON
METROPOLITAN NEWSPAPER
James Schermerhorn, famous edi-
torial writer of the Detroit Times,
will speak at the Students' Press club
dinner to be held at 6:15 o'clock this
evening at the Union. He is not only
one of the best known newspaper men
of the state, but is recognized through-
/out the country as an unusually force-
ful and interesting speaker, always
standing for high ideals in journal-
ism.
Has Wide Experience
Mr. Schermerhorn's foundation for
idealism in journalistic enterprise was
?aid in his primary education gained
,n the pubzlic schools, in his father's
orinting office, and later in his col-
lege work at Oberlin and at the Unit-
ed States Military academy. After
resigning from the academy to take
"'arge of his, father's newspaper, the
Hudson Gazette, he remained as pub-
lisher for nine years. He then be-
came the Washington correspondent
of the Detroit News, later being con-
nected with the Detroit Free Press as
editorial writer and political editor.
In 1900 he founded the Detroit
Times of which he became president
and genral manager until Arthur Bris-
bane took over the paper. He remains
in the capacity of - editorial writer.
During his career he has addressed
many conventions and clubs in almost
every section of the country in expo-
sition of the editorial and advertis-
ing policies of the Times, holding that
publ'shers should not occupy public
offices. In addition to his newspaper
work, Mr. Schermerhorn has contrib-
uted numerous articles to magazines.
Public Invited
He has spoken on several previous
occasions in Ann Arbor, but his talk
tonight will deal more particularly
with problems of journalism and his
experiences in the metropolitan fie'd
of newspaper work. Students who are
not members of the Press club are
welcome and all may secure tickets
for the dinner either at Wahr's or at
the Union desk. Those who desire to
join the club should hand in their
names to the secretary this evening.
Sigma Delta Chi
Will Take 8 Men
Sigma Delta Chi, national profes-
sional journalistic fraternity, will take
in eight members at the initiation at
4:30 o'clock this afternoon at room
306 of the Union.
Following the initiation a banquet
will be served at the Union at which
Lee A White, '10, of the Detroit News,
formerly national president off the
organization, and Edwin G. 'Burrows,
of the department of rhetoric and
journalism, will speak.

which the details were arranged and
carried out."
A professor from the University of
Illinois writes, "May I express our
pleasant remembrance of everything
that was so thoughtfully planned,
both by those at Ann Arbor and those
at Detroit, for the comfort and enter-'
tainment of the members of the asso-
ciation and the institute; we shall not
soon forget it." A delegate from Adel-
bert college, Cleveland, expresses ap-
preciation of "the care and courtesy
which you and your colleagues of the
classical faculty and your wives
showed in providing for the comfort
and pleasure of members of the asso-
ciation."
Men Housed at Union
All male delegates were housed at
the Union, and the women at Betsy
Barbour dormitory, and according to
Dr. Frank E. Robbins, assistant to the
President, and Dean John R. Effinger,
the smoothness with which the con-
ventions were conducted would not
have been possible had it not been for
the excellent accommodations afford-
ed by these buildings.
During the Christmas holidays of
1922 geologists and mineralogists of
the country will hold their convention
at the Union, and in 1923 the Modern
Language Associationpf America will
also meet there dur ng the holidays.
"The University is becoming fam-
ous because of the excellence ofthe
Michigan Union," said Dean Effinger
in an interview yesterday.
CHRISTIAN PRINCIES
APPLY TO LL PROLES
- DR. JENKS
CONTAIN SOLUTION OF WORLD
ARMAMENT QUESTIONS IN
LIBERAL DOCTRINES
"It is unfortunate," said Prof. Jer-
emiah W. Jenks, '78, head of the de-
partment of Oriental commerce and
politics of New York university, in his
address at the University service Sun-
day night in Hill auditorium, "that,
throughout history, people have look-
ed on Christ as a religious teacher
only." He stated that the principles
Christ laid down have an equal appli-
cation to political, social, and busi-
ness problems.1
Nations Should Follow Faith3
Inasmuch as eight of the nine na-
tions taking part in the conferencea
for the limitation of armaments, fromc
which Professor Jenks has Just come,
profess Christianity, he, pointed out
that it was only natural to turn to the
founder of the faith for some of the
basic principles to guide the relations
of nations. These he said were threet
in number; first, the principle of
truth; second, the principle of the
worth of the common man; andt
third, the principle that the welfare of
others should be the first considera-
tion.
"From the social standpoint," he
said, "the greatest sin is a lie; ourl
entire civilization is based on mutual
understanding." He stated that most
of the po'itical controversies of the
world, both national and internation-
(Continued on Page Eight)
No Extra Charge
For Dinner Dance

"I think an organization whi
resents the principles of the E
is just as exactly important
more so than football, baseball,
bating," said President Marion
ton in speaking before solicitors
S. C. A. drive for $4,000 in La
yesterday afternoon.
President Much Concernei
"I really believe that the. pi
for which the S. C. A. stands a
solutely vital to this institul
.which we are all a part," said
dent Burton. "I am very muw
cerned that the University of
igan should be a place whe:
things of a spirit are recognized
the things'that are worth while
have a chance.
"We cannot ask you to come
auditorium every morning for
services. You will agree with
when you get 10 or 11 thousar
dents together as we have her
ought to be enough appreciat
character and of religion and o
general ideals without whit
world cannot go. Now I want
with all candor, that I am con
in this organization, I believe
organization, I believe it has In
markable possibilities for you
"Must Recognize Characte
The President said that many
believe state universities to 1
ond rate institutions, and tha
send their sons and daughters
vately endowed institutions I
they think there are in opera
these institutions forces which
for the establishment of cha
idealism and religion. In ordei
tablish the leadership of the at
stitution it is necessary to mal
;le see that character is recognl
the state university, he stated.
,All details of the campaign w.
ranged for at the meeting and
ors will start canvassing of th
pus today for the $4,000 budg
continue to work until Th
night.
Fraternities and house clubs
been asked to subscribe as a
They are requested to have
pledges in as soon as possible
their names can be published.
Pledge Cards Also Used
A contribution from every man
aim of the campaign. Pledge
will be used, and if a cash co
tion can not be made during th
three days, a pledge may be
and the money paid any time
May 1, 1922.
The drive is under the supe
of C. Maurice Atkinson. '22, g
chairman, and Lawrence E. Dooi
assistant general chairman. Th
captains are: Lawrence Snel
'23, J. R. Riford, '23, R. W. P
'24E, H. J. Nutting, '24, M. R. Sc]
'23, E. T. Ingle, '22, R. G. Bt
'23, Bernard Segall, '24, J. H.
Jr., '24E, G. E. Sloan, '24L;-W. I
braith, '24,' V. H. Method, '23,
Steketee, '24, J. G. Vinkemulde
R. R. Sharp, '23, E. C. Stark, '24
Gilner, '24, Richard Sweet, '23,
Cavanaugh, '24, and R. S. Huds
Robert Ackley, '23E, will have
of the records.
There are 20 teams with 15 c
teemen on each team. A banqui
be given for. the high team and
to the individual bringing in th
est amount of money.

POINTS O
OF PI

20 TEAMS COMM
BIG CAMPAIG
Contribution to Be Aske
-Man; Will Solicit F
As Units

RAILY WORKERS, NOTICE
Members of The Daily staff,
editorial and builsness, will meet
at noon today at Rentscheler's
studio on East Huron street, to
have the group picture taken for
the Michiganensian. All nem-
bers of the staffs are asked to be
present.

Sophomore literary students will
hold their first social event of the year
for both men and women from 3 to 6
o'clock Saturday afternoon in the par-
lors of Barbour gymnasium, it was
announced yesterday by C. J. Verker-
ke, chairman of the social committee.
Rhodes' orchestra will play.
Tickets will be limited to 100
couples, the price being 50dcents per
person. To purchase tickets the ap-
plicant must show a treasurer's re-
ceit indicating that his dues have been
paid, or his Union membership card,
the purpose of these requirements be-
ing to keep all but sophomore lits from
attending the mixer, since the hall is
of limited capacity. Tickets will be
sold beginning tomorrow by the fol-
lowing committee: C. J. Verkerke, G.
C. Hill, Morris Robbins, Mary Hayes,
Doris Kraus, Dorothy Rockwell, D. W.!
Steketee, and M. S. Crosby.

No extra charge for the evening'e
service will be made at the first din.
ner dance given by the Union, which
is planned for the period from 6 to 8
o'clock Friday evening in the main
dining room. Dress will be infor-
mal during the evening's program,
which is intended as an additional
feature to the. regular evening dinner
given in the dining hall.
The center of the hall will be com-
pletely cleared of tables, in order to
accommodate the crowd of dancers.
Music will be provided by a special
orchestra pla6ed in the cleared space.
The plan is under the supervision
of the Union dance committee and, if
successful, is intended as a regular
feature of the Union's social program.
The dances as planned will be similar}
to those now carried on at a number
of eastern and western universities.

' -
i
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DAILY TRYOUJ
Freshmen who expect
in The Daily business
ment as tryouts the se
mester may meet at T'
officein the Press bu
3:15 o'clock tomorrow.

I-

77-

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5 Sodas
3 Movies
1 Dance

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Make:
Teach:
Develop:

5 Poor Kids Happier
4 High School Students Michigan
1 United Democratic Ideal

STUDENT CHRISTIAN

ASSOCIATION DRIVE

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