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January 14, 1922 - Image 5

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-01-14

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

9

ILLINOIS HEA ARNIVL TAKES
ON LAR6ER DIMENSIONS ANNUALLY

Invitations Mailed to 2.0 Colleges and
Universities; 1921 Entry Totals
41 Schools
MARCH 4 IS DATE SET FOR
THIS YEAR'S MEET AT URBAN.,
Urbana, Ill., Jan. 13.-Prepasrations
for the fifth annual University of Il-
linois relay 'carnival, to be held in
the huge Armory, March 4, are rapidly
getting under way and invitations
have been sent to 250 colleges and un-
iversities in the country.
The meet is one of the greatest in-
door events in the nation for colleges,
for it brings together all of the best
track athleitcs from all sections. Last
year w96 athletes representing 41
schools competed, and some excellent
marks were established.
Southern Schools Expected
Southern colleges and universities
are taking to the track more than
ever before, and it is expected that
many of the Texas teams and other
good aggregations will send crack re-
lay teams to the Illinois .event. Let-
ters have beenreceived from many
sections asking for the list of events
on the program.
Coach Harry Gill, who originated
this carnival six years ago, has written
to 41 coaches who were here with their
teams last season asking them for
suggestions concerning changes foi
the betterment of the meet, such as
* the addition of more special races.
All of the relay races will be' again
staged and many more special races
are being considered.
Profits Defray Expenses
The profits of the meet, as is the
custom at the Illini indoor event, will
be pro-rated among the competing
teams in proportion to the number
of men actually competing and
the distance traveled by the teams.
This plan worked vpry successfully
at the fourth annual carnival and the
visiting coaches were pleased with the
large sums they received, for in many
cases it paid most of the traveling ex-
penses of the athletes.
The cpntest will again be held in
the Armory, which is a huge structure
and amply large *for a meet of this
type. It has a cinder path 6 3-4 laps
1922 LITERARY CLASS
The lists of paid and unpaid
dues will not be posted in the
Registrar's office until the aft-
ernoon of Friday, Jan. 20. Every
senior who has not yet paid their
dues please mall check for $2 to
the treasurer at once. Enclose
self-addressed and stamped en-
velope -for receipt. a
C. MAURICE ATKINSON,
Treasurer.

to the mile, 10 feet wide and inside of
this a straightaway 75 yards long. It
has an area of 107,000 square feet of
floor space.
WIit s of Sport
It is firmly believed that University!
of Minnesota authorities are making
a strong bid for Hugo Bezdek, athletic
director and head football coach at
Penn State, although nothing official
has been announced. Upon a recent
visit to the Gopher institution Bezdek
expressed great admiration for the
school. It has been rumored that
salary is the chief hindrance in Min-
nesota's getting him, but that his de-
mand is under careful consideration.
Glenn Warner, coach of the Univer-
sity of Pittsburg football team, con-
sidered by many critics as the greatest
gridiron mentor of his time, wili make
r trip to the coast soon, with the ob-
ject of getting, a line on football pro-
spects in the West, and to sake a de-
cision regarding his acepetance as di-
rector of athletics and football coach
beginning 1924 of Leland Stanford un-
iversity. If Warner decides in favor
of sucA a position, the East will un-
doubtedly lose one of its most valu-
able football men.
Possibility of a wide expansion of
the Intercollegiate Athletes of Am-
erica throughout all sections of the
country is very likely to be realized
when the annual meeting takes place
in New York City, March 4. At a
meeting of the advisory committee last
week, an amendment was proposed that
any college that was a member would
not be dropped if it were not repre-
sented in championship games at least
once in two consecutive years. Com-
petition would rely entirely upon mem-
bership and conformity to the I. C. A.
A. A. A. regulations and eligibility code
without compulsory restrictions rela-
tive to continuity of such competition.
DR. BEEBE SPEAKS BEFORE
/ GUN AND BLADE MEABERS
Members of the Gun and Blade club
were entertained at their meeting at
the Union Thursday evening with a
half-hour humorous talk by Dr. Hugh
M. Beebe, who was chief of the surgi-
cal service, evacuation hospital 19, in
France.
Following Dr. Beebe's talk there
was a wrestling match between R.
Halberg, '24E, and R. Defoe, under the
direction of the University Boxing
club. E. M. Clifford, '23D, president
of the club, made a short talk in favor
of boxing as a recognized Varsity
sport.
Read Michigan Daily Ads and you
will buy wisely.-Adv.

OLYMPIC HEADPREDICTS
INCREASE IN THLETICS
BELIEVES POPULARITY OF SPORT
PEURANENT AND DUE TO
GAIN
(By Associated Press)
The coming year i expected to be!
one of great activity in coege track
" ,a e.u aLnle*ics aa sort of al
ciasses, according to Uustavus T. Kir-
uy, president o thie American ulympic
.oumittee, at the Antwerp nternatiun-
a meet. Mr. Kiroy states:
"Coiege atnieues received a splendid
ampetus curing te past year oue in
part to the visit of tuie uxord-aim-
.ciuge universities track team last
summer and te resulant inernation-
a intercolegiate meets at Boston and
Aew 0oRt. txoif, tennis. smai yacut
racing and other forms of amateur
sport also figured in similar interna-
ional contests.
"rle lozz schedule is still in the
making but already the Universiy
of i ennsyivania has announced that it
wil send a relay team to London for
competition against the English un-
versities. A comnined Oxord-Cam-
bridge lacrosse team will tour this
cuuilsry next summer and British
yachtsmen will race for an interna-
tionaltrophy in Longt sland. These
are, to my mind, but the forerunners
of other and bigger events, in keeping
with the spread of sport.
"Last year was one of most remark-
able popularity in all forms of athletic
comapetition but I believe that the next
few seasons will witness a sport ex-
pansion far more impressive, perhaps
not as spectacular but certainly sane.
I believe ideals will in general be
higher; I believe there wil be more
honesty in amateur sports and for
that matter more honesty in profes-
sional spdrt. I believe there will be
more appreciation of the fact that
while amateurism is good, honesty is
better; that there is no disgrace to be
an honest professional.
"I blieve the popularity of sport is
both permanent and progressive and
due to cumulative causes. For at
leat 25 years a number of us have
been preaching at every opportunity
the doctrine of good health and happi-
ness through sport, and I honestly be-
lieve that this continued preaching,
this sowing of the seeds of exercise.
recreation, play, athletic competition,
etc., has brought forth the harvest of
last year and will continue to bring
forth similar splendid harvests in
years to come.
"Literal hundreds of thousands
of boys have had athletics instilled in-
to their very makeus by such or-
ganizations as the Public School Ath-
letic leagues in the various cities, the
Playground and Recreation Associa-
tion of America, the Community Ser-
vice, Inc.. the Y. M. C. A., the Y. M. H.
A. A., and other similar religious or-
ganizations. More than half a million
young men in our colleges and uni-
versities in which athletic competition
and physical welfare is an essential
part of the currriculum, and even old-
er ones who are in the various terri-
torial routes of the Amateur Athletic
union, the Amateur Oarsmen of Am-
ercia, the Fencers' league and other
similar national bodies must sooner
or later show the result of the teach-
ings of these bodies. 4
"By no means of little importance
has been the promotion of the ideal of
the Olympic games, i.e., of "Sport for
all and all for sport," and "Sport for
sport's sake," and which ideal we in
tiis country are always endeavoring
to further. The Olympic idea has cer-
tainly taken hold of the entire coun-
try."
SOPH LIT HOCKEY NOTICE
1 All soph lits interested in class
hockey call Masters before Fri-
day. Entries must be in by that
time. Phone 2384-M.

Lost something? A Classified Ad in
The Daily will find it for you.-Adv.
® alwy h e avorit ae with
a
* -
0aBBB PIPES
R Standard of the world and
* ailways the favorite with *
Michigan Men.
U We have been Ann Arbor
1 distributors for sixteen
8 years.
8 Class Pipes and Pipe re-
1 pairs a specialty.
M
N
- N
n~ n c*R C~E
_____ INNHE DA
"WeU5 jU t 1ea z yo gt
* a - - -- - - S

FARRLL'S MEN FEATUR
EXHIBITION MEET TODAY
RELAY RACES BETWEEN VAR.
SITY SQUADS TO FEATURE
PROGRAM
For the first time this year the pub-
lic will be allowed to see Michigan's
track hopes in action when, at 31
o'clock this afternoon, Coach Far-
rell's men will stage a miniature re-
lay carnival. Other than giving the
track men their first real competition
the relays should serve for the edifi-
cation and enlightenment of the stu-
dent body on the existing track situa-
tion, and a goodly number of specta-
tors are expected to witness the
events.
Six Lap Relay
Excitement galore is promised, de-
spite the fact that the competition is
to be strictly home. grown. A par-
ticularly lively bit of attraction is
looked for from the six lap relay in
which each man of the two four man
teams will sprint a lap and a half.
The two teams, one captained by Sar-
gent and the other by Burke, area
evenly matched, as are all of the
competing aggregations, Sargent be-
ing supported by Chubb, Purdy, and
Goldwater, and Burke depending for
victory on Kelly, Walter, and Tar-
vie.
Joyner Heads Runners ,
'Of equal interest will be the 12 lap
event, run by the leading quarterl
mile candidates. Joyner, star Varsity
440 man, will head Thomas, Davis,
and Morton against Lewis and his
trio of sprinters, Martin, Seamans
and Rankin. Half milers also will
take a hand in the proceedings, Doug-
lass captaining Weeks, Dunklin, and
Earhart against Gibson, as captain,
and Hattendorf, Palhamus and Read.
Perhaps the biggest event of the
program will be the 32 lap relay, with
the Varsity long distance candidates
taking part, Standish leading one ag-
gregation and Davis the other.
Patronizen aily Adverttmers.-Adv

Albion to Have New Gym
Albion, Jan. 13.-Following the de-
struction of the Albion college gym-
nasium here Thursday night work on
a new and completely modern build-
ing will begin at once. The old build-

I
Calkins Fletcher Drug Co. and the Cushing

Calkin Pletcher Dru C.I h eCushing
Drug Co. invite the inspection of
RPRICE
TREBO $6.0
CN
PIPES
stopper
In the stem
stops all
moisture
Agents for the United States and Canada
GROSVENOR NICHOLAS & CO., Inc.
12 East 48th Street New York City

I

I

ing had served as the athletic field
and gymnasium for the past 30 years.
IS K A T ES
Sharpened
THE BEST WORK
DONE AT THE
RIGHT PRICE

i
i
G

Gus. J. Vogel
113 W. WASHINGTON
Phone 20674

14
HOUSANDS of smokers have proved it-and now
give the verdict to you-
Of all the other tobaccos NATURE has produced
- none can approach the finest varieties of pure Turkish
for cigarettes-
None has the delicious FLAVOR of the finest Turkish-
None gives the ENJOYMENT of the finest Turkish-
None will SATISFY you as will the finest Turkish--

None
Turkish

but the highest grade and personally selected
tobaccos is used in MURAD.

"
41

AT
MARTHA
WASH INGTON
THEATER
Ypsilanti
Sun., Mon., Tues.,
Wed.
Jan. 15.16t 17,18
Shows Starting at.
1:30, 3:30, 7:00. 9-00
Mat. ..35 Eve...50

ADRIAN-ANN ARBOR BUS
e(TTTT P PV '"TVPn 'Towev
BUS LEAVES CORNER OF MAIN &
HURON STREETS INSTEAD OF
ALLENEL HOTEL
Sead a Lwu Ccentrat tanuato
A.M. P.M. P.M A&PWs
Daly Daily Daily Daib
7:30 t:30 Lv... Adrian ...Ar. 7w0 12.43
3.*s a:o ... Tecuneh ... 6:25 12:1(
8:25 2:25...... Clinton..... 6:oS t:S.
0:15 3:15 Saline...5:15 it .0
o 45 3:4s Ar. Ann Arbor LV. 4:45 to:3
A.M. . PM P.M. A&PIM
Read Up
SUNDAYS AND HOLIDAYS

TRAVEL INSURANCE!
T7e perils of loss, or damage to
your traveling outfits and valuables
are constant and many:
Hazards of
FIRE THEFT WRECK
in or on
Hotels, Depots, Clubs, Railroads,
Steamers, Buses, Taicabs, etc.; or
you may similarly lose belongings at
your Country or Golf club, or Laun-
dry and many other places.
POTTER & ALLSHOUSE
601.4 FIRST NAT'L BANK BLDG.

STUDENTS LUNCH

409 EAST JEFFERSON

P.M.
3:30
4 :e5
425
S :45
p m

Lv... Adrian ..Ar.
.... Tecumseh ....
.. Clinton . .
.Saline ...
A.Anni Arbor _LT.

P.M.
,:oo
8:25
8:05
7:15
6:45
P M

ww how wwo--o

OPEN 6:30 A. M.
TILL 11:00 P. M.

I

THIS LAVIIN
COLUMN FI E
CLOSES
AT 3 P.M. ADVER'TISING

THIS
COLUMN
CLOSES
AT 3 P.M.

"What Do You Know About the Bible?
HEAR
PROF. W. D. HENDERSON
WHEN HE BEGINS
HIS SERIES OF FIVE LESSONS ON
"WHAT WE KNOW ABOUT THE BIBLE"
AT THE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH SUNDAY NOON

... ..

11 1 1

mm

L, fl' l

a+

FOR RENT

I

i

I

FOR RENT-For next semester, large LOST - Will party who picked up
warm, newly furnished room for Reitz "Mathematics and Finance" in
two students, less than block from P. 0. Wednesday. Please notify W.
campus. Seperate beds, double desk. F. Hill, 2588-J. 80
Large clothes closet. 510 E. Jeffer-
son. 80-2 LOST-Dark brown scarf. Marked L.
-- W. S. Please call 1395-M. Ask for
FOR RENT-Rooms. Now or second . Stoddard. 80-2

Mid -Season

Pattern Hats

semester. Reasonable. 308 E. Mad-
ison._Phone 1395-R. 80-4
FOR RENT-A very desirable front
suite for two students. In quiet
home. Phone 2545-M. 79-2
FOR RENT-Two large front rooms
in new house. Apply 1011 Church
St. 79-6
FOR RENT-Rooms for three men.
Phone 1194-M. 422 E. Washington
St. 78-4
FOR SALE
FOR SALE-One pair men's half-hock-
ey skates, as good as new. size 11,
with shoes attached. Phone 2141-M
between six and eight P. M. 80-2
FOR SALE-One baritone saxophone,
one slide trombone, one banjo, two
drums, one dress suit. Call 936-W.
79-3
LOST
LOST-Sheepskin coat, Jan. 2, on in-
terurban care going to Jackson. Re-
ward. W. D. Butler, 810 S. Univer-
sity. 470-M. 70-3

LST-Two-fingered driving mitt, last
Wednesday. Finder call 1837-M. Re-
Reward. 80-2
WANTED
WANTED-Seven clean-cut men with
sales ability to work during Easter
vacation in Ann Arbor and nearby
towns. A good opportunity for men
who can qualify. For particulars
see Mr. Leader, 232 Nickels Arcade.
79-2
WANTED-To exchange 4 front row
tickets to "The Bat" at Whitney,
Saturday night, for seats farther
bayk. 2809-M. 80
MISC ELLANEOUS
AN EXCELLENT opportunity for three
to six students to obtain board with
good cooking. Rates reasonable. No
other boarders. Two meals if prefer-
rea. 1108 Willard St. 79-2
FURNITURE Repairing, Upholstering,
Refinishing, Caning. Verne Smith.
Phone 2616-R. 78-15
DANCE TO some mean music every
Saturday night at Woodman Hall.
Everybody come. 79-3

No Models Duplicated

$750 t 500

4

EMMA B. FOGERTY'S SPECIALTY HAT SHOP
117 East Liberty Street

11

I'I

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