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December 16, 1921 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-12-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE WEATHER
SNOW; NO CHANGE IN,
TEMPERATURE

Ak A lr
Lea
AIL FaId&k.
t

~1IaitF

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIRE
SERVICE

VOL. XXXII. No. 70 ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN. FRIDAY, DECEMBER 16, 1921 PRICE FIVE CENTS

BY. OIFFICIALS SAY
RTES DECRESE
IS UNJUSTIFIED
SHRIVER BELIEVES, LOWERING
MAY COME IN NEAR
FUTURE
EVIDENCE PRESENTED
BASED ON STATISTICS
Three Vice-Presidents Give Testimony
Before Interstate Commerce
Commission
(By Associated Press)
Washington, Dec. 15. - Railroad
earnings past and present failed to
justify general decreases of rates,
Ward M. Shriver, vice-president of the
Baltimore and Ohio, Benjamin Camp-
bell, vice-president of the New York,
New Haven and Hartford, and Thomas
C. Powell, vice-president of the Erie,
testified today at the interstate com-
merce commission investigation into
the reasonableness of the present lev-
el of all transportation rates.
Mr. Shtiver, however, speaking for
all the roads as chairman of the ac-
counting committee of the Railway
Executive association, inconcluding
his testimony declared that decreases
might take place "in the not far dis-
tant future." Under the commission's
ruling, cross-examination of the three
witnesses was deferred until January,
when states, municipalities and ship-
pers will be heard.
Mr. Shriver based his conclusions
on statistical presentation, to the ef-
fect that in the 12 months ending
Sept. 3, 1921, earnings of class 1
roads amounted to but 2.75 per cent
on estimated property investment.
Recital Arouses
Yuletide Spirit
(By Sidney B. Coates)
Tired more from excitement than
work and wishing the time to pass
quickly toward the longed for vaca-
-tion one of the largest audiences yet
attending a twilight organ recital, list-
ened to the music of Christmas yester-
day afternoon in Hill auditorium and
went away comfortably happy.
Thoughts on Vacation
With thoughts of the trip home just
24 hours away, with thoughts of class-
rooms to be left empty for two happy
weeks and with a kindly feeling way
down deep for everybody, music, and
yesterday afternoon, organ music by
Earl V. Moore, University organist,
gave .ust the right touch to the "day
before."
"Chirtsmas Musette" by Mailly was
short and happy-a surprise; Bonnet's
"Fantai1e sur Deux Noels," added the
majesty of the Christmas season with
its massive harmonies; Dubois' "March
of the Maji Kings" brought in the
element of mystery and richness
thought of with starlight, gold, frank-
incense and myrrh; and Bach's chor-
ale, "In Dulci Jubilo" showed the
classic master's reverent side.
Last Piece by Handel
Gruber-Harker's fantasy on "Holy
Night, Silent Night" suggested the
long loved carol most beautiful sung
by clear voices in the snow clad night;
"Christmas in Cicily" by Yon gave the
laughter of Christmas in the South,
and last came Handel's "Hallelujah

Chorus" with the joy of thankfulness.
The audience applauded little, but
when the mind rests easy and the
heart is full, real appreciation is in
silence.
FORSYTHE URGES VACCINATION
FOR ALL MISSOURI STUDENTS
Dr. Warren E. Forsythe, director' of
the University Health Service, yester-
day announced that all students liv-
ing in Missouri or vicinity, especially
those living in Kansas City and St.
Louis, be vaccinated if they have not
already taken this precaution before
returning to their homes.
There is a serious epidemic of small
pox in that section of the country, and
quarantines are in effect in certain
cities, barring people from coming
into the community unless they show
the vaccination scar, or proper medic-
al treatment to guard against further
spreading of the disease.

Clements Library
Of Italian Design
With the construction of class rooms
in the Museum building to care for
the sections which have been meeting
in the old Engineering building and
with the staking off of a definite loca-
tion aproved by the Regents the new
Clements library is soon to become a
part of the campus.
The building is of Italian renais-
sance design, two stories high with
a basement, occupying a plot of
ground approximately 80 x 100 feet.
The new building will be located to
the east of the President's home, di-
rectly opposite the Martha Cook dor-
mitory, so that it is necessary for part
-(Continued on Page Ten)
FEB. 10 ANNOUNCED
AS DATE FOR 1-HOP

THE.,vW CLEMENTS' LIBRARY COSTING APPROXIMATELY $175,000 AS IT WILL APPEAR WHEN COM-
PLETED. FROM A SKETCH BY ARCHITECT ALBERT KAHN.
THE CHRISTMAS MESSAGE
If peace on earth, good will to men is the message of Christmas, then we have reason to believe that
we are approaching a very genuine Christmastide. In fact, at the present moment, it appears that the great
nations of the world are coming to understand and to trust one another as never before.
It was a solemn, and beautiful ceremony when the unknown American soldier was buried at Arling-
ton on Armistice day. It was a fitting and impressive prelude to the great conference on Limitation of Arm-
aments. It expressed in the most vivid and vital way not only the nation's sacrifices in war but its intense
yearning that war might be destroyed.
It will be equally impressive if the conference is followed by a Christmas season in which the peo-
ples of the world can honestly rejoice. We seem to be at the beginning of an era in which peace and good
will among the nations are distinct probabilities. The treaty between the four great powers promises peace
in the Pacific for at least a decade. If America's practical idealism expressed in the now famous proposal
for limitation of navies is accepted, heavy burdens will be lifted from the shoulders of the people and the
nations will have found the more excellent way.
The world has never seemed so near to the heart of the Christmas message. That people everywhere

Booth to Be Established in Union
Accommodate Persons Desiring
Hop Information

to

yearn for it no thinking person can doubt. As vie separate for the brief
influence and give our support to those agencies which will help to bring1
and highest aspirations of the statesmen and citizens of many countries.

vacation period may we lend our
to real fruition the fondest hopes
M.L.BURTON.

- I

[I

SUSPENSION OF PUBLICATION
With this issue, The Daily will
suspend publication until Wed-
nesday morning, Jan. 4, 1922.
Owing to the-fact that Jan. 2 is
a legal holiday, the paper will be
published one day later than us-
ual.

1l

WILL
of

SEARCH JUNGLES
S.A. FOR UNIVERSITY

EXPEDITION PLANS TO CAPTURE
BRAZIL FLIES WITH DUST
PISTOLS
New York, Dec. 15.-Equipped with
"dust" shooting pistols to bring down
high-flying insects that cannot be net-
ted, Jesse H. Williamson and John
W. Strohm, a retired army captain,
will sail tomorrow for the jungles of
Brazil. They are carrying 2,000 grains
of quinine, for they plan to penetrate
beyond the River of Doubt, now the
Rio Tedoro, in their hunt for hith-
erto uncaptured specimens for the
zoologicalcollections of the Univer-
sity of Michigan and other colleges.
The expedition is expected to last
six months and will go up the Ama-
zon to Porto Velho, thence along the
Madeira-Mamore railroad 200 miles
into the fastnesses of the Southwest
and the Serra Dos Parecis mountains.
The "dust" shot to be used in gath-
ering dragon flies and other winged
denizens of the fever-infested jungle,
is so fine that the most delicate spec-
imens would not be irreparably injur-
ed, the explorers said.
OPEN HOUSE FOR STUDENTS
AT CITY Y. W. C. A. SUNDAY

1922 UNIO0N OPERA
BEGINS TRIP- TODA 0Y
Performances to Be Staged in Cities of
Four States; Journey to Last
Eighteen Days
FINAL REHEARSAL PERFECTS
CAST AND CHORUS IN PARTS
"Make It for Two", the 1922 Union
opera, leaves at 2:25 o'clock this aft-
ernoon from the Michigan Central
station on the longest trip ever plan-
ned by a Michigan production, con-
sisting of 15 performances and includ-
ing visits to 13 cities in 4 states of the
Middle West. A special train of Pull-
mans will carry the men of cast, chor-
us, and committees, of which there are
more than 100, on the journey that will
last for 18 days and end in Detroit
on Jan. 2, the day before the opening
of school.
A final rehearsal of cast and chorus
was held at the Union theater lastl
night, E. Mortimer Shuter working
until late perfecting the men for their
long series of performances before the l
thousands of Michigan alumni and
their friends that will witness the
show.
Applications for tickets to the road
performances of the opera are still
obtainable by students through the
Union, the blanks being sent direct to
the box offices of the theaters along

Due to the large number of
scenarios submitted in the con-
test under the auspices of The
Daily, the judges have been un-
able to make a decision that can
be announced before vacation.
It is expected that a final an-
nouncement can be made soon
after the reopening of school.
EX-SERVICE MEN URGED
TO REINSTATE INSURANCE
LITTLE EXPENSE NEED BE IN-
CURRED IN RE-ESTABLISHING
POLICIES
Charles H. Mehl, sub-district mana-
ger of the division of vocational re-
habilitation for disabled soldiers, sail-
ors, and marines, urges all ex-service
men who applied for War Risk insur-
ance while in the service, and who
have not let their term insurance
lapse, to reinstate and to convert their
insurance before the expiration of the
tiem limit, Jan. 1, 1922.
No matter how long the insurance
has been in a state of lapsation, only
two months' premium is required of
those who are able to pass a satisfac-
tory physical examination. A dis-
abled ex-soldier who is receiving com-
pensation may reinstate by paying all
the back premiums with interest at
five per cent per annum, provided he
is not permanently and totally dis-
abled.
Any information desired on the sub-
ject may be obtained from the United
States Veterans' bureau, 305 Rogers
building, Jackson.
GARGOYLE TO BE SOLD AT
OUTGOING TRAINS TODAY
With a view to shortening the long
tediousness of travel, the Gargoyle
will be on sale today at all outgoing
trains.
With the sale of 2,000 copies on the
campus and the sales at the various
news stands at normal, the Holidayl
number of the Gargoyle has scored
another success. The Holiday sales
equal those of November.

SCENARIO CONTEST

SUB-COMMITTEES NAMED TO
TAKE CHARGE OF THE WORK
Feb. 10 is the date definitely set for
the J-Hop by the general committee
of the hop which met yesterday aft-
ernoon at the Union. At this meet-
ing sub-committees were also named
to take charge of the work of the af-
fair.
The men appointed to these places
yesterday afternoon were: Ticket com-
mittee, Robert Gibson, chairamn, Coo-
lidge Kreis, and L. W. Kirkpatrick;
program, invitations and favors,
Thomas Lynch, chairman, G. K.
O'Brien, and Harold C. Hunt; music
and refreshments, L. W. Kirkpatrick,
chairman, Edward Johns, and W. 0.
Klingman; decorations, Robert Mar-
tin, chairman, W. A. Gill, and H. P.
Buckingham; information, A. C. Gib-
son, chairman, other members to be
appointed later.
It is requested that anyone having
bids to submit for music or other items
see the chairman of the committee in
charge of that particular item. After
the holidays a booth will be estab-
lished in the lobby of the Union where
all who desire information about any'
phase of the affair may be accommo-
dated. All questions should be asked
at this desk and mot from chairmen
of the committees.
PRES. BURTON TO SPEAK IN
MANY CITIES ON WAY WEST
Will Address Oregon State Teachers'
Association, Returning to
Ann'Arbor Jan. 6
President Marion L. Burton will
speak in every city scheduled on his
itinerary during his western trip, on
which he started Wednesday. On Dec:
20 he will address the Southern Cali-
fornia Teachers' association, at Los
Angeles, and on Dec. 29 he will speak
before the Oregon State Teachers' as-
sociation at Portland.
He will also address Michigan alum-
ni organizations at Denver, Salt Lake
City, Los Angeles, San Francisco,
Portland, Seattle, Missoula, and Min-
neapolis, returning to Ann Arbor Jan-
uary 6.

POWERS REACH
FINL GREEMENT
ONENAVAL PROGRAM
AT END OF TEN YEAR BUILDING
HOLIDAY FLEETS WILL BE
ON 5-5.3 RATIO
FRANCE AND ITALY IN
PACT IS NEXT STEP
Fortifications of Pacific Islands Will
Be On Basis Of "Status
Quo"
(By Associated Press)
Washington, Dec. 15. - The first
great stride toward a five power treaty
limiting naval armament was taken
tonight when the United States, Great
Britian, and Japan announced a final
agreement on the American "five-five-
three" ratio.
The next step-elaboration of the
agreement to include France and Italy
-was initiated immediately within the
Snew committee of 15 Inwhich all five
powers are represented.
Agreements among the three major
naval powers was reached on the basis
'of a "status quo" understanding as to
fortification of the Pacific islands. At
the same time the- United States and
Great Britian acceded 0o Japan's de-
sire to retain her newest battleship,
the Mutsu, with proportionate changes
in the American and British fleets.
Many Changes
While the principles of the original
American proposal were 'not impaired
by the triangular agreement, the set-
tlement contemplated the following
changes in fleets to be retaled:
Great Britian, 20 ships Instead of
22, with an aggregate of 582,050 in-
stead of 604,460 tons.
United States, 18 ships as original-
ly proposed, but with an aggregate of
525,000 tons instead of 500,650.
Japan, 10 ships as originally pro-
posed, but with an aggregate of 313,-
300 tons insteads of 299,700 tons.
At the end of the 10 year building
holiday, the fleets will stand under the
revised detailed plan as follows:
Great Britian, 525,000 tons; United
States, 525,000 tons, and Japan 315,000
tons.
Far Eastern Settlement at Stop
While events as to the naval ratio
agreement were moving swiftly, nego-
tiations for Far Eastern settlement
were at a standstill except for the
separate Chinese-Japanese discussion
of Shantung. A settlement between the
two groups is not yet in sight, and no
date has been set for resumption of
other Far Eastern conversation.
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION CLASS
OF '23 CHOOSES OFFICERS
Officers of the junior class of the
School of Education were elected Wed-
nesday afternoon in Tappan hall. Her-
old C. Hunt was chosen as J-Hop com-
mitteeman from the School of Edu-
cation.
The following officers were elected:
President Herold C. Hunt, vice-presi-
dent, Lyda R. Rideout, secretary,
Florence Butcher, treasurer, Clarence
0. Duncan.

Puffed Cheeks And Shining yes
Portray Kiddies At Yule Party

the route.

Regular tickets will then

be exchanged for them and mailed
back to the applicants. In this way
Michigan students can be assured of
preference in seat sales.
The following are the dates and
towns of the opera performances: at
Grand Rapids tonight, at Chicago Dec.
17 and 19, at Indianapolis Dec. 20, at
Cincinnati Dec. 21, at Lima Dec. 22, at
Cleveland Dec. 23, at Toledo Dec. 24,
at Pontiac Dec. 26, at Port Huron
Dec. 27, at Bay City Dec. 28, at Flint
Dec. 29, at Saginaw Dec. 30, and at
Detroit Dec. 31 and Jan. 2.
Diphtheria Quarantine Lifted Soon
The quarantine on the children's de-
partment at the Homoeopathic hospi-
tal, which has been in effect because
of a few diphtheria cases, will be
lifted within a few days, according to
a report from E. C. Springer, director
of the hospital.

"0, Jimmie, ain't it the berries?"
A long silence during whica time
Jimmie's Jaws work with a machine
like rapidity, while the puffed cheeks
denoting a mouth crowded to capacity
with goodies, threaten to assume such
proportions as to hide altogether that
pair of eyes shining with excitement.
And then the cheeks gradually recede
to normalcy, and a long drawn out
sight of satisfaction denotes that Jim-
mie is now ready to turn his atten-
tion to the much less profitable oc-
cupation of conversing with his neigh-
bor. And even as he does so he keeps
both eyes tightly glued on the bril-
liantly lighted, bespangled thing of
beauty that once was a common pine
tree.
Picture in your mind 250 Jimmies.
equally voracious and equally happy
because 'Santa hadn't overlooked them,
and you have a faint idea of the Christ-

mas party given yesterday afternoon
by the Student Christian association
In Lane hall for the needy children of
Ann Arbor.
And not until the last crumb of those
nmiulti-colored candies and other eat-
ablev so dear to the childish heart
had disappeared, and the last candle
had flickered and died out did the
Jimmies evince any desire of return-
ing to this mundane world peopled- by
self sufficient denizens who would even
have you believe that they have grown
so blase as to doubt the existence of
Santa himself. And when at last he
lid go, casting one regretful look be-
hind him, Jimmie stepped into a car,
donated by some local car owner who
was once a kid himself, and was
whisked to the home whose walls will
look a little less dingy and the fare
just a little bit better as a result of
this transient visit to the Land of
What Might H-ave BAAn.

Mrs. H. O. Whittemore will

read

"Shepherds and Angels" ,from "Ben
Hur", at the "open house" to be held
at the city Y. W. C. A. at 4 o'clock next
Sunday afternoon. A musical program
including Christmas carols, will be1
carried out.
Miss Jeanette Thrift, general secre-1
tary, desires that all girls of Ann Ar-!
.bor and the University attend the af-
fair. Tea will be served.

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