100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

December 13, 1921 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-12-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE WEATHER
PROBABLY SNOW
TODAY

Yl r e

i t'

aiti

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIRE
SERVICE

VOL. XXXII. No. 67

ANN ARBOR. MICHIGAN. TUESDAY, DECEMBER 13, 1921

PRICK FIVE ICEINTS'

F ,. .... ..

NEW COMMITTEE
NAED TO SOLV
NAVALPROBLEMS
OLD BODY SCRAPPED FOR GROUP
OF FIFTEEN IN CHARGE OF
FINAL REPORT
AMERICAN OF FICIAL
SEES GOOD PROGRESS
Sec. Hughes, Arthur Balfour, Admiral
Kato Meet to Discuss
Program
Washington, Dec. 12. - Machinery
to expedite the action on naval agree-
ments was set up today by the Con-
ference. At the suggestion of the
American group, the former commit-
tee of experts was "scrapped" in fav-
or of a "committee of 15" including
both plenary delegates and civil and
naval experts of the five powers. The1
whole subject of naval limitations, in-
cluding the cornerstone, "five-five-
three" ratio was turned over to the
new committee to be put in final shape
for the Conference.
The "big three" of the naval con-
ference, Secretary Hughes, Arthur J.
Balfour and Admiral Baron Kato, met
today and are understood to have con-
sidered the naval ratio problem, but
no announcement as to what occur-
red at the meeting was gained. They
will confer again tomorrow and it was
regarded as probable that they were
taking up the program for delibera-
tion of the "committee of 15". In the
light of instructions Baron Kato has
received on the "five-five-three" pro-
posal, how long it might take to work
out the details of the treaty on the
subject, no official would predict. One
American official said matters seem to
be rapidly "coming to a head".
Santa To Attend
Children 'S Party
Santawill be here Thursday after-
noon. From definite word received
from his workshop far north, it has
been decided that his headquarters are
to be Lane hall, and is guests the
children of Ann Arbor who have been
invited to attend his party.
Maynard A. Newton, '22, chairman
of the committee in charge of receiv-
ing His Highness Santa, has planned
a most wonderful party. There are to
be dances and recitations and music,
and, what is far more important, there
has been received from Santa's own
kitchens the most wonderful assort-
ment of candies and a beatuiful sup-
ply of ice cream.
Nelson Joyner, '23, has been in
charge of the financial side of the par-
ty and hetreports thatsthe boxes for
contributions will remain under the
Christmas tree on the campus. Sev-
eral fraternities and sororities have
not yet signified their willingness to
entertain one or more of these tots.
FOWLER, BRIDGE
BUILDER, TO TALK
Charles Evan Fowler, prominent
bridge engineer in the United States
and Canada, will speak on "The Evol-
ution and Architecture of Bridges" at
7:30 o'clock tomorrow evening in Na-
tural Science auditorium. Mr. Fowler
has about 200 slides which will illus-

-trate the phases of the subjectr he in-
tends .to cover. "
Mr. Fowler will be remenmbered as
the designer and chief engineer for the
new Detroit-Windsor- bridge, soon to
be constructed over the Detroit river.
He will also build the world's largest
bridge from San Francisco to Oaklan'
a structure more than 6,000 feet long
with three spans each 2,000 feet in
length. The public is invited to at-
tend the lecture.

STUDENT AFFAIRS'
COMMA TEE NAMED
President Marion L. Burton has ap-
pointed as members of the reorganized
Senate Committee on Student Affairs,
Prof. Louis A. Straus, of the English
department, Prof. Evans Holbrook, of
the Law school, and Dr. Rollo E. Mc-
Cotter, of the Medical school.,
Dean Myra B. Jordan and Dean Jos-
eph=A. Bursley are ex-officio members
of this committee while Dean Bursley
will be its chairman.
LIGHTEN BERG MADE-
FO&TBALL MANAGER

CULMASS MEETING

Varsity Athletes Will Be
Honor; Letters, to
Awarded

Guests
Be

of

New Head

Has Served Grid
tion for Two
Years

Organiza-

MAY NOT PICK ASSISTANTS
BEFORE VACATION BEGINS
Announcement was made yesterday
of the selection of William G. Lichten-
berg, '23, as football manager for the
coming year. The choice was made
Saturday but the announcement was
withheld in the hope that the assist-
ants' for the year could be announced
at the same time.
It has been customary to an-
nounce the manager with the assist-,
ants, the latter requiring the approval
of the board of directors of the Ath-
letic association. At the present time
it is uncertain whether the selection
of the assistants can be made before
the coming vacation, and it is more
of an uncertainty whether the board
can meet to confirm the selections be-.
fore that time. Announcement of the
assistants will be made as soon as
possible.
Lichtenberg, this year one of the as-
sistants, has worked with the staff of
management for two seasons. His ef-
ficient work was declared responsible
for his selection.
PROF. BARNOUWSPEAKS
ON DUTCHITERATUE
HOLLAND SCHOLAR TO DISCUSS
NATION'S RENAISSANCE
ART TODAY
"The tragedy of small nations is
that their literary gift is not accepted
because their truly representative
works are not interpreted," said Dr.
A. J. Barnouw, Queen Wilhelmina pro-
fessor of Dutch language and litera-
ture in Columbia university, speaking
on "Contemporary Dut ch Literature"
yesterday afternoon in Natural Sci-
ence auditorium.
Dr. Barnouw described the main
currents through which the literature
of his country has been running for
the last 30 years. The first school
of modern literatur,e he said, resem-
lled the Renaissance of the seven-
teenth century.
Dr. Barnouw will deliver an Illus-
trated address on, "Art and Artist of
the Seventeenth Century," at 4:15
o'clock this afternoon in Natural Sci-
ence auditorium. The last lecture in
the series will be delivered at 4:15
o'clock tomorrow upon "Holland's Co-
lonial Expansion."
Holiday CGargole
On Sale Tomorrow
With a burst of color that would
rival the polychrome coat of Joseph
and a flash of wit that Don Marquis,
F. P. A., et al., might well envy, the
holiday number of the Gargoyle will
make its sprightly bow to the campus
tomorrow.
The three color cover, by Elmer G.
Wellin, '23, entitled "A Christmas
'Eve'', represents pajama-clad inno-
cence armed with a glowing taper and
a yawning stocking, waiting in wide
eyed expectancy for Santa.,
The frontispiece, "a Ia Gibson", is
so realistic that the only difference
between it and one of Gibson's is the
paltry hundreds of 'dollars that Gib-
son gets
"Ye Olde Tyme Opera" deftly dem-
onstrates how the opera was present-
ed in the days when a man had to
have his clothes removed with a can
opener and his pants Dathed with a

MOVIES OF FOOTBALL TEAM
IN ACTION WILL BE SHOWN
Varsity "M" men, Varsity reserves,
All-fresh football men who have earn-'
ed numerals, and cross country men
who have earned honors will be the,
guests of honor at a mammoth mass
meeting to be held at 8 o'clock tomor-
row night in Hill auditorium under'
the auspices of the Student council.
All athletic honors will be formally
presented to the men on the different
teams by Prof. Ralph W. Aigler, of
the Board in Control of Athletics.
Coach Fielding H. Yost, Captain
Dunne and Captain-elect Goebel of the
football team will tell "How It's
Done". Coach Yost's movies of the
Varsity gridders in action at the big
games and of the men In practice
scrimmage will be shown in the'
course of the program.
J. Fred Lawton, '11, composer of
"Varsity", will be present to lead the
meeting with some songs. Efforts are
being made by the Student council to
secure the Varsity band to furnish the
music and several surprise entertain-
ment numbers are on the program. It
is hinted that the "Midnight Sons
quartette" will give some selections.
HENDERSON SPEAKS AT
LAST SERVICE OF YEAR
GOOD SIZED AUDIENCE PLEASED
WITH CHRISTMAS MUSIC
AND ADDRESS
Christmas music, well rendered, de-
lighted a large audience Sunday eve-
ning in Hill auditorium. Mrs. Wil-
liam Wheeler and Mr. George Clancy
were the soloists. Mrs. Wheeler sang
Gounod's "The Light from Heaven"
with violin obligato by Mr. Clancy.
Mr. Clancy played "Romance" by
Svendsen.
Prof. William Henderson, of the Ex-
tension service, spoke on "The Spirit
of Christmas". It was not, as Pro-
fessor Henderson said it would not be,
a regular conventional Christmas talk
with Santa Claus and other worn re-
minders of Christmas, but rather a
plea that the United States, now the
richest country in the entire world,
should. prove itself big enough to step
forward and help provide the coun-
tries of Central Europe and Russia
with the much needed stores of grain
and food.

HOMOEOPS lNSIST
Staff Members Believe Amalgamation
Will Be Unsuccessful, Making
k'Annihilation
FACULTY WILL NOT CONTINUE
WORK UNDER PROPOSED PLAN
Members of the staff of the Homoe-
opathic Medical school have not chang-
ed in their attitude toward the amal-
gamation of the two medical schools
since the decision of the Board of
Regents last week. They contend that
the amalgamation cannot work suc-
cessfully, and that the proposed ac-
tion will mean complete annihilation
of the Homoeopathic school. They be-
lieve,'however, that the fight has not
yet been finished, and that there is still
a possibility that the proposed merger
will not go through.
I Support Promised
Dr; Copeland of New York and other
prominent men throughout the country
have expressed themselves as willing
to do anything within their power to
help maintain the Homoeopathic
school as it has been run in the past.
Faculty members are almost unani-
mous in saying that they will not at-
tempt to continue their work under
the amalgamation plan, but will leave
the employ of the University upon the
termination of their contracts.
Students Will Leave
Students, it is reported, have also
declared that they will discontinue the
study of homoeopathy at Michigan un-
less they can get the training under
conditions as originally provided for
when they entered.
FACULTY MUST P9Y
TO SEE COURT GAMES
ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION CORRECTS
MISUNDERSTANDING OF NEW
REGULATION
Faculty athletic books cannot be
used for admission to basketball
games,'it was declared by officials of
the Athletic association who are in
charge of the sales of the basketball
tickets.
There has been some misunderstand-
ing, it is said, faculty members think-
ing that they did not have to purchase
the tickets for the contests. No ad-
mission will be granted to the games
except on the presentation of the
tickets which went on sale the first
of last week.
Sale of the tickets is slowingup
somewhat and there is but a slight
possibility of the entire lot being dis-
posed of before the vacation. A number
bought tickets for both groups Friday,
Saturday and yesterday, and others
took advantage of their opportunity to
purchase their second lot of tickets.

LIBRARIAN BISHOP
TO RETURN TODAY
Librarian W. W. Bishop will arrive
in Ann Arbor at 8:12 o'clock this
morning, direct from Europe, where he
has spent three months buying books
for the Library. Mr. Bishop landed
from the steamship "Baltic" late Sun-
day afternoon. While absent he vis-
ited England, Belgium, Holland,
France and Germany, and succeeded
in obtaining many valuable volumes
needed in the Library collections.
CONS6HT IDEURNRE
Committee Investigates Water Course,I
Financial Possibilities, and
Student Sentiment1
OPINION OF EXPERTS SOUGHT
AS TO FEASIBILITY OF POND1
Three phases of the question of
making rowing a formal sport at thes
University are being investigated by
the committee in whose hahds the
matter was placed by the Board in
Control of Athletics, following the pre-
sentation of the petition at their meet-
ing Saturday.
Ducharme is Alumni Member
The question of the practicability of
using Barton pond, the only available
body of water near Ann Arbor; for
the purpose of holding practices and
regattas is being considered by Charles
?3. Ducharme, alumni -member of the
board. The matters of finances and
competition is being considered by
Coach Fielding H. Yost. Prof. William
H. Frayer, of the history department,
is investigating the sentiment among
the students to determine whether
there is strong enough support to
warrant the inauguration of the sport.
Mr. Ducharme, who is investigating
the, possibilities of the making of a
course at Barton pond, is a member
of a number of boat clubs in Detroit,
and has made a study of water sports
events. It Is his purpose to bring to
this city a number of men who have
had experience in the sport and who
would be able to say whether the pond
would make a suitable place for the
holding of a meet.
Coach Yost Assists
Coach Yost will make a complete
study of the financial possibilities of
the sport and determine whether or
not the cost would be either excessive
or unwarranted. He will also determ-
ine the possibilities of competing with
other colleges having crews.
The sentiment of the student body
will be sounded out by Professor Fray-
er who will report at the next meet-
ing of the board whether the sport
will be supported as shown by the
ndications at the present time.
Opera' Blanks

EXTRA SERVICE
FOR XMAS RUSH
SPECIAL TRAINS, ADDITIONAL
COACHES ARRANGED
FOR WEEK-END
REVISE SCHEDULES
FOR STUDENT EXODUS
Wabash Orders Car for Students Who
Go to St. Louis or Other
Cities Enroute
Homeward bound students will be
given every opportunity to reach
their destination at the earliest possi-
ble hour from Friday noon until all
have reached home in many states.
This is indicated by extensive prepara-
tions which are being made by rail-
road companies whose lines touch,
or connect with, Ann Arbor, to han-
dle the Christmas exodus.
Ann Arbor 4ervice
The Ann Arbor railroad has added
a special train which will leave Ann
Arbor at 12:40 o'clock (Ann Arbor
city time) Friday, Dec. 16, and will
arrive in Toledo at 1 o'clock, making
no intermediate stops. This train will
be run in order to insure Toledo con-
nections.
Train No. 52, which is scheduled to
leave Ann Arbor at 5:30 o'clock (city
time) will not leave until 6 o'clock
on Friday, in order that all students
having afternoon classes may have
ample time to make it. Motor train
No. 14, leaving Ann Arbor at 3 o'clock
(city time) ond arriving at Toledo at
3:45 o'clock (central time) will be
converted into a steam train.;All those
desiring reservations beyond Toledo
should make application in advance to
the Ann Arbor ticket agent.
Reservations Being Made
Students have been appearing at the
Michigan Central station regularly up
to the end of last week for the. pur-
pose of reserving accommodations on
the trains leaving Ann Arbor Friday,
it was declared by A. J. Wieselogel,
station master for the Michigan Cen-
tral railroad yesterday.
Requisitions for special cars have
been sent in to the main passenger of-
flee and all those who have already
purchased tickets and made Pullman
reservations can be taken care of
without any difficulty, the station
agent declared. Special cars will be
run to main points in the East and
Middle West, and a special train to
Chicago will leaveat 1:23 o'clock Fri-
day afternoon.

I f

l
3
1

Detroit Symphony, With.Pinist,
Pleases Audience In Second Concert

(By Delbert Clark);
audience which heard with delight the
"Tremendously successful" was the '
Detroit Symphony orchestra and Er-
win Nyiregyhazi, pianist, last evening,
in Hill auditorium. Every number was{
a success, and received unusually
generous applause.
Those who came expecting to see in
the 17-year-old Hungarian pianist a
long-haired, wild-eyed erratic were
no doubt badly disappointed, as he
gave the appearance of an' Ann Arbor!
school boy in evening clothes. Victor
Kolar, conducting the orchestra, dis-
played perhaps a little too much of
nervous energy, his frantic gesticula-
tions rivalling those of Victor Her-
bert.
Mr. Nyiregyhazi played Liszt's first
concerto for piano and orchestra in E
flat major." Particularly remarkable
were the last two movements, alle-
gretto vivace, and allegro marziale
animato. In the first of the two the
young genius' tireless magic fingers
wove and interwove a fairy dance, but
fairy feet never danced as did they,
and in the final movement the compo-
sition came to a powerful, crashing
climax.
Particularly noteworthy in the or-
chestra numbers were t'he stirring~

andante maestoso, allegro vivace
movements in Tschaikowsky's Fifth
Symphony in E minor. The program
came to a mighty close with Enesco's
Roumanian Rhapsody in A major,
after the ballet music from Gounod's
"Faust" The concert was without
doubt one of the best ever given in
Ann Arbor by the Detroit orchestra.
Barristers to Hear Professor Riggs
Prof. Henry E. Riggs, of the civil
engineering department, will speak be-
fore the bi-monthly luncheon of Bar-
risters, senior law honorary society, at
the Union this noon. Professor Riggs'
subject has not been announced.
"PEACE ON EARTH;
GOOD WILL TO MEN!"

Are Available
At Union DeskJ
Students who desire seats in any of
the theaters in which "Make It For
Two," the Union opera, plays during
its Christmas tour, should obtain ap-
plication blanks at the Union.
Many students hate tried to ob-
tain tickets directly through the Un-
ion. Application blanks must be se-
cured first, however, and the students
must send these to the respective the-
aters, where exchanges will be made
and the tickets mailed back to the ap-
olicants.
Opera officials urge that members of
the Union particularly take advant-
age of this method of securing tickets,
thereby receiving preference over the
general public in the distribution of
seats.
PROF. WENLEY TO ADDRESS
SOPH ENGINEERS TONIGHT
Prof. Robert M. Wenley, of the phi-
losophy department will speak at the
sophomore engineer smoker to be held
at 7:30 o'clock this evening in the
Union assembly hall. Dean Mortimer
E. Cooley, of the engineering college,
has promised to attend if possible.
The banjo quintette and Varsity
quartette have been secured to furn-
ish music for the occasion.. Boxing
and wrestling will be on the program.
There will also be "eats" and smokes.'
Tickets may be secured today above
the egineerg rco1r from members.

Accommodations Offered
A special car for students who are
leaving Ann Arbor for St. Louis or
points enroute has been arranged by
the Wabash railroad. The car will
leave on the Ann Arbor railroad at
an early evening hour Friday and will
make connections onto the male line
of the Wabash at Milan. Full sleep-
ing arrangements will be afforded,
and accommodations can be made at
the present time.
Students who wish to travel to
points to the southwest may secure
more information on the subject by
calling C. P. Wilcox, agent for the
road, either at the Union or at t he
Allenel hotel.
LAWS TO HEAR DEAN BATES
AT SMOKER THIS EVENING
All laws are invited to the All-law
smoker, an- annual event for all the
classes, to be held at 7:30 o'clock to-
night in the Union. Dean Bates, of
the Law school, and the presidents of
all the classes will give addresses. An
orchestra will provide music during
the evening, and refreshments will
be served. Tickets are 50 cents each,
obtainable from the social committees
of the various classes.
SENIOR LITS MEET
There will be a meeting of the
senior literary class at 4 -o'clock
this afternoon in room 205, Ma-
son hall. At this time commit-
tee appointments will be made,
plans for class social funtions
will be discussed and other mat-
ters of importance taken under
consideration.
WALTER B. REA, President.

HOLIDAY NOTICES

Notices of all events to take
place during the Christmas holi-
days must be in The Daily of-
flee by 7 o'clock Thursday eve-
ning, Dec. 15, in order that they
may appear Friday morning in'
the last issue of The Daily before
the holidays.

From the green, snow covered
boughs of the solemn evergreen
which stands in front of the Lib-
rary, a little west of the diagonal,
came this message last night,
twinkling from a hundred elec-
tric bulbs with which the Stu-
dent Christian association had
decked the campus Christmas
tree yesterday. The tree will be
illuminated every evening of the
present week.

i.
i
i

1
I
,.

i

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan