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January 11, 1922 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 1922-01-11

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THEE WEATHER

PROBABLY SNOW
TODAY

r Sir i1a

attu.

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIRE
SERVICE

i

VOL. XXXII. No. 77

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 11, 1922

PRICE FIVE CENTS

i

NEVIBERR'S CASE
NGSINBALNE
AS SENATE PLTS
DEMOCRATS ATTEMPT TO REVERT
CASE TO COMMITTEE FOR
ACTION
VOTE MAY BE REACHED
AF EARLY HOUR TODAY
Both Parties Claim Victory by Close
Majorities as Vice Appears to
Tighten
(By Associated Press)
Washington, Jan. 10.-The Newber-
ry election controversy in the senate
today took on the appearance of a
tightening vice when the title to Tru-
man H. Newberry's seat, in the opin-
ion of leaders, was brought into the
balance. Both sides claimed victory
tonight, Mr. Newberry's supporters
predicting a majority of 7 to 4 votes,
while the opponents declared he would
be unseated by a margin of 5 to 3
votes.
May Revert to Committee
Five speeches voicing oppostion to
Mr. Newberry's being seated were de-
livered on the floor today while speak-
ers of both sides were busy examining
the situation in the expectation that a
vote may be reached tomorrow. If the
vote on the issue is not taken, there is
a possibility of recommending the
whole question to the senate commit-
tee on privileges and elections with in-
strudtion to call Mr. Newberry on ex-
amination and for further investiga-
tion of the record of his campaign
committee.
May Reach Vote Today
The senate will meet an hour early
tomorrow in the expectation that a
vote may be reached during the day
and with at least five senators prepared
to discuss the case on the floor.
They said that Mr. Newberry should
be called to testify his rights by us-
ual senatorial courtesy and custom
of inviting, rather than supplicating
its different members. They claimed
the records are not complete and will
not be without his testimony.
EVANS RESIGNS S SC!
EXECUTIVE SECETAR
Thomas S. Evans, executive secre-
tary of the Student Christian associa-~
tion for two and a half years, has re-
signed from the S. C. A. Louis Rei-
mann has been e'ected temporary
chairman of the staff.
Mr. Evans has gone to St. Louis.
Mo., as field representative of the
Park-Westminster campaign to raise
$1,035,000 for endowment to Park col-
lege, Westminster college, and for a
resident memorial for the student pas-
tor at the University of Missouri.
GORGHOS' INITIAL HEARING
POSTPONED TILL NEXT WEEi
Judge Thomas Will Dclde Whethei
Accused Man Shall Be Tried
by County
George Gorghos, now held in th
city jail in connection with the deat
of Raymond Fletcher w)o is suppose
to have died from poisonous Pquor
will be brought before Judge Thom
as' court next Tuesday afternon in
stead of yesterday, his temporary tria
being postponed a week. The post
ponement was made in request wit
Gorghos' attorney.
At the temporary hearings nex

Tuesday it will be decided whether the
accused man will be bound over to the
county court for regular trial.
King's Daughters Meet Today
Members of the University hospital
Circle of King's Daughters will holda
meeting at 2:30 o'clock this afternoon
In Lane hall auditorium. A report of
the year's work will be given by the
officers and the chairmen of the var-
ious committees.
Following the reports an election of
officers will be held for the year. A
cordial welcome is extended to all
those interested in social service or
hospital work.

BABST TO WRITE
CHIMES ARTICLE
Announcement has been made by.
Chimes' editors that Earl D. Babst,
'93, has accepted an invitation from
the magazine to write the career arti-
cle for the February number, which
will appear Feb. 15. Mr. Babst is
known as the "Sugar King," and is
president of the American Sugar Re-
fining company, the largest corpora-
tion of its kind in the world. His
story is called, "From State Street to
Wall Street."
Attorney General Harry M. Daugh-
erty, '81L, and Karl Edwin Harriman,
'98, editor of the Red Book, will write
articbles for the March and April
numbers.
ALL, ERIN AT PECE
AS BAILADJOURNS

PLANS FOR 1-HOP
PROGRESS RA DL

'i

Price

of Tickets to Be $6.50
Juniors Having First
Preference

with

APPLICATIONS MAY BE HAD
AT BOOTH IN UNION LOBBY

r
t
1
i
7
t

NEW

PRESIDENT AND CABINET'
APPEAR TO OPEN WAY
TO SETTLEMENT

(By Associated Press)
Dublin, Jan. 10. - When the Dail
Ereann adjourned tonight by consent
of all sides until Feb. 14, the situation
which last night was heated and ob-
scure hadf become to a great extent
clarified. The new president, Arthur
Griffith, and a new cabinet have been
e'ected and the way has been paved
for putting into acts the terms of the
treaty. Immense relief is felt at the
turn events have taken.
The temporary withdrawal of Ea-
monn De Valera and his supporters
from the Dail, with rumors as fore-
cast do not involve a permanent
clique. Mr. De Valera confined his
protest to the election of the new
president, decaring his unwillingness
to recognize the suitability to that
post of a man who as chairman o
the London delegation was bound to
carry into effect the treaty which, ac-
cording to De Valera, suverts the
Republic.
During the luncheon hour Mr. De
Valera, and his associates who left
the hall, held a private meeting. Some
of the boldhearted spirits advocated
refusal to return, but moderate coun-
cil prevailed and the Dail re-assem-
bled as a united body.
The De Valera party is meeting
again tonight to formulate a plan for
the future.
FELLOWSHIPS ARE
AWARDED TO GRADS
Alexander C. Burr, of Rugby, North
Dakota, has been awarded the Acme
White Lead & Color Works' fellowshp
in chemistry, amounting to $250 for
equipment and $750 for personal use.
Mr. Burr will be a candidate for a
Master's degree in chemistry this com-
ing June.
The Detroit Edison company fellow-
ships in highway engineering have
'-een awarded to Norman F. Carver,
B.S., Dartmouth and, and Berry E.
Brevick, B.S.C.E., and M.E., Iowa.
Meyer L. Casman, graduate of West
Point, has been awarded the Roy D.
Chapin fellowship in highway trans-
port.
J. Raymond Sheidler, B.S., South
Western college, Winfield, Kansas, is
holder of the Roy D. Chapin fellow-
ship in highway engineering.
POULTRY AND PET
STOCK SHOW OPENS
With people here from many parts
of the state, the annual poultry and pet
stock show opened Monday at 216
South Ashley street, for a week's run
under the auspices of the Washtenaw
County Poultry and Pet Stock associa-
tion.
The fair this year will be twice as
large as that of any previous year,
more poultry than the authorities of
the show can handle having been sub-
mitted. It is estimated that the total
number of entries, including rabbits
and poultry, is more than 750. There
have also been many entries this year
from all parts of the state, and the
special attractions this year at the
show in the way of quail, monkies,
pheasants, and other wild animals,
cover more than 45 feet of ground.
MICHIGAN MOVIE SCENARIOS
RECEIVE FINAL READING
'Scenarios for the University movie
submitted in the recent contest will
receive their final examination today
by a committee appointed by the
President, In conference with the
manager of the prducing company. It
is hoped that a final decision can be
announced before'the end of the week
The plots have all been examined
by the committee, whose chief inter
est was for dramatic possibilities and
literary qualities, and the represerita
tive of the producers, who will be in
town only for the day, will determine
their practicability for production.

Tickets for the J-Hop will sell for
$6.50, it was announced yesterday by
R. D. Gibson, '23, chairman of the
ticket committee. Applications for
tickets may be obtained at the Hop
information desk in the lobby of the
Union today, no tickets being sold,
however, at this time. For the benefit
of those who have classes from 1 to
5 o'clock inclusive, it has been arrang-
ed to extend the time to secure these
applications from 12:30 to 5 o'clock.
Tickets Will Be Mailed
Applications must be taken from the
Union, filled out and mailed to the
ticket committee, the address of which
will be found on the application
blank. Preference in the d'stribution
of tickets will be given first to those
of Junior standing who have spent
two and one-half years on the campus;
after these, come those Juniors who
have spent any fraction of two and
one-half years on the campus; the
tickets remaining will be distributed
to those seniors desiring them and, if
any are left, to the sophomores.
At the meeting of the representa-
tives from fraternities and house clubs
with the hop committee yesterday, the
rules and regulations governing the
hop and the house parties,' which have
been in force at all previous hops, i
were read and explained by C. A.
Hummer, chairman of the committee.
At this meeting, also, the representa-
tives from the various organizations
and 'groups of independents made ap-
plications for booths.
Booths Uniform
Fifty fraternities and houa .Nubs
and four groups of independents ap-
plied for booths which will sell at a
uniform price of $30. These booths!
will be decorated by the decoration
committee of the Hop in order that
they will all be alike, the groups buy-
ing them supplying the furnishings,
however. It will be necessary for
these groups to furnish punch bowls,
glasses and ladles, the committee
keeping the bowls filled with punch.
All fraternities, house clubs or groups
of independents who have not yet ap-
ried for booths and wish to do so'
should get in touch with A. C. Gibson,'
753, immediately.
No corsages will be worn at the
Hop, it has been decided by the com-
mittee, and either the conventional
full dess or the tuxedo may be worn
on this occasion.
The regular meeting of the general
committee for the Hop will be held

BATESON TO GIVE
LECTURE TONIGHT~
Director of John Innes Horticultural
Institution Chooses Subject
"Somatic Mutations"
GUEST OF NOTED SOCIETIES
OF COUNTRY'S ZOOLOGISTS
Prof. William Bateson, director of
the John Innes Horticultural institu-'
tion, Surrey, England, will deliver a'
University lecture at 8 o'clock this
evening in Natural Science auditorium
on the subject "Somatic Mutations."
At the recent meeting of the Ameri-
can, Association for the Advancement
of Science, held in Toronto and there-
fore international in character, the in-
ternational feature was emphasized
by an invitation to Professor Bateson
to come over as the guest of the
American association and the Ameri-

Sigma Xi, honorary scientific fra-
ternity, held its fall initiation at 5
o'clock yesterday afternoon, in room
231 Natural Science building before
the council and other members from
the various departments.
The three men honored by being
taken into full membership wereA
Prof. Louis C. Karpinski, of the math-
ematics departnent, Leon H. Leonian,
graduate student in the botany de-
partment, and Warren Lee McCabe,
'22E. The associate members initiat-
ed were John B. Leighly, '22, of the
geology department, Elmore Shaw
Pettyjohn, '22E, Elton B. Tucker,
'22E, and Joseph T. Woolfenden, '22E.1
ii !t LE U
"PYGMALION" RSERVED
SEAT SALEOPENS10TOOAY
COMEDY CLUB PRESENTS PLAY{
OF BERNARD SHAW JAN. IS a
AT WHITNEY7
Reserved seats for "Pygmalion,"
Comedy club's annual play, go on salel
this morning at Graham's book storeI
on State street. They will be sold
there until next Tuesday morning,
after which they will be transferred
to the Whitney theater.
"Pygmalion," Bernard Shaw's five-,
act comedy, will be given at the Whit-
ney theater Wednesday evening, Jan.
18, -under the direction of Prof. J.
Raleigh Nelson, of the English de-
partment. Special scenery has been
designed for the production and exe-
cuted by O. S. Davis of Detroit, who
painted all of the sets for Sam
Hume's Orchestra association reper-!
tory in Detroit, and the sets for last
year's plays, "Bunty Pulls the
Strings" and "The Importance of Be-
ing Earnest."
Special lighting effects have also
been provided by M. Frake, who did
this work in Mr. Hume's productions.
The make-up is to be done by J. R.
Hirshfield of Detroit. The cast in-
cludes a large number of those who
have been especially prominent in
campus dramatics within the past two
years.

SIGvFA XI HOLDS
FAIL INIIA'TION;

PROF. WILLIAM BATESON
can Society of Zoologists. He is,
therefore, the guest of scientific Amer-
ica. He lectured before several of the
biological socities in session at To-
ronto, as well as bef'ore the large pub-
lic meeting of the American Associa-
tion of Zoologists.
Last week Professor Bateson gave
a course of lectures at the University
of Toronto. The rest of his stay in
America will be taken up with visits
to four universities of this country
where important work in heredity and
evolution is being done. The Univer-
sity of Michigan is one of these four
institutions.
Professor Bateson has written sev-
eral books on heredity and evolution,
and is considered a world authority
on these subjects, as well as one of
the greatest living biologists of the
British empire.
The lecture will be open to the pub-
lic.

i"
CHICGO6 IN GREAT
COMEBACK, 21-16
FAST PLAY MARKS SHOWING OF
WOLVERINES IN SECOND
BIG TEN GAME
MILLER AD S NEW LIFE
TO MATHER QUINTETT
Maroons Present Stellar Floor Work
But Fall to Score Needed
Field Goals

at 4 o'clock today in the Union.
Jiatinee JMusicale
Offers Noted Trio
Ethel Litchfield, pianist, Henr% ,a-
plinski, violinist, and Boris Ham-
bourg, 'cel'ist, will give a concert, un-
der the auspices of the Matinee Musi-
ca'e society, at 4 o'clock tomorrow aft-
ernoon in the assembly hall of the
Union.
This trio is made up of artists, two
of whom already have made a name
for themselves in the musical world,
and the third of whom is consistently
receiving recognition. Mrs. Lawrence
Litchfield is an American pianist of
high standing, who was for some
years a pupil of Theodore Leschetis-
zky and Josef Lhevinne. For several
years past she has made a study of
ensemble work, and has achieved un-
usual success in this field.
Boris Hambourg, who is a member
of the celebrated Hambourg family.
and a brother of Mark Hambourg, the
pianist, is a 'cellist of international
reputation, having successfully toured
America, Australia, and Europe. He
was trained under Prof. Hugo Becker
of Frankfort.
Eugene Ysaye, director of the Cin-
cinnati Symphony orchestra, says of
him, "Since the death of Wieniawski,
I have heard no one who has reminded
me so vividly of that master's playing
as regards poetic interpretation, tone
color ,and rythmic brilliancy."
Mr. Czaplinski is a young Polish vio-
linist, who has just come to this coun-
try. His work is proving increasing-
ly successful-
I CANCEL HOLMQUIST TALK I
t I Miss Louise Holmquist who
I was to have spoken before the
I executive board of the Y. W. C.
1 A. here today wired the organiza-
tion today that she would be un-
able to fill the engagement. No
reason was given In the commun- I
I Ication. 1

PI DELT A EPSILON
INITIATES TQDAY
Advocates of the theory that the pen
is mightier than the sword will give
recognition to those who have shown
themselves worthy of generalship in
the field of words and sentences. Pi
Delta Epsilon, national honorary jour-
,alistic fraternity, will initiate eight
men into its ranks at 4 o'clock this
afternoon at the Union.
YYERS RETURNS FROM ANNUAL
VOCATIONAL CONVENTION
Prof. George E. Myers, head of the
vocational department, has returned
home from the annual convention of
the National Society for Vocational
Education, held Thursday, Friday, and
Saturday of last week in Kansas City.
Transas. During the convention Pro-
+nssor Myers acted as chairman of
+he teachers' training section of the
-onvention. and at one meetin- of tha
Polind Table gave a talk on Method-
-f Teaching in Evening Industrial
Schoo's.
Bes dos Professo" Myers. Miss Cle-
Mirtland. employed in Detroit, and
'Thomas Diamond, emnloyed in Grand
Rapids. both associate professors in
Ihe University vocational education
department, took part in the program.
NEW YORK CENTRAL ENdINEER
WILL SPEAK AT ASSEMBLY
Willard E. Beahan, chief Pngineer o
the New York Central ra'lroad. will
speak on "Human Engineering" at the
"onior engineering assembly at 11
o'clock tomorrow morning.
-TORN C, OTINTITS. '79. SERVED
GOVERNMENT FORTY-TWO YEARS
John C. Onintus, '79. who died Nov
18, 1921, had seen 42 years of serv-
, ice as a United States governmenta
engineer. He became famous som
years ago in using the coffer dam pro
cess to raise sunken vessels.

RECEPTION TO BE GIVEN4
FOR1 FOREIGN STUET
Foreign students on the campus will
be entertained at a reception tonight
at the home of Prof. and Mrs. E. C.t
Goddard of the Law school, at 12121
Hill street. The affair is under the au-x
spices of the Congregational students,e
and will be held from 8 to 10 o'clock.c
This is the third annual reception for i
foreign students which has been given
by the Congregational students.
Besides Prof. and Mrs. Goddard,a
there will be in the receiving line
Mr. and Mrs. Shirley W. Smith, Prof. r
and Mrs. W. R.: Humphreys, Dr. and I
Mrs. R. Peterson, and Mrs. Syril Haas.f
A short program has been arranged. ,
Secretary Shirley W. Smith will give;
an address of welcome. The Martin 1
quartet will render some southernt
songs; Mr. George Wilner, of the or-'
atory department, will give a reading. 1
A solo by Esther Holland, S. of M.,
and a 'cello solo by Mr. M. C. Weir,
will complete the program.
The committee in charge of the ar-
rangements extend an invitation to
every student from foreign lands on
the campus, and are planning for a
large attedance.
SUMMARY OF GAME
Michigan (21) Chicago (16)
Reason .......R.F...........Dickson
Kipke..........L.F..........Roney
Ely ............ C.........I.. H llada y
Rea ...........R.G..........McGuire
Cappon ........ L.G.......... Hurlbut
Score end of first half, Michigan
14, Chicago 9. Field baskets, Miller
i4, Kipke 2, Ely 1, Dickson 1, Hurlbut
1, Romney 1. Free throws, Ely 4 in
11, Miller 3 in 4. McGuire 10 in 15.
Substitutions. Miller for Reason. Rea-
son for Miller, Miller for Reason.
Chicago, Lewis for Halladay, Halla-
day for Lewis, Stahl for Dickson. Of-
fIials, Kearns. Referee,taoi oin nnn
, f6icals, Kearns, referee; Young, um-
pire.
'23E ASSEMBLY TODAY
f All junior engineers will meet
4 in their January assembly at 11 1
, o'clock today in room 348, Engi-
nering building. Prof. A. H.
r White wl speak on the subject.,C
"Muse'e Shoals Power P'ant-Its
l I Possibilities for Peace-time Pur- I
e (poses.
- I

Michigan's basketball team staged
typical comeback last night and de-
eated the Chicago court team 21 to 16.
n a game replete with all the thrills
hat can be crowded into 40 minutes
if play, the two teams fought almost
venly with Michigan having a slight
nargin at all times except for a short
noment in the second half when the
ccurate free throwing of McGuire
ied the score at 16 all. It was not
ong, however, before the Varsity again
rent into the lead and maintained
his position until the final whistle.
Miller Stars
To Bill Miller must go the credit
or the game. This stellar forward,
>esides being the high scorer of the
vening, was by far the outstanding
tar of the contest. Coach M'ather had
feld him out of the beginnii~g of the
Name and did not intend to use him
nless he found it necessary. Miller
ias not yet completely recovered from
in operation on his throat and it was
ot thought that he would be able to
lay until the Wisconsin game. His.
appearance toward the middle of the
irst period seemed to put the neces-
sary pep into the rest of the squad and
when the half closed the score was 14
o 9 in Michigan's favor.,
In this period Miller threw three
goals from the field, which were as
nany as Chicago could get in the en-
tire game. When the second half open-
ed, Coach Mather again held Miller
out, sending Reason into the game at
right forward. When the Maroons
succeeded in tying the score, Bill
again went in and proceeded to make
his fourth field basket. To these he
added three free throws out of four
attempts. With Miller in the game,
he Michigan team was unbeatable.
Chicago did not threaten again and
aside from several long shots from the
middle of the floor did not approach
he basket.
Chicago Plays Fast
For Chicago it must be said that the
team is fast. The men are all quick
on their feet and put the ball into
play with great rapidity. This was
especially noticeable when it was Chi-
cago's toss-in after the ball had gone
out of bounds.
On the other hand when it was
Michigan's turn to put the ball in play,
a Chicago man invariably had the ball
in his hands and held it there until his
men were lined up. This aided their
defense. However, the Maroon de-
fense was in no way comparable to
'hat of the Wolverines. The record of
field goals testifies to this fact. The
best Chicago could do was three bask-
ets, Michigan's forwards put in seven,
Mather's five men defense has yet to
find an equal. Captain Bud Rea was
backaat hisguard position where he
was ably assisted by Cappon. This
pair kept the speedy Maroon forwards
out of striking distance for the most
part.
Teams Plays Consistently
In the matter of attempts at the
basket, both teams fared about evenly
with the Michigan forwards a little
more acurate in their shots. Miller's
work was sensational. Kipke, playing
the entire game at forward, did some
excellent floor work. At the some time
he contributed two of Michigan's sev-
en baskets. His second shot was a
beautiful goal from a difficult angle
at the side. Kipke showed bursts of
speed that wil make him one of the
fastest in the Conference. Ely at cen-
ter played his usual consste t game.
His basket toward the end of the game
came at a most opportune time. To
Rea and Cappon must go the credit
for the low record of the Maroons
from the floor. This is a mighty strong
hair of guards and it will take an elu-
live forward to slip by them.
The result of the game shows the
uncertain element in basketball. Mich-
igan lost to Ohio State Monday night
in a nip and tuck game, 25 to 22. Chi-
cazo on the other had beat the Buck-
eves decisively 25 to 14 on Saturday
"ight. Last night Michigan tied it up
Slthe way round by beating Chicago
121 to 16.

Professor Pleters Attends Funeral
Prof. Adrian T. Pieters, '94, former-
ly instructor in the botany department,
-as in Ann Arbor to attend the funer-
-1 of his eounsin. the late Prof. .Tames
(T. Van Zwalufenberg, of the Medical
school.

r
I

SOPH LITS MEET TODAY
There will be a meeting of the
sophomore literary class at 4
o'clock this afternoon in room
205, Mason hall. Future plans
of social committees will be an-
nounced. All soph lits are urged
to be present.

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