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December 14, 1921 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-12-14

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WEATHER

NO0 CHAIGM
I[PERATURE

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ASWSOCIATE
PRESS
DAY AND NI GHT 'W
SERVICE

VOL. XXXIL No. 68 ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN. WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 14, 1921 PRICE FIVE

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FINAL DECISION,
ON NAVAL PLAN
EXPECTED SOON
CONDITIONAL ACCEPTANCE GIVEN
BY JAPAN TO PROPOSED
RATIO
PACIFIC PEACE TREATY
SICNED BY 4 POWERS
Shantung Negotiations Nearly Reach
Deadlock'After Continued
Conferences
Washington, Dec. 13.-Japan has in-
dicated conditional acceptance of the
American "five-five-three" naval ratio,
and a final settlement of the question
appears imminent.
After another meeting of the naval
"big three" late today it was said that
"one very small point" alone remained
to be determined.
Want to Retain Mutsu
The Japanese acceptance to the
American plan is understood to center
about her desire to retain her new
battleship Mutsu ahd scrap instead a
vessel af older type If she is per-
mitted to do so, it is indicated that the
United States and Great Britain will
insist on similar concessions for them-
selves always in the ratio of "five-five-
three".
While the naval problem was enter-
ing what appeared to be its decisive
stage, another of the big projects of
/ the arms conference was brought to
consummation. The new four-power
treaty to preserve peace in the Pacific
was formally sealed and signed by the
plenipotentiaries of the United States,
Great Britain, Japan, and France.
Reservation in Treaty
-The quadruple agreement as finally
approved, however, has attached to it
a reservation proposed by the Ameri-
can delegates and accepted by the oth-
er powers It provides that no purely
domestic question shall fall within the
scope of the treaty and that none of
the treaty provisions shall be con-
strued as a modification of the Amer-
ican policy towd Pacific mandates, a
subject to be dealt with in a separate
treaty, now nearing completion, be-
tween the United States and Japan.
Meantime indications develops that
in another branch of the Washington
negotiations, concerned with Shan-
tung, things were not going so smooth-
ly. After nearly a dozen meetings in
which apparent progress had been
made,both the Japanese and the Chi-
nese came out of a conference late
today in dampened spirits.
Players Present
Program Tonight
players club will present two one-
act plays, "Sham", by F. G. Tompkins,
and "The Finger of God", by Percival
Wilde, at their December program, at
8 o'clock tonight in Sarah Caswell
Angell hall.
"Sham" will be directed by Henry
D. Goff, '23, and "The Finger of God"
will be directed by Isabel Kemp, '22.
Following the program a reception
will be held in honor of F. G. Tomp-
kins, author of "Sham", at present a
member of the rhetoric faculty of Jun-
ior college, Detroit.
CHARLOTTE SANDS, '91, HURT
IN AUTOMOBILE ACCIDENT

Charlotte Sands, '21, was seriously
injured when the car in which she was
being driven to Ann Arbor skidded and
overturned near Ypsilanti Monday eve-
ning.
Miss Sands was coming from De-
troit to attend theKappa'Alpha Theta
Christmas party when the accident oc-
curred. She was taken to the sorority
house as, soon as the driver, Edward
Thompson, of Detroit, could obtain
help to right the car.
Thompson received minor injuries.
Miss Sands' condition is reported to
be much improved since Monday, when
brain concussion was feared.
Gun and Blade Dance Postponed
Leslie D. Sanford, Spec. Lit., chair-
man of the Gun and Blade social com-
mittee, announced yesterday that the
dinner dance to be given at 8 o'clock
tonight in the Michigan cafeteria by
the Gun and Blade club has been

GIFTS FOR SICK
TO BE COLLECTED
Patients in the University hospital
will have their fun on Christmas day
the same as if they were at home. The
various organizations on the campus
have promised to donate their trees
and other gifts which they may have
left over-from their own parties.
There are many men in the hospital
who could use any cast off clothing
which may be donated. Fraternities
are asked to collect such garments
with the gifts and the trees, and they
will be called for on Saturday morn-
ing.
At least 18 trees are needed if every-
one is to be supplied. Members of
-the University hospital Circle of
Kings Daughters and the Student
Christian association will take them
to the hospital.
ATTENDANCE LARGE T
ANNUUL LAW SMOKER
DEAN DATES CHIEF SPEAKER AT
GATHERING OF 175 MEN
AT UNION
The annual All-Law smoker was
held in the upper reading room of the
Union last night with more than 175
men present. The program was in-
troduced by C. W. Clark, chairman of
the social committee of the senior
class, who was followed by "Tony"
Williams, who gave a solo.
Dean Bates concluded the program
with an earnest talk on the ethics of
the legal profession, emphasizing the
fact that lawyers should be as scrup-
ulous in maintaining their profession-
al honor as they would be in main-1
taining their personal honor.
COMMITTEES FOR
'22 CLASS NAMED
Finances, entertainment, and ap-
pointments to committees were ecn-
sidered at a meeting of the senior lit-
erary class yesterday afternoon in
Mason hall. The treasurer emphasiz-
ed the need of the payment of class:
:ues as the class faces a possible de-
ficit of $1,500. The social committee
.nave planned a class dance from 2:30
to 5:30 o'clock, Jan. 21, at the Union.
Appointments to the following com-
mittees were announced: Clwss day-
J. ,G. Frey, chairman, A. H. Randall.
P. H. Scott, G. D. Sellards, Edna A.:
Groff, Gertrude L. Boggs, and Thelka
Roese; auditing-G. P. Overton, chair-
man, R. D. Patton, Lucille Kilbourn;
promenade-J. A. Berstein, chairman,
C. F. Towar, G. G. Reindel, I. M,
Kemp, and Athalie Hough; sng-O.
W. Rush, chairman, E. M. Beresford,
Marjorie Dean, and Evelyn Rockwell;
:ap and gown-R. S. Peare, chairman,
L. W. Fruess, R. D. Horn; Madelyn
Kirkpatrick, Harriet Johnson; memor-
ial-F. W. Steketee, chairman, S. L.
Sarasohn, Clarence Hatch, Caroline
Napier, and Agnes Holmquist; ban-
quet-W. M. Michaels, chairman, R. A.
Bailey, H. W. Hitchcock, Doris
Sprague, and Margaret Spaulding;
picture-B. P. Campbell, chairman,
R. S. Persing, and A. H. Webster; re-
zeption-R. F. Wieneke, chairman,
L. M. Dyll, F. H. Lee, F. A. Sargeant,
Adele Zimmerman, Euphemia Carna-
han, and Ruth H. Goodhue; pipe and
cane-Walter K. Yesbrook, chairman,
C. H. Stormer, and Phyllis Elliott.
PERE MARQUETTE NORTHBOUND
TRAIN IS NOW DISCONTINUED

Announcement has been made by1
Mr. F. A. Young, general agent of the
Pere Marquette Railway company pas-
senger department, that the train
which left Grand Rapids northbound
at 5 o'clock in the afternoon has been
discontinued from the winter schedule.
Students planning to take this train
must make other arrangements to en-
able them to reach Grand Rapids be-
fore 1:35 o'clock in the afternoon, as
that is the last time at which a north-
bound train leaves the city.
TWO CLASSES IN SCHOOL OF
EDUCATION TO MEET TODAY
Two classes of the School of Edu-
cation will meet today for the pur-
pose of electing officers and complet-
ing class organizations. The senior
members of theSchool of Education
will meet at 5 o'clock in room 203,
Tappan hall, and the juniors will meet
at 4:30 o'clock in room 201, Tappan
hall

BWTTS AND WENLEY
ADDRESS '24E MEN
Soph Enigneers at Smoker Receive
k Commendation From
Dean
-
PHILOSOPHY HEAD STRESSES
NEED FOR CLEAR THINKING
Prof. William H. Butts, assistant
dean of the engineering college and
Prof. Robert M. Wenley, of the philos-
ophy department, were the two speak-
ers at the sophomore engineer smoker
held last night at the Union.
Dean Butts Speake
A short talk explaining the work
that the engineering college was do-
ing and commending the class of '24
on the record it is making in the
school, was given by Dean Butts who
stated that Michigan is now graduat-
ing enginers who compare favorably
with ihose from any other school i
the United States.
Professor Wenley's talk dealt with
the position of the engineer in the
practical world of today and some o
the problems which he has to meet.
He said that the engineering profes-
sion is at present one of the greatest
in the world and is gaining in import-
ance every day. .
Stresses Clear Thinking
He attempted to impress upon his
hearers the necessity for clear think-
ing in the practical world and pointed
out some of the obstacles that enter
the path of unprejudiced though.
These obstacles may arise from en-
vironment such as nationality, birth
br they may come from temperament.
Religion and politics often influence
reason and in order to think correctly
it is necessary to consider problems
abstractly.
Several banjo selections were giver
by George M. Chute, '22E, Charles E
Futch, '23M, Burce C. Davis, '25A
Kent Wright, '22D, and James Glover
'22. A wrestling exhibition wac given
by Thomas W. Moffitt, '23E, and Alex-
ander Boschan, '22E.
ChristmasfMu sic
To Bie Rendered
At Last Recital
Christmas music of France, Ger-
many, and Italy will form the basis of
the next twilight organ recital to be
given at 4:15 o'clock tomorrow after-
noon in Hill auditorium by Earl V.
Moore, University organist. This will
be the last recital until after the hol-
idays.
Many carols and Christmas hymns
of the different countries will be pre-
sented in embellished form in fantas-
ies and offertories. The old Latin
Christmas song, "In Dulci Jubilo
(Bach), the German folk song, "Holy
Night" (Gruber-Harker), several of
the French noels and the English
"Adeste Fideles" are among the melo-
dies intimately associated with the
Christmas atmosphere to be heard
Thursday. The program will close
with Handel's 'Hallelujah Chorus".
EXPECT TO REACH DECISION
CONCERNING SAWYER TODAY
Decision in regard to the motion to
disbar Andrew J. Sawyer, '99L, from
further practice will proltably be
reached today, according to Judge E.
A. Snow, of Saginaw, who returned
recently from a 'conference with

Judges Mandell and Collingwood, of
Detroit,
" The case was discussed Monday by
the judges and a decision will proba-
bly reach Ann Arbor today or tomor-
row morning.
Women Get Office in Alumni Hall
An office will be opened this week
by the Alumnae council in Alumni
Memorial hall through the courtesy of
the alumni. An announcement of the
plans for the University of Michigan
League and a pledge card for member-
ship in the League will be sent to
every alumnus by. January 2, 1922.
Work for the building will be carried
on through this offie with the co-
operation of undergraduate women
and alumnae groups.

Homoeop Alumnus Asserts That There
Is A Place And Need For Homoeopathy
"I have faith in the ability and hon- general belief on the part of the pub-
esty of President Marion L. Burton lic that there is but little difference
and of the Board of Regents, and trust between the therapeutics of the two
that they will decide things satisfac- schools. On the contrary, there is
torily," was the statement of Dr. the greatest possible difference," the
James C. Wood, who graduated from Doctor continued. He. claimed that
the Homoeopathic school here in '79, while there is a general recognition of1
and who is now on the homoeopathic homoeopathic law among leaders of
faculty at Ohio State university, when the profession, the rank and file of
recently interviewed on the Homoeo- members of the regular school know
pathic situation. little or nothing of homoeopathy, and
Questions Practicability care less, many of them being eom-
"I do not believe that the amalgo- plete therapeutic agnostics.
mation of the two schools of medicine Advantages in Each School
at the present time is practical. As a Referring to the possibility of har-
matter of fact there is a partial amal- mony under the merger, Dr. Wood
gamation of the two schools at the said: "No teacher of'homoeopathy
present time, the fundamentals in both could or would work in an atmosphere
schools being the same. There is a uncongenial and antagonistic. What
I would like to see accomplished is a
ruling on the part of the Regents
compelling the students of both de-
partments to take the materia medica
and pharmacology of both departments
and pass on the same. There Is no
school of medicine that is the deposit-'
of all truth. 'The work of the physic-
FINAL ACTION WILL BE TAKEN Ian Is so big, so broad and so Import-
AT MEETING THURSDAY ant that all means of cure promisin
NIGHITthe slightest value to sick and suffer-
Ing humanity should be the common
Most of the members of the J-Hop property of all physicians."
committee who were present at the

LAWTON, '11, TO LEA
CHEERS AND SING

ov

meeting of the committee last night
favored holding the hop in the spring
instead of Feb 10 as has been sug-
gested by the deans committee. The
final date was not decided upon at
this time but will be definitely deter-
mined at the next meeting of the com-
mittee Thursday night.
Either tuxedoes or full dress will
be permissable at the hop but flowers
have been banned.
Appointment of the various sub-
committees will be made at the next
meeting Thursday night.
CLAVEL LECTURES;
TO CERCLE-TODAY
M. Marcel Clavel, of the French de-
partment, will lecture in French at
4:15 o'clock this afternoon in room
203, Tappan hall, on "L'Etudiant
Francais", under the auspices of the
Cercle Francais. All persons interest-
ed are invited to attend.
He will take up his subject from the
standpoint first of the French stu-
dent's studies, and second his mode
of life. M. Clavel is a graduate of the
University of Paris, where he receiv-
ed his diploma of Agrege-es-Lettres.
Members.of the society are asked to
present membership cards at the door.
News of the- Day
IN BRIEF
Belgrade, Dec. 13.-The National As-
sembly tonight ratified the treaty of
peace betwen the United States and
Hungary.
Baltimore, Md., Dec. 13.-Thousands
of shopmen employed on the Baltimore
and Ohio railroad will be furloughed
indefinitely Saturday when shops over
the entire system will be shut down.
Washington, Dec. 13. - Basic busi-
ness and financial conditions through-
out the country have been improved
greatly during the past year, but
"normalcy" is yet to be attained, Gov-
ernor Harding, of the federal reserve
board, declared tonight in an address
here before the Washington Chamber
of Commerce.
"It is my sober conviction," he
said, "that basic financial conditions
in this country are very much better
than they were 12 months ago. Busi-
ness has passed through the primary
stage, the acute period of reaction, but
it has not yet reached 'normalcy', for
the readjustment has not been uni-
form, and there is not yet established
a natural and equitable basis for the
exchange of goods for goods, or goods
for services."
Washington, Dec. 13.-The attitude
of Democratic senators on the Pacific
four-power treaty for the time being

INSIG'NIA WILL BE
.WARDED GRIDME
AT MASSMEETU
ACTION PICTURES OF FOOTB.
SQUAD HAVE CHIEF PART
ON PROGRAM

Mratinee Program
Contains JMusic
Of Noel Season
Christmas music will make up the
next program of the Matinee Musicale
society at 4 o'clock this afternoon in
the assembly hall of the Union. It has
been decided to do away with the busi-
ness meeting planned before the pro-
gram and the afternoon will be devot-
ed entirely to music.
The complete program is as follows:.
a. Good King Wenceslas...Traditional
b. Coventry Carol...Arranged by J. S.
c. While By My'Sheep..........
....Seventeenth Century Hymn
Carol Chorus
Sonata No. 11 Op. 13..........Grieg
(For violin and piano)
Anthony J. Whitmire
Lorinda S. Clifford
a. Rejoice Beloved Christians:.....
. Schroeter
b. Jesus, Thou Dear Babe Divine
Traditional Cradle Song from
Hayti

Talks by Yost, Dunne, and Goebel t
Complete Entertainment
Tonight
Coach Fielding H. Yost's movies o
the Varsity gridmen in action at the
big games and in practice scrimmage
will feature the entertainment at the
annual mass meeting called -by the
Student council for the purpose o:
awarding insignia to the members o:
the different athletic teams, which wil
commence at 8 o'clock tonight in Hil
auditorium.
AigIer to Award Letters
Besides the movies and the forma
awarding of the insignia by Prof
Ralph W. Aigler, of the Board in Con
trol of Athletics, there will be en
tertainment and thrills aplenty with
the speeches, songs, and yells which
are scheduled on the program. Coach
Yost, Captain "Duke" Dunne, an
Captain-elect PaulkGoebel, of thi
Varsity football team, w,.ll speak o
the subject, "How It's Done".
J. Fred Lawton, '11, of Detroit, com
poser of "Varsity"l,1a says that he .ha
something that he wants every stu
dent at Michigan to hear. Mr. Law
ton, besides giving a speech, will lead
the meeting in singing. The Varsity
band will be on deck to start th
meeting off and play several numbers
Thomas E. Deweyk '23, of the Schoo
of Music, will be' the soloist for th
evening. -
Council Sponsors Meeting
The Student council with C. H. Da
ley, '22L, as chairman of the meeting
is the sponsor of the event and Var
sity "M" men, Varsity reserves, All
fresh football men who have earne
numerals, and cross country men wh
have earned honors will be the guest:
for the evening.
Gargoyle Tickles
Literary Palat
Students with a taste for better lit
erature will find their literary palat(
tickled by the Holiday number of th
Gargoyle, which appeared on the cam
pus today. The bits of deftly don
prose combined with the sublimity o
poetry make the Gargoyle one of th
most representative magazines on th'
campus.
"A Drunkard's Curse"*is a graphic
realistic, soul-stirring depiction o
the terrible, inescapable misfortune
which followed a poor unfortunat
who owed his downfall to his first ic
cream cone. The misguided inebriat
ends his recital of pity with a nerve
shaken, quavering request for anoth
er chocolate parfait.
Followers of things theatrical wi
be interested in "The Log of a Choru
Girl" which is, as the author so trite
ly puts it, "the diary of a chorus gir
who fell off the water wagon one nigh
and off the stage the next."
There's a touch of thrilling roman
in "The Rise and Fall of Susan Snow
which deals with the heroic though in
effectual efforts of the campus van
to enter the Union by the front dooi
"A Christmas Carousal" is a start
ling clever burlesque on -Dickens
"Christmas Carol" "Fear Not; fo
Tomorrow We Perish" is a touchin
little sketch realistically done Th
long lost son arrives home - just i
time to save his poor old mother fro
breaking up her wooden leg for fue

a.
I).
c.

Triple Quartet
Adagio, Op 34 .........A...... Ries
Valse Bluette........Drigo-Auer
Ungarischer, Op. 29........
...........Nischka-Hauser
A. J. Whitmore

Ave O Maria ...............Zandonal
Triple Quartet]
ORDER OF DE MOLAY TO HOLD
FIRST CONVOCATION TONIGHT'
Order of De Molay, newly organized
lodge of Ann Arbor, will hold its first
convocation and installation of offi-
cers at 7:15 o'clock tonight in Patten-
gill auditorium of the Ann Arbor high'
school. Both degrees will be exempli-
fled by the chapter, and 25 candidates
will be initiated into membership. '
: Delegates from all the chapters of
the state as well as from many near-
by states will be present to witness'
the work as exemplified by the offi-
cers here.
LEAGUE PARTY TO BE GIVEN
FOR GIRLS WHO REMAIN HERE
All University women who will be
in Ann Arbor for the Christmas vaca-
tion will be entertained at a party at
4 o'clock Friday afternoon, Decembe-
16, at the Cheever dormitory. A
Christmas program will be given. All
girls who expect to be in Ann Arbor
during the Christmas vacation are re-
ouested to sign up in the blue book
in University hall or in Barbour gym-
nasium before noon today.
ALUMNI OF DETROIT HIGH
SCHOOL ARRANGE MEETING
Alumni of the Detroit Eastern high
school will hold a meeting at 8 o'clock
Thursday night, Dec. 22, at the high
school building. Following the meet-
ing there will be dancing with Burke's
orchestra furnishing the music.
Sigma Delta Chi Meets
An important meeting of Sigma Del-
ta Chi will be held at 7:15 o'clock to-
night at thA nion

'ENSIAN NOTICE

All campus organizations are
requested to have their group
picturesfor the *Michiganensian
- taken between Jan. 3 and 28.
Since there will be absolutely no
1 extension of time. It would there-
fore be advisable for the organ-
izations to arrange for sittings
I with their photographers before
1 going home for the Christmas
holidays.

will be one of silence, some of their
Mandolin Club Meets Tongiht leaders declared today after a can-
A rehearsal of the Mandolin club vass of the situation. The Democrats,
will be he'd in the Union tonight. The it was explained, desired to avoid dis-
roon announcement will be posted on cussion which might interfere with the
th hnullatin honr armaments cnfrene

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