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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

December 10, 1921 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-12-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE 'WEATHER
CLOUDY AND
SOMEWHAT WARNER

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AbP1Aq

j5Iait4

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY' AND NIGHT WIll)
SERVICE-

VOL. XXXII. No. 65 ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1921 PRICE FIVE C

ORDER

MEDICAL

SCHOOL

MERGEL

FOFT9I A~W N[Y rLUMNI TODAY
DETROIT GRADUATES HONOft
GRIDIRON SQUAD AND
PROFESSOR

ALL STUDENTS INVITED
TO TONIGHT'S EVENT
Theater Party, Banquets, Smoker
Among Entertainments on
Program
Prof. Robert M. Wenley and the Var-
sity football team, together with the
scrubs and reserves, coaches and as-
sistants, the All-fresh team and the
Varsity band, will be the guest of
honor at the annual football "bust"
of the Detroit University of Michigan
club today.'
The reception to Professor Wenley,
whom the alumni style "the fighting
philosopher", is in recognition of his
twenty-fifth anniversary in the- serv-
ice of the University, and also as an
appreciation of his active interest in
all student affairs, especially in the
athletic situation.
Leave on Special Cars
Special cars will leave the D. U. R.
station here at 1:05 o'clock this after-
noon, and the Varsity band will meet
at the'Delta at 1:10 o'clock. It is es-
pecially urged by the . committee in
charge of arrangements that students
who plan to attend the affair leave on
these special cars. The cars will ar-
rive at the Hotel Cadillac in Detroit
at 3 o'clock, when the band with an
escort of mounted police will lead the
team, coaches, trainers .and students
to the Madison theater, where they
will be guests of John H. Kunsky, the
owner, who hasarranged a special
program.
After the performance Professor
Wenley, Coach Yost and his assistants
and the team will attend a banquet at
6:30 o'clock at the University club.
Other members of the party will dine
at the Board of Commerce building.
Like Monster Pep Meet
At 8 o'clock a smoker will be held
in the Board of Commerce. Profes-
sor Wenley, Coach Yost, "Duke"
Dune and Paul Goebel, Varsity cap-
tain-elect, will be the principal speak-
ers. Varsity cheerleaders and the
Varsity band will combine to give the
place the appearance of a monster
pep meeting in Hill auditorium.
Robert H. Clancy, chairman of the
publicity and theater committee, ha
issued a special invitation to all stu-
dents to attend the affair. Tickets
may be purchased in Detroit at Sop-
er's cigar store in the Dime Bank
building or at the door, the price be-
ing $1.
S C A. CHISTMS FUN
NETS ONLY_350 SO FAR
Only $50 have been contributed so
far toward the S. C. A. Christmas party
for poor children which will be given
next Thursday. As It Is necessary to
have at least $150 in order to give the
party, boxes will be placed on the
campus again Monday so that stu-
dents who failed to give anything to-
day will have another chance to con-
tribute.
"If students will only realize how
happy a small contribution will help
to make the poor children, I am sure
that we can get the required amount
Monday," said Maynard Newton, '22,
chairman of the committee in charge
of the party, last night.

IAGREEMENT ON PACIFIC
TO BE REACHED TODAY
(By Associated Press)
Washington, Dec. 9.-The four
power agreement to govern con-
ditions- in the Pacific as a sub-
stitute for the Anglo-Japanese
alliance will be announced at a
plenary session of the Washing-
ton conference at 11 o'clock to-
morrow.
The question of naval ratios,
it was said tonight by the foreign
delegations' spokesmen, will not
be taken up rat the meeting, at(
least directly although it is un-I
derstood that its relation to the
proposed agreement is held to
be vital.
FOURTH SHOW OF
OPERA SCORES HIT
Numbers Carried Through in Manner
to Satisfy the Most
Critical
DANCING AND COSTUMES ARE
STRIKING FEATURES OF SHOW

(By Thomas F. Dewey)
From the brilliant, varied dance that
gave the 1922 production of the Mich-
igan Mimes, "Make It for Two", a
sendoff which would satisfy the most
critical fojlower of Mr. Ziegfield's pro-
duction, to the stirring lines of "The
Victors", at the close, the fourth night
of the show went through its spectac-
ular numbers last night with a snap
which lagged seldom, and which car-
ried the production into the lasting
memories of every member of the
audience.
Most striking in the show is, of
I course, the costuming, of wihch Les-
ter can well be proud. Such scenes as
I "Garden of Girls" and the final de-
nouement which breaks into a laugh
at the tragic, "Betrayed!" of Nemo
the king, will give this year's opera a
prestige on the road for splendor not
equalled by many of the productions
on the road today.
The dancing :this year is the best
ever shown in an opera, without ques-
tion, with the Dagger Dance in the
last act as the most striking and pro-
fessional act of the show. The songs
and rythmical music of Cyrus N. Ta-
vares, '24, and Dwan Y. Tang, '24E,1
who, decked In iative costume, open-
ed the second act with the most unique
scene of the evening.
Mtasques Play
Is Presented Asel.b z a Op n
Bazaar Opens
Christmas atmosphere of the crowd-
ed opening of the Women's league ba-
zaar reached its height at the beauti-
ful Christmas play, "Why the Chimes
Rang", given by Masques last eve-
ning In Sarah Caswell Angell hall.
The four speaking parts of the play
were well taken, but the great force
of the piece lay in the exquisite ca-
thedral scene - an unusual feature
that was impressive in its splendid
seting and beautiful patomine. Alto-
gether this year's Christmas play was
a distinct achievement for Masques,
and the credit for which belongs to
Prof. J. Raleigh Nelson, and the com-
mittees which staged the production.
The bazaar will be held all day to-
day.

U.S. MUST INSIST
ON ENFORCEMET
EXECUTIVE CLEMENCY PROBLEM
IS DIFFICULT, STATES
EX-GOVERNOR
OBEDIENCE ESSENTIAL
TO NATION'S EXISTENCE
Efforts to Protect Innocent have Led
to Loopholes for Guilty, Says
Speaker
That the people of the United States
or any other nation must stand for
and insist upon strict adherence to
and enforcement of law If they are to
exist as a nation, was the keynote of
the address delivered by Charles S.
Whitman, former governor of New
York, who spoke on "The Administra-
tion of Criminal Justice" last night in
Hill auditorium.
"It is not only enactment of law
which we must consider, but also its
enforcement, for the success of which
all social and legal forces must
unite," declared Mr. Whitman.
Illustrating his lecture with inci-
dents from his own experiences as a
judge, prosecuting and district attor-
ney and finally governor of the state
of New York, Mr. Whitman proceeded
to show that no matter how careful
and judicious our courts try to be,
justice is not always meted out to the'
guilty.
"We have gone so far in our efforts
to protect the innocent," he said, "that
we have formed many loopholes and
outlets whereby the guilty can escape.
I believe in being merciful to the
criminal, but I do not believe in being
merciful to crime."
(Continued on Page Eight)
RTS MEET CONSIDES
TOCAIOfNAL TRAINING
MYERS-TO SUMMARIZE PROGRESS
IN FINAL SESSION
TODAY
Fred C. Whitcomb, of Miami uni-
versity, Oxford, 0., opened the second
day's proceedings of the Manual Arts
conference with a discussion of "The
Manual Training Teacher's Part in
Stimulating the Creative Impulse."
Mr. Whitcomb said that as the nation-
wide scheme of vocational education
develops it behooves educators to see
that the creative impulse during the
adolescent age is provided with an out-
let.
I. S. Griffith, professor of vocational
education at the University of Wis-
consin, addressed the afternoon ses-
sion oni relations between the depart-
ments of economics, sociology and vo-
cational education in the university.
The conference will close this morn-
ing. Prof. George E. Myers, of the
School of Education, will summarize
recent progress in the education of
vocational training teachers.
DR. M. S. RICE SPEAKS AT
WESLEYAN GUILD BANQUET
Dr. M. S. Rice, pastor of the North
Woodward Methodist church of De-
troit, was the principal speaker at the

fifteenth annual banquet of the Wes-
leyan guild last night in the Methodist
church.
Paul Rehmus, '23, and Augusta
Avery spoke for the undergraduates.
Prof. John R. Brumm, of the Journal-
ism department, acted as toastmaster.

Miller, Rea, Ely, Show Up Well
Year's First Basketball
Tilt

in

TREATY SEEMS CERTAIN
MAJORITY FOR IRISHETI
(By Associated Press)
Dublin, Dec. 9.-The Sinn Fein,
following the revelation of a
clique in the Dal Eireann cab-
inet over ratification of the
Anglo-Irish treaty, yielded to a
more calm attitude here tonight.
There seems to be ground for the
belief' that Arthur Griffith, who
headed the delegation which
signed the agreement in London,
will have a sufficient following
at the meeting of the Sinn Fein
parliament next Wednesday to
insure ratification of the agree-I
ent by a substantial majority.
D EFEATS NORMAL

WIN FROM WESTERN STATE
NORMAL BY SCORE OF 26-15
In the opening basketball game of
the season last night in Waterman
Gymnasium Michigan's Varsity court
team defeated the Western State Nor-
mal five by a score of 26 to 15. Coach
Mather's opening lineup contained but
two veterans of last year's champion
team, Captain Rea and Miller.
Although the first half was not char-
acterized with the dashing play which
carried the Wolverines td a triple tie
for first place last year, the second
period was marked by faster play on
the part of both teams. Michigan's
conservative play in the opening
period netted Mather's men an eight
point lead as the Wolveriens were
leading 14 to 8 when the whistle blew.
On the whole the Wolverines played
a strong game, using the five-man de-
fense and depending largely on long
shots. Captain Rea's close guarding
and clever floor work kept the Nor-
mal five from threatening. Ely's play
was one of the features of the con-
test. The new tip-off man played a
strong defensive game in addition to
scoring three baskets, while Miller
(Continued on Page Eight)
CONCERT MONDAY
HAS NYIREGY1HAZI
WITH SYMPHONY
Edwin Nyiregyhazi, the brilliant
Hungarian pianist, and the Detroit
Symphony orchestra, Victor Kolar
conducting, will give the next concert
on the Extra Concert series at 8
o'clock Monday night in Hill audi-
torium.
This pianist is arousing much in-
terest in America not only for his ex-
traordinary ability, but also for his
interest in American institutions and
customs. As soon as he arrived in
America he began a study of the Eng-
lish language and now speaks it
quite fluently.
Nyiregyhazi, like other pianists,
holds a large amount of insurance on
his hands. As a result of a slight ac-
cident to one of the 18 year old ar-
tist's fingers, his manager recently has
taken out an insurance policy for $50,-
000 on his two thumbs and eight fin-
gers.
Japan Has Severe Earthquake
Washington, Dec. 9. - The most se-
vere earthquake of the past 20 years
today struck Tokio, according to un-
official advices reaching the Japanese
embassy here. No deaths were re-
ported.

MICHIGANENSIAN SPACE
Campus organizations wishing
to reserve space in the 1922
Michiganensian must pay for that
space by this afternoon, due to
a ruling of the Board in Control
of Student Publications. Men
will be in the Michiganensian
office from 9 to 12 o'clock and
from 1 to 4 o'clock today for the
purpose of receiving such pay-
ments.
The Michiganensian manage-
ment has expressd itself as thor-
oughly appreciative of the man-
ner in which holders of space
contracts accepted the advance
in space rates.
LEAGUE OBTAINS SITE
FOR WOMEN'S BUILDING
REGENTS CONDITIONALLY GRANT
BLOCK OPPOSITE HILL
AUDITORIUM
The University of Michigan League
site grant will be the block bounded
by North University avenue, Washing
ton street, Twelfth street, and the
Mall, according to announcement made
yesterday by the Board of Regents to
the executive committee of the Alum-
nae council.
This grant was made with the fol-
lowing conditions: The land at the
corner of North University avenue and
Twelfth street will not be cut off
for purposes of straightening Twelfth
street, there being a possibility that
the street will be straightened by wid-
ening the block; the women's gymnas-
ium will not be located on 'the Mall;
this proposal is made with the under-
standing that the'Alumnae council will
be in a position to proceed with the
building within a period of five years;
it is understood that the building may
be located 10 feet nearer the axis of
the Mall than Hill auditorium.
Further conditions are that the
wuilding will cost approximately $750,-
000, and if not, that the Board of Re-
gents will be consulted before the
Alumnae council proceeds to contsruct
The building. The plans in any case
will be submitted to the Board of Re-
gents for approval. It is also under-
stood that the policy in regard to
buildings for women will be to locate
them north of the campus.
SATURDAY OPERA
TICKETS GO FAST
Tickets for the Saturday night per-
formance of "Make tI for Two", are
going fast. Due to the poularity of
this year's production, it was found
necessary to hold a special Saturday
night performance in order to meet
the large demand for tickets. No ex-
change of seats for the afternoon
show will be made In favor of the
evening. Anyone desiring tickets for
this performance must apply at the
box office of the Whitney theater.
Tap Room Entertainment Tonight
The regular Saturday evening en-
tertainment will be given at 11 o'clock
tonight in the Union tap room. Music
will be offered by the Quadrangle or-
chestra, and J. E. Duffy, '24E, and
C. . Hill.1d

WOOD AND COPELAND PRESEN
POSITION OF HOMOE-
OPATHS
MEASURE PASSES WITH
ONE DISSENTING VOTI
Abolition Rather Than Amalgamatie
Urged by Former Faculty
Men
Consolidation of the Homoeopathi
Medical school with the Medical co
lege was authorized by the Board o
Regents yesterday afternoon in th4
following resolution: "It Is the sen
timent of the Board of Regents tha
the twq medical schools be . consol
idated and that the committee here
tofore appointed be directed to make
report in detail at the next meetin
of the Board."
The resolution came as the culm:
nation of a thorough airing of th
facts in the case, characterized b
heated discussion at the hearing give
the homoeopathic physicians of th4
state at the Union yesterday morning
Burton Presides
President Marion L. Burton presic
ed over the meeting, which was al
tended by more than 300 people, Tb
homoeopathic physicians were repre
sented by Dr. Ames G. Wood, c
Cleveland, and Dr. Royland Cope
land, health commissioner of Nem
York city, both former members of th
homoeopathic faculty and graduate
of the school.
Both speakers insisted that in thel
opinion it would be far better for th
homoeopathic school to be completel
abolished than for it to be amalgamal
ed with the Medical college. "If w
haven't something worth while w
don't want you to teach it," said Dr
Wood. It was insisted that the schoc
had not been given a fair chance t
prove its worth, and that the so-calle
old school physicians were determin-
ed on destroying the homoeopaths.
Support Not Lacking, Says Gore
Regent Gore presented the opinion
that "the work of the homoeopathi
school has been grievously disappoint
ing". This, he said, was not due t
lack of co-operation on the part o
the Board of Regents, as he knew per
sonally that all possible assistance in
moving ahead had been given th
school by the Regents. He said, "W
must rebuild, reconstruct, go forwar
in a strong way to justify our exist
ence. He pointed out that during th
year just past about $47,000 had bee:
spent on the school and only seven
students were graduated from it, in-
sistingthat the school was not show
ing sufficient results to justify th
present policy toward it.
At this point request was made t
know where the resolution passed b
the legislature originated, and th
P resident replied that it was intro-
duced by Dr. Townsend, of Jackson
(Continued on Page Eight)

REGENTS INDORSE CONSOLIDATION
HETED H~qN TT DISCUSSION MARKS SESSIO

I

II

i

SCENARIOS DUE TODAY,
Scenarios for the University
movie must be turned in to the
secenario editor, of The Daily
before 6 o'clock tonight,
the hour when the contest closes.
Any received after that time can-
not be accepted, as the judges
must start work immediately on
grading the plots. A decision
will be announced as soon as
possible.

_ - " . i . n l 9
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No Tickets
Exchanged
for Matinee
Performance

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Extra Performance "Make It For Two'"
TonightWhitneyTheatre,8:15
Your last chance to see the show in Ann Arbor

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The Biggest
Opera Made
Necessary
Another
Performance

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