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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

December 06, 1921 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-12-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY TUESDAY, DE

I

KODAK FINISHING

Flashlights and
Outside Groups

EASTMAN KODAKS AND -FILMS
7N.ITAVLEiTD 1905
719 N. UNIVERSITY

craft bo-ard at _1W7shington uring the!
war. He is now president of the Stout
M R H NUMBERS0 craft board atc(shingt duingltthe1
Lngineering lahor'atories, Detroit, and
is engaged in the construction of giant
all metal planes for the United States
I fA Ia e the war Mr. Stout was chief
Audience Responds Enthusiastically designer, then sales manager for the
To Varsity Band's Sunday Scripps-Booth company, and chief en-
Concert -ineer of the aircraft division of the
Packard Motor car company. He found-
MASS SINGING OF OLD SONGS te Aerial Age, and has been on
PROVES POPULAR TO AIINY the technical sta s of several publi-
ctions, mnctding the Chicago Tribune.
M'.otor Age, - nd Automobile.
(By Sidney B. Coates)
A march is a band's special property
and the Varsity band led by Capt. W- 1 ITiSSTM I
fred Wilson of the School of Music !E
faculty, demonstrated this fact adair- gPL[ F f lI
zbly in its concert Sunday afternoon in I: .iL qL P
Hill auditorium. On its program of
seven numbers, three were marches, STUDENTS ESOND WEL1 SAY
each bringing an enthusiastic response mI DOUIAS, CAMPAWIN
from the audience. In fact, Sousa's DIRECTOR
"Jack Tar" march and Weldon's "Gate
PCitv'' b iiht cih rlnm that thw

y T
thcy make content
they gratify
because they are
Jn'coM-pa-a-My fine
Tended in the Good 0d English Waj

S

Y

I

Frank Bros.
Fifth benue oot Shop
New York

.u.. . y --_

__..
.. . .. . ;:w

EXHIBIT at

I

I

Wild & Co.
All This Week

TIH RAZOR THAT,
SHARPENS ITS OWN BLADES

QUM

uiuy ' orougm suer applause a Lney
wero repeated.
The other numbers on the program,
however, showed the difficulty which
music written primarily for the or-
chestra brings when it is adapted to
band instrument possibilities. A band
is an organization connected with large
gatherings out-of-doors such as a
parade or a football game, and when
it seeks to entertain indoors with mu-
sic designed first for the orchestra, un-
'ess the members of the band are ex-
perts on their respective instrumpnts,
the result is apt to be somewhat in-
coherent. Of the orchestral numbers
rendered, the most successful were
Nesvadba's "Die Loreley" (Para-
phrase), Opus 17, and Offenbach's
minuet and barcarole from the "Tales
of Hoffman."
Between the two sections of the
band's program came mass singing of
some of the well known religious, pat-
riotic and folk songs. The singing, in
spite of the average American's mod-
esty about singing with his fellows in
public, was entered into with some
vim, esperially by that group of peop'e
to whom the songs brought up memor-
ies of times past. The singing was
led by George Oscar Bowen and ac-
companiments played by Frank L.
Thomas, both members of the School
of Music faculty.
AVIATION EXPERT
SPEAKS TONIGHT
"Recent Developments in Airplanes,"
wil be the subject of a lecture by Wil-
11am B. Stout, of Detroit, at 7:30
o'clock tonight in the Union reading
room. The talk, under the auspices
of thte Aeronaurical society, will be
open to th:i public.
Mr. Stout is considered a foremost
authnriisy upon aircraft and mechani-
ei engineering. He acted in the ca-
pacity of '.* l.i ical adviser to th Aii-

Sale of Christmas stamps at one cent
each and healt, bonds at $10 each is
progressing rapidly in Ann Arbor, ac-
ord-ng to Mrs. Tenry Douglas, who
is in charge of the campaign in this
city. Peo1e in genera?, she believes,
'ave resX-(d well, the response of
the University students being unusual-
ly comm dable. An ng girl's dormi- - Spots
with a purchase of 700 stamps, Helen r
^wbrry ad M rtb'a Cook tying for
?econd With 500.
The money collected in the local
campaign, which is uder the direction -WE CALL FOR AND DELIVER-
Sthe >d ticual Thberculosis associa- -
t-cn, wil be turre'd over to the st ate-
committee which will use it for the
right against tuberculosis.
T e association maintains in hos-
pitals and in the state sanitarium
(liberenlar patients who are without -
mnds for their care. It also provides
money for X-':y p hotography, windowa
tents, and loping porches all of
which are neoded in fighting the dis-
ease. T o .ork of the association is
necessitated by thd l:ack of provis'on-
on the rart of the state for funds with N' ea r
which the disease may be fought. A nlArbors Master Cleaners
Haie you sent ht your scenario for -
the Lniersi ty mo vie yet?
Patronize our Advertisers-Adv.se
Try a Daily Want Ad. It pays.-Adv'
CHRISTMAS Greeting Cards
Stationery andt Gifts
an unusually desirable selection
TSUDENTS SUPPLY STORE
-1 I I SO. UNIVERSITY AVE.

Z-7-1p

Silver plated razor, strop, year's BUPj3Ly

Silver plated razor, strop, year's uppz
pf blades, in compact case, $5.00
A Christmas gift for mE
N ten seconds a man gets a freshly
stropped blade with this razor. Morning
after morning he enjoys the same comfortable
shave. The Valet AutoStrop Razor strops,
shaves and cleans without removing the blade.
Saves money on blades every month in the
year. Come in and ask for a demonstration
today. It will settle one or more of your gift
problems. A variety of attractive sets $5.00
to $25.00.

Just a few strokes
on the strp-the
blade is keen s 4am

"The Quarry
G. Claude Drake, Prop.

i

'
,

- -1 77i

_h

$7 .00

d M ft ' yr Ram
0.00
, r+'

Q

IN COLD

- FOR THE BEST-

IN COLD

{'

STORY OR PHOTOPLAY SCENARIO
WRITEN FOR THE

$r
a month
buys this Corona
Corona is the original portable typewriter with the
exclusive patended folding feature-the most convenient
typewriter in the world.
1 Writes in sight. 4. Withstands the knocks
2. Weighs but 6'/2 lbs. and bumps of travel.
3. Folds to only 3 in. 5. Is dependable-rarely

1!e st

~' .
M1; ,
.W a.

otest

--NOW BEING CONDUCTED BY "THE MICHIGAN DAILY"

ches high. need adjustment.
Fold it up - take it witeyou - typewrite anywhere

0

Phone or vite for free demonstration
D. D. MORRILL, 17 NICKELS ARCADE

ARE YOU WRITING
- YOUR STORY? -
THERE ARE COUNTLESSw
TJIOUSANDS OF PEOPLE
YEARNING TO WRITE,
WHO REALLY CAN AND
SIMPLY HAVEN'T
FOUND IT OUT!
MOST ANYBODY CAN
TELL A STORY.
WHY CAN'T
MOST ANYBODY
WRITE ONEI
NOW IS YOUR
OPPORTUNITY!1
DON'T WAIT, START
YOUR STORY
TODAY!

3. The writer's name and address must be on the
upper left hlnd corner of the first page of the man-
uscri pt.
4. Manuscripts not accepted will be returned only
if self-addressed and stamped envelopes are en-
closed.
5. Manuscripts will be judged by competent
judges picked by The Daily and the producers.
6. Two prizes will be awarded, the first of $50
and the second of $25.
7. Manuscripts should be addressed to The Daily
in care of the scenario editor.
8. The contest closes at 6 o'clock Saturday night,
Dec. 10, 1921.

RULES OF CONTEST

1.
8 x
must1
2.
sible
story.

All manuscripts must be typewritten on white
11 inch pper. Original copies, not carbons,
be submitted.
Manuscripts should be written as short as pos-
but fully explaining situations and detail of

A FEW SUGGESTIONS
1. A scenario is the deser iion of the action of
a story in its proper~ order, but not necessarily di-
vided into scenes of giving the detailed action.
2. Don't forget that the heart and soul of the
scenario is its story. That is the great thing, the
essential thing, and the all important thing about
the scenario. If the story is a fascinating thing of
heart-interest, clean romnance, adventure or mystery,
then your scenaro is good at heart.
3. Storis of a dramatic type are desired. Drama
makes a nore definite appeal and is easier to por-
tray than comedy or farcial comedy.
4. Avoid "slap-stick" and gross comedy situations.
5. Avoid sex themes or situations developed on
the worn-out subject of the "eternal triangle."
6. Remember that language cannot be photo-
graphed, therefore avoid lengthy description. The
story must be one of action, one which may be vis-
ualized.
7. Portray your characters concisely and at all
times be consistent in the development of your
theme.
8. It is suggested that the story be based on
some plot which revolves around the University.

I

COnZO14A
The Personal Writing Machine
MAIL THIS COUPON

Remember this contest is open to all students of the Univer-
sity with the exceptions of the "Michigan Daily" Editorial
and Business Staffs.

V

I

Without obligation to me, please demonstrate a
Corona and explain your $5 a month payment
plan.
Address*................... ..................

r
iI
t

1~.~.

NOTE:-Any students who are considering submitting scenarios and who desire any further infor-
mation can interview the producing company's representative at the publications reading room, second
floor of the Press Iuilding, from 2 to 4 o'clock any day except Saturday.

SOMEONE IS GOING TO WIN -IT MIGHT AS WELL BE YOU
Contest Positively Closes at 6:00 O'Clock Saturday Night, Dec. 10th, 1921

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