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January 05, 1922 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-01-05

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Th

-F

it-M.-M

OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY
OF MICHIGAN
Published every morning except Monday during the Waiver
sity year by the Board in Control of Student Publications.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use to
republication of all newus dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
credited in this paper and the local news published therein"
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as seconz
class matter.
Subscription by carrier or mail, $3.50.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press building,. Maynard Street
Phones: Business, 960; Editorial, 2414.
Communications not to exceed 300 words, if signed, the sig
nature not necessarily to appear in print, but as an evidence of
faith;'and notices of events will be published in The Daily at tht
discretion of the Editor, if left at or mailed to The Daily office
Unsigned communications will receive no consideration. No mar
uscript will be returned unless the writer incloses postage.
The Daily does not necessarily endorse the sentiments ea
pressed in the communications.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
MANAGING EDITOR ..........BREWSTER P. CAMPBELL
Assistant Managing Editor..................Hugh W. Hitchcock
City Editor................................. E. P. Lovejoy. i7
Night Editors-
R E. Adams G. P. Overten
Edward Lambrecht M. B. Stahl
Hughston McBain Paul Watzel
Editorial Board Chairman.......................T. J. Whinery
Assistants-
S. T. Beach E. R. Meiss
L. A. Kern Leo Hershdorfer
Sunday Magazine Editor................Thornton W. Sargent, Jr
Exchange Editor...............................George E. Sloan
Music Editor................................Sidney B. Coates
Sporting Editor...............-................. George Reinde,
Women's Editor ............................. Elizabeth Vickers
Humor Editor.................................... E R Me s
Assistants
Kingsley S. Andersson L. L. Fenwick B. H. Lee
Maurice Berman Dorothy G. Gelta Robert M. Loeb
Cecil R." Betron H. B. Grundy S E. Mack
ack D. Briscoe Sadyebeth heath Kathrine Montgomery
W-B. Butler. Winona A. Hibbard R. C. Moriarty
R. N. Byers Harry -D. Hoey J. F. Pontius
A. D. Clark Agnes Holmquist Lillian Scher
Harry C. Clark H. E, Howlett R. B. Tarr
j~.P. Comstock Marion Kerr Virginia Tryon
obert W. Cooper L. S. Kerr Dorothy Whipple
Evelyn J: Couglin M. A. Klaver L- L. Yost
John P. Dawson Victor W. Klein J. B. Young
H.A. Donahue Marion Koch
W. F. Elliott George E. Lardner
BUSINESS S TAF
Telephone 960
BUSINESS MANAGER..............VERNON F. HILLER
Advertising..........................F. M. Heath, A. J. Parker
Publication .............................. Nathan W. Robertsor
Accounts...................................John J. Hamels. J;
Circulation...................................Herold C. Hunt
Assistants
Burr L. Robbins Richard Cutting H. Willis Heidbreder
W.. Cooley James Prentiss W. Kenneth Galbraith
L. Beaumont Parks Maurice Moule J. A. Dryer
Walter Scherer .:r in Goldring Richard Heideman
Edw. Murane Tyler Stevens T. H. Wolfe
David Park Paul Blum
THURSDAY, JANUARY 5, 1922.

money to a vacuous, pop eyed matinee hero. When
the expense of keeping, this, pastime going became
too great to be borne, producers sought relief in
soft-pedalling the "star" and putting the director
in the foreground. Even this proved too expensive.
From all indications it would seem that the Amer-
ican public is tired of being experimented upon.
They demand value for their money. American
producers, haunted with the fear of the ever in-
creasing number of well made foreign films, dare
not resist their demands. Some cinema owners have
begun to see the light. At Universal City the em-
ployes (an actor is an employe now) must punch
the time-clock. No longer can thousands of dollars
be squandered merely to give an "effect". Already
the ranks of the motion picture producers arebe
ginning to thin out. It is now a case of the sur-
vival of the fittest.
The time of "easy graft" in the moving picture
business is about over.
It is an encouraging sign.
FEDERAL EDUCATION
Evidently the new president of Illinois, Dr. Davis
McKinley, has no sympathy with a federal depart-
ment of education. "Education is not one of the
matters delegated to the federal government by the
constitution," he said in his inaugural address. "It
is a state function." In another statement he says
that the principle that the state should match federal
appropriations with equal amounts is "vicious".
"This plan contains within itself the germ of a
power that when developed will determine the char-
acter and extent -of our education."
That the national government is encroaching on
the powers of the states has been admitted. A gov-
ernment of states is more or less unstable, even
when changes in such a government are limited by
a written constitution. It is in vitable that either
the nation as a nation, or the states as states, must
have predominating power. And in the United
States the tendency is toward the predominance of
the nation. It is a logical conclusion that if the
states do not fulfill their function of education prop-
erly, something must be done to insure education in
spite of them. A democracy must educate its cit-
izens, there is no doubt of that.
There is perhaps some danger in federal control
of education in that crystallization instead of prog-
ress might be the logical result. But the bill ex-
pressly states that the act is not to be construed as
requiring conformity in the course of study. In-
deed the law does not seem to be aiming at control
at all -it rather seeks to encourage the states in
providing education by aiding them with national
funds.
Certainly there is still much to be done in the line
of educational research and investigation. This the
federal government could well undertake, for a
somewhat similar manner the department of ag-
riculture has proved itself of immense value. On
the basis of this usefulness alone a department of
education could profitably be established.
"What's in a name?" is no joke at the Univer-
sity of Nevada which has more long nick-names
for its athletic teams than it can use, but which has
been forced to go in quest of a short one that fits
better than "Sagabrushers" or Sagehens".
The Telescope
The Lady of the Lake
(Pardon, Sir Walter)
The rain had poured down all the day
It poured and poured to our dismay;
Across the campus slowly walked
(It seemed as if by rain unbalked)
A co-ed, galoshes buttoned high,
Defiiant twinkle in her eye.
Until-she stopped short and did stare-
A campus pool stretched 'fore her there
For aye, it stretched nine yards or more
No isle was there twixt shore and shore.
But still the maiden, undismayed
Walked on again, began to wade!
Another step I saw her take,
Quoth I "The Lady of the Lake".

- Vee Dee.

I. RED"UCTIONS ON ALL IUis
- -R
....m A T ...
GRAHAM'S Both Stores

Night Editor-HUGHSTON M. McBAIN
Assistant-Harold . E Howlett
Proofreaders-Robert M. Loeb
J. F. Pontius
There will be a meeting of the entire Upper Staff
of the Daily at 4:30 o'clock this afternoon.
LAST YEAR'S FACULTY LOSS
As the University begins the year of 1922 two
familiar figures are noticeably absent from the fac-
-ulty ranks, men best known to the medical profes-
sion perhaps, but respected and admired on the
other corners of the campus as well. At the last
meeting of the Regents the resignations of Dean-
Wilbur B. Hinsdale and Prof. Willis Alonzo Dewey
were regretfully accepted.
The withdrawal of these men from active teach-
ing at Michigan cannot help; but cause a feeling of
distinct loss. For nearly thirty years both have
worked side by 'side in the Homoeopathic Medical
school giving their best to prepare Michigan's grad-
uates and make the University pre-eminent in that
science. Dean Hinsdale began his work here in the
early nineties, became dean of the Homoeopathic
Medical school in 1895, and served in that capacity
for more than a quarter of a century. Professor
Dewey's record is only six years shorter than his
colleague's, as he came in 1896. Besides his pro-
fessional activities he has done a large amount of
literary work along medical lines as editor and au-
thor.
By accepting their resignations the Regents have
given each of these men a period of rest earned by
years of untiring service. Unfortunately the acts
of those concerned has been misconstrued by met-
ropolitan newspapers as a sequel to the Medical
school merger. Such a suggestion is without basis
in fact as Dean Hinsdale has been attempting to
withdraw for some years. It is only because of an
appeal made long before the merger agitation be-
came acute that he consented against his personal
wishes to retain his leadership as long as he did.
In view of what these men are and what they have
done for Michigan reflections of this nature are en-
tirely out of place, serving only to cloud unfairly
the careers of great teachers for whose efforts the
campus and alumni feel the profoundest gratitude.
THE MOVIES PUNISH THE CLOCK
Fanny Hurst, according to the New York Times,
interrupted a private showing of a motion picture
version of her novel "Star Dust" with the declara-
tion that the picture was "cheap and tawdry" and
that she would "do her utmost to prevent her name
and the title of her novel being used in connection
with its public appearance".
Fanny Hurst's rebellion may prove to be the
proverbial "last straw".
For some time the storm clouds have been gather-
ing. The movie producers have been anxiously
looking for indications of "what the public wants".
First, it was the star system. One bright producer
conceived the idea of playing up the "star" and was
promptly imitated by his brethren. Soon it became
a race as to which manager could offer the most

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DETROIT UNITED LINES
Ann Arbor and Jackson
TIME TABLE
(Eastern Standard Time)
etroit Limited and Express Cars - 6:oo
, 7:oo a. m., 8:oo a. in., 9:oo a. m. and
rly to o :os p. im.
ckson Express Cars (local stops of Ann
or), 9:47 a. m. and every two hours to
ocal Cars East Bound-5:55 a.m., 7:00 a.
and every two hours to 9 :oo p. mn., t 1.00
To Ypsilanti only-iux:4o p. m., 12:25
n. : is a. in.
SSaline,change at Ypsilanti.
ocal Cars west Bound-7:50 a. M., 2:40
Jackson and Kalamazoo-Limited cars:
10:47, a. in., 12:47, 2.47, 4:47.
Jackson and Lansing -- Limited: 8:47
JANUARY 1922
9 M T W T F S
1 2 3 4 6 7
8 9 10 11 12 13 14
5 16 17 18 19 .20 21
2 23 24 25 26 27 28
34 31
NOTICE TO MEN
'e do all kinds of high-class Hat
rk at pre-war prices. Hats turned
de out, with all new trimmings.
as good as new.
FACTORY HAT STORE
617 PACKARD STREET
Telephone 1792
uy your class toques from Daily
rertisers.-Adv.
TELEPHONE 214 F-1
SEE YOUR PL. MBINGS
DONE IN SEASON-
WIN' R THEN WONT
FREE N'

T HOUSANDS of smokers have proved it-and now
give the verdict to you-
Of all the other tobaccos NATURE has produced
-- none can approach the finest varieties of pure Turkish
for cigarettes--
None has the delicious FLAVOR of the finest Turkish-
None gives the ENJOYMENT of the finest Turkh-
None will SATISFY you as will the finest Turkish-
None but the highest grade and personally selected
Turkish tobaccos is used in MURAD.

i

ICE CREAM
IS JUST AS NOURISHING AND DELICIOUS
DURING THE WINTER MONTHS AS IT IS IN
SUMMER. IT KEEPS YOU IN GOOD HEALTH
THE YEAR 'ROUND

W ELL, it's getting along to-
ward the first of the year
now. You remember that
your heating facilities weren't
what they should have been last
fall and winter and that you
made up your mind that you
were going to have them fixed
last summer and you didn't.
'But you will. Phone 2452.
Ber enak
i& Martin
320 SO. MAIN ST.,
Phone 2452

It Is Rumored
That a New York office building employing
women elevator operators recently discharged one
of the married operators for mixing domestic af-
fairs with business. She is charged with having
used the elevator every now and then to take her
husband down. - Elva Party.
A Ponderous Question
Dear Erm:
If cats don't go to heaven where do the angels
get strings for their harps?
Yours, Minerva Sreck.
Dear Minerva: As it happens, harp strings are
made of metal, but if we are to believe the laboring
class it is evident that the steel magnates don't go
to heaven either,
The Exceptional Case
Student to Professor: I've discovered that blue
and red are complementary colors.
Professor to Student: Absolutely impossible.
Explain yourself.
Student to Professor: Well, when I was home I
painted the town red, and now I'm feeling darned
.blue.
Famous Closing Lines
"Lowering the flag," said the make-up man as he
added a list of new appointees to the staff.
ERM.

i

Your Choice of Any

_______________________________________________________ - , - - fl-'7~"''~ - ' ________________________

Suit or Overcoat
in the Store
$33.57
Lutz Clothing Store
217 South Main

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