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December 02, 1921 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-12-02

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THE WEATHER
RAIN OR SNOW AND
COLDER TODAY

AqW AV*
tr

til

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WI
SERVICE

VOL XXXIL No. 58 ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2, 1921 PRICE FIVECE

FEDEfRL CONTROL
G8RT PROBLEM
SAYS MCKNE

ILLINOIS PRESIDENT WARNS
DANGER IN INAUGURAL
SPEECH

OF

PRESIDENTS AND DEANS
ATTEND CONFERENCE
Chief Threat Is to State Autonomy in
Education, Hearers Are
Told
(By Associated Press)
Urbana, Ill., Dec. 1. - The onward
sweep of the growth of federal con-
trol is the most important question of
internal administration before the
American people today, Dr. Davis Mc-
Kinley told an audience .of educators
following his inauguration as presi-
dent of Illinois university tonight.
The listeners were presidents and
deans of most of the important col-
leges; and universities who are here
attending a conference on the rela
tion of federal government to educa-
tion.
"The onward sweep of federal power
is breaking down our state authori-
ty," said President McKinley. "The
invasion of federal authorities is ad-
mitted. Education is not one of the
matters delegated to the federal gov-
ernment by the constitution. It is a
state function.
"Some of the new proposals now in
consideration involve the vicious prin-
ciple that the state would match the
federal appropriation with equal
amounts. This plan contains within
itself the germ of a power that when
developed will determine the charac-
ter and extent of our education."
BlOSRAPHICL SKETCHES
ITEN IN NEW ALUMNUS
Biographies of two famous Michigan
alumni are the chief articles in the
issue of the Michigan Alumnus, those
of Charles B. Warren, '91, ambassa-
dor to Japan, and Frederick W. Stev-
ens, '87, of the Chinese Consortium,
being given.
Mr. Warren, in addition to being
an authority on international law,
distinguished himself by service on
the draft board during the war, the
success of the conscription measures
being largely attributed to his patient
and conscientious work.
Mr. Stevens has placed on his shoul-
ders-the principal responsibility in un-
tangling the Chinese financial rela-
tions as they concern the United
States. He may also be remembered
as a man who took a great active in-
terest in the Union building cam-
paign.
Prof. Clarence T. Johnston, of the
surveying department and director of
Camp Davis, has written an article in
which he traces the development of
the camp and tells some incidents
from the life of the late Prof. J. B.
Davis, after whom it was named.
Reading Vy Clark
Effectively Done
(By E. Coughlin)
The audience received a rare thrill
when Prof. S. H. Clark, of the Uni-
versity of Chicago, read Drinkwater's
"Abraham Lincoln" last night in Hill
auditorium.
The reader's spiritual understanding
of the thought of the play and the
tonal beauty and positive firmness of
his voice made the delineation one of
unusual appeal and impressiveness..
Professor Clark interpreted the
characters of the drama with exqui-
site skill and handled his materials
with the reticence and balance of an
artist.

Stanley Chorus Plans Matinee Dance
A matinee dance will be given by
the Stanley chorus from 2:30 until
6:30 o'clock tomorrow afternoon, at
the Armory. Fischer's orchestra will
furnish the music. Tickets for the
dance may be obtained at either'
Wahr's or Graham's bookstores for 50
cents. The proceeds will be used for
the spring trip to be taken by the

Dance At Union
Revives Custom
A practice that has been discontin-
ued for a number of years will be
revived tonight when the Union gives
the first of the formal dances for
general membership that are planned
for the year. No such affair has been
given since the war, which caused the
dances to be discontinued some time
ago, and none has ever been given in
the new Union building.
All who attend the dance tonight
will be expected to appear in formal
attire, either- tuxedos or full dress be-
ing appropriate. A number of spe-
cialties have been arranged for the
evening and some extra pieces will
be added to the regular Union orches-
tra.
STATE CONFERENCE1
COMMENCES TODAY
Representatives of Fifteen Michigan
Colleges Attend Christian
Callings Meeting1
REGISTRATION STARTS THIS .
AFTERNOON IN LANE HALL'
More than 140 students represent-
ing 15 Michigan collges, in addition
to a large number of University men,
are expected to register this afternoon
in Lane hall for the opening session
of the State Christian Callings con-
ference for college men.
After the registration and assign-
ment to, rooms in the afternoon the
meetings will open with a banquet inE
the Methodist church. Dr. H. R.
Chapman, of the Baptist church, who
is general chairman of the confer-
ence, will be the presiding officer.t
President Marion L..Burton will speak
on "The Challenge of Religion". Dr.
Charles W. Gilkey, pastor of the Hyde
Park Baptist church of Chicago, will
take the topic, "The Opportunities for
Religious Leadership", and Bishop
W. P. Remington, of South Dakota,,
will talk on "The Joys of the Minis-1
try".
Saturday's program will consist of
meetings at 8:30, 9:30, and 10:45
o'clock in the morning and at 1:30 andl
2:30 o'clock in the afternoon. Ac-
commodations for the visitors under
the direction of S. R. Black, '24, are
being arranged on the Harvard plan,
which provides room and breakfast
free. A few more accommodations
are neede to take care of everyone
and it is requested that anyone who
can keep one or more men over night
phone Louis Reiman at Lane hall.1
BURTON DELIVERS ADDRESS ,
BEFORE EDUCATION FACULTYt
Teaching Profession as Important as
Xfedicine and Engineering,
Says President
President Marion L. Burton, in his
talk to the faculty of the School of
Education yesterday afternoon, sai
that a new emphasis was being placed
upon the importance of teachers and;
teaching.1
He made this point to make clear the
importance of the School of Education,
as a part of the University. He pointed,
out the dangers that lie in the path
of a new department of this kind and,
told them that mistakes that were,
made in this first year would count
heavily against the ultimate success

of the School of Education.-
He compared the first year of a new,
institution to a man's first year ofj
college, the freshman year, and added ,
that it was as likely to be frought with
dangers and trials. President Burton
ended his talk by saying that it must
be impressed upon the public that the
teaching profession is as of much im-
portance as medicine or engineering.
BANQUET GIVEN FOOTBALLa
SQUADS BY CONOPUS CLUB
Conopus club members entertained the
whole football squad, the Varsity,
scrubs, freshmen and coaches last eve-
ning with a chicken dinner at the
Union. After the dinner, Prof. A. G.
Ruthven, of the zoology department,
acted as toastmaster and introduced
Dean E. H. Kraus, of the Summer
Session, who gave an address of wel-
come. In the absence of Coach Yost,
Tad Wieman responded. Dunne spoke
f,., fh,, foa.m

OPERA COSTUMES
NEARLYALL HERE
Brilliant Designs Contained in Last
Consignments Received at
Union Theater
SEATS FOR GENERAL PUBLIC
NOW ON SALE AT WHITNEY
With more than three-quarters of
the costumes for the 1922 Union opera,
"Make It for Two", already in Ann
Arbor and the rest promised for Sat-
urday by Lester, the Chicago design-
er, this year's production of Mimes
is rapidly being rounded into final
shape, in readiness for the first Ann
Arbor performance at the Whitney
theater next Tuesday, Dec. 6.
The gowns have been arriving at the
Union theater for the past three weeks
in small consignments, but this week
the receiving rooms of the building
have been nearly swamped by the in-
coming boxes of new creations, fresh
from the shops of the designers. The
remainng costumes are due to arrive
in town next Saturday, when Lester
will arrive in person to supervise the
fitting of the gowns.
More than 230 gowns have !een,
contracted for by the opera ianage-
ment for "Make It for Two", all of
them being the original creations of
Lester, who is declared to be the fore-
most designer of theatrical costumes
in the Middle West. They range all'
the way from simple dresses to bril-
liant Oriental and ball room costumes,
with complicated color schemes and
startling designs.
Gowns of Many Colors
Formal gowns for the ball room
scenes in the first act, at the home
of the Houghtons of Long Island, con-
tain the most original and daring de-
signs of the opera, according to E.
Mortimer Shuter, director. Bright
reds, greens, oranges, and blues,
mingled with nearly every other con-
ceivable color, add brilliance to the
array of spangled costumes that line
the walls in the director's offices.
More than 300 pairs of special
shoes are included in the boxes that
are scattered about the floor of the
Union theater. One feature provided
by the designers is the set of shoes
for the clog dance, made in patent
leather and provided with an original
clicking device in the heel.
Tickets Going Fast
Tickets for the opera were placed on
sale yesterday to the genral public at
the box office of the Whitney theater.
According to opera officials, the'
tickets are going fast and should be
purchased at once, if good seats are
desired. The sale will continue un-
til the first performance on Tuesday
night.
DECISION GIVEN
ON SAWYER CASE
AT LATER DATE
Trial for disbarment of Andrew J.
Sawyer, Ann Arbor attorney, ended
at 4:15 o'clock yesterday afternoon at
the county court house; and the deci-
sion of the judges was reserved until
a later date, in accordance with the
custom on such cases. It will proba-
bly be announced .within a week, ac-
cording to Claremon Pray, deputy
county clerk.
More than 600 people crowded into
the court room yesterday afternoon

to hear the final round of the first
disbarment trial in Wa.htenaw coun-
ty. The court was opened at 1:45
o'clock with Attorney Edwin Shields
speaking for the defense. His plea
lasted until 3:15 o'clock, 'when Attor-
ney Arthur Brown began the finl ar-
gument for the petitioners.
Sawyer throughout the trial denied
all the charges brought up against
him, and seemed to score a partial vic-
tory yesterday morning when the
court announced that the attorneys
for both sides would confine all ar-
guments to the Long case, the Poland
case, and the Andrew George case.
The trial was begun by charges
brought against Sawyer last fall, all
of which accuse him of misconduct in
the practice of law. It was presided
over by three circuit judges, headed
by Judge Collingwood of Lansing.
The Jewish population of the world
as computed by a London statictican
in. 1019A m. 1K AKA AAA

Student Pick Six Prominent Alumni
for 1922 'Ensian Feature Section

A feature of the 1922 Michiganen-
sian will be the "Prominent Alumni"
section, according to the decision of
the staff at a recent meeting. This
section is to consist of pictures of
Michigan graduates who during the'
past two years have become promin-
ent in their respective positions. It
was agreed that all men from all the
paths of life should be selected and
that the final choice would depend
Organ Recital F
Again Pleases
Large Audience
(By Sidney B. Coates)
What is it about 40 ninutes of organ1
music at twilight tat will bring out
from 700 to 1,000 people again and
again and always send them away sat-
isfied? Does the music give them
pleasant thoughts that cannot be call-{
ed up in any other way, or does the
music simply produce a feeling of rest
and quiet? Whatever be the reason,
the twilight organ series is continuing
to be one of the most important mus-
ical sources on the campus this year.
This was demonstrated again yes-
terday afternoon when nearly ' 1,000
people gathered to hear Harry Russell
Evans play the organ in Hill auditor-
ium. His audience was pleased with
all the numbers given, but those re-
ceiving 'the greatest applause were.
"A Song of India" of Rimsky-Kersa-
how, arranged by Mr. Evans, "Concert
Variations" of Bonnet and "Idylle"
in G of Maskell. The first and last of
these selections won for their melody
and tone effects, while the second
brought the organist deserved praise
because of skillful interpretation.
SCENRIO 0COMPETITION
EXTENDED BY ONE WEEK
INABILITY OF MANY STUDENTS
TO HAND IN PLOTS CAUSES
ACTION
Due to many requests from students
who have been unable to hand in scen-
arios for the University movie within
the time specified, the judges have.
decided to extend the contest for one
week. The final date as now settled
upon is Saturday, Dec. 10, positively
no suggestions or plots for the final.
scenario will be received after that
time.
Students may submit more than one
story, according to a decision of the
judges issued yestrday, and those who
have already handed in plot outlines
will be allowed to turn in additional
suggestions, with the privilege of
working them out into complete sy-
nopses.
The specification that 1,500 words
would be desirable in the scenarios is
still causing difficulty among stu-
dents, and the representative of the'
producers who is now in Ann Arbor
stated yesterday that that number is
merely a convenient one, with no
bearing on the acceptability of the
plots.
If a number larger or smaller than
that will allow a concise and com-
plete synopsis to be written, variations
from the amount specified will not
eliminate any from consideration.
Stanley Goes On
Trip To Europe

Dr. Albert M. Stanley, former bead
of the School of Music, and Miss Dora
Oestreicher were married by Rev. E.
C. Sllhorn at 11 o'clock yesterday
morning at the home of William,
Koch, and have left Ann Arbor for a
two year stay in Europe.
The couple took the 2:45 o'clock
train yesterday afternoon for the
East, where they will visit relatives
until they sail on the Red Star line
Dec. 17. This will be Dr. Stanley's
forty-seventh trip across the Atlan-
tic. Mr. and Mrs. Stanley expect first
to go to Cologne and then to Berlin,
Dresden, Neuenburg, Brussels and
London.
While abroad Dr. Stanley will start
writing a book on the scientific evo-
lution of musical instruments and al-

on the present standing of the alumni
considered.
Six men were to be selected, and, a,
the task of picking from the hundreds
of well known Michigan graduates
was found to be an exceedingly dif-
ficult one, a number of students were
asked by the staff of the 'Ensian to
make the selection.
Edwin Denby, '96, secretary of the
navy, was awarded first place with
708 votes. James Rowland 'Angell,
'90, president of Yale university, was
second with 649 votes. The others
were Dr. William James Mayo, '83M,
surgeon at Rochester, Minn., Harry
M. Daugherty, '81L, attorney general1
of the United States, George L. Sisler,
'15E, first baseman with the St. Louis
American league baseball team, and J.
Avery Hopwood, '05, playright. The
total number of votes cast was 4,523..
ALUMNI PLAN BIG
FOOTBALIL SMOKER
Varsity, Reserves, and Freshmen to
be Entertained in Detroit
Dec. 10
DR. FLAVENS GIVES TALK AT
WEEKLY MEETING YESTERDAY
Members of the Varsity, Reserves,
and All-fresh football squads, coach-
es, and trainers will be the guests of
honor at a smoker given by the De-
troit alumni at 8 o'clock, Dec. 10, at
the Board of Commerce.
Music, cheers, and a talk by Prof.
Robert M. Wenley, of the philosophy
department, will be on the program
offered the football men. Previous to
the smoker, Mr. Kunsky, owner of
several motion pictures houses, will
entertain the athletes at the Madison
theater. Dinner will be served at the
Board of Commerce.
W. Colburn Standish, of Detroit, is
general chairman of the event. At the
weekly luncheon held at the Statler
yesterday he stated that a large turn-
out of students was wanted at the
smoker. Cigars, cigarettes, and a light
lunch will be served.
Dr. John Flavens, of Detroit, who
was the principal speaker at the lunch-
eon chose as his topic, "The Failure of
Prohibition," and discussed it from a
medical standpoint, emphasizing the
fact that apart from the view that it
interferes with individual fredom,
prohibition has also become a serious
menace to public health.
WATER COLORS ON EXHIBIT
IN ENGINEERING BUILDING

JAPNESE DESIRETIE LI C _
IS LAEST REORT
WANT UNDERSTANDING BETWEEN
UNITED STATES, ENGLAND
AND JAPAN
SAY NEED NOT RENEW
ENGLISH ALLIANCE
Representative Kotaro States That
Dual Compact Is No Longer
Needed
(By Associated Press)
Washington, Dec. 1. - Interest was
caused in Japanese circles in connec-
tion with Japan's reported desire to
see come into existence a triple un-
derstanding between Japan, the Unit-
ed States and Great Britain, if the
Anglo Japanese alliance is to be ds-
continued by the issuance tonight of
a statement by Representative Kotaro
Mochizuki, leader of the Japanese op-
position, declaring that in view of the
probable success of the Washington
conference, there was no need of re-
newing the alliance.
Representative Mochizuki declared
the chief object of the Anglo Japan-
ese alliance was to prevent Russian
aggrandisement towards India, China,
Korea and the Pacific. Now that Rus-
sia is no longer a cause of anxiety and
the Washington conference was about
to settle the question of naval bur-
dens and questions pertaining to the
Far East, there seems to him no long-
er need of the alliance.
A ristolochites
Honor 3 Women
For the first time in their history,
the Aristolochites, honorary pharmic
society, at their banquet at 6 o'clock
tonight in the Union are initiating
three women. They are: Monaca Al-
len, '22P, Irene Baisly, '23P, and Hel-
en Anderson, '23P. James F. Hunter,
'23P,. and Harvey A. Whitney, '23P,
will also be initiated.
Prof. C. W. Edmunds, of the phar-
macological dpartment, will be the
chief speaker. Following Professor
Edmunds' address, Prof. Edward H.
Kraus, acting dean *of the college of
pharmacy, and Prof. Charles E. Stock-
ing, secretary of the college of phar-.
macy, will give short talks. James
F. Hunter will respond for the men
and Helen Anderson for the women.
PERRINE VISITS ANN ARBOR
TO SEE DEPARTMENT.HEADS
Dr. J. O. Perrine, of the American
Telephone .and Telegraph company's
department of research, spent two
days this week in the city, visiting
the departments of physics and ele-
trical engineering to confer with the
department heads on general educa-
tion programs with the possibility of
employing graduates from the Uni-
versity in June.
He expressed hearty approval of the
stress laid in these departments upon
fundamentals rather than highly spe-
cialized detail courses. "The com-
any is very well pleased with the
showing of its Michigan men," says
Dr. Perrine.

Sell Seals for Tuberculosis Fight
Christmas seals costing one cent
each, and health bonds worth $10
each went on sale in Ann Arbor yes-
terday in accordance with the custom
of annual campaigning to raise funds
for the fight against tuberculosis. The
yearly sale of such seals and bonds is
entirely under the control of the Na-
tional Tuberculosis association.

Paintings by Gallagher, Park,
Bissegger Are Included
in Display

and{

Water. color paintings by Sears Gal-
lagher, Edith Park, and Teodora Bis-
segger are now on exhibit in the arch-
itectural corridor adjoinng room 205,
Engineering building.,
The subjects of Mr. Bissegger's pic-
tures are Swissand Venetian. His
paintings are held in high esteem in
Boston, whence the present small col-.
lection comes here. Mr. Bissegger's
technique is vigorous, with a bold use
of color.
Sears Gallagher is one of the best
known Eastern water color painters.
His subjects comprise land and water
scapes. Mr. Gallagher is an accom-
plished artist who handles water col-
or with great deftness.
Miss Parks' pictures are bather free
and summary in style, fresh and deli-
cate in color with 4 good rendering of
atmospheric qualities.
IMPROVEMENTS WANTED FOR
HILL AUDITORIUM ACOUSTICS
Due to the poor acoustic qualities of
Hill auditorium when partly filled,
plans are under way to effect improve-
ments and do away with the echo that
is such a source of annoyance to both
lecturer and audience.
Experiments are being made at
present to ascertain just what changes
would be necessary. It Is thought
that by covering the seats of the up-
per gallery with felt a very marked
improvement could be accomplished.
'The Buildings and Grounds depart-
ment will ask for an additional $1,800
in the next budget to cover these

t
t
4
}
y

Irish Crisis Still Pending
London, Dec. 1.-Indications tonig
were that the Irish negotiations appz
ently hanging by a. mere thread :
the last two days, would not be fina
ruptured before Monday, if at z
Robert C. Barton is going to Dub
tonight, and the other Sinn Fein.de
gates expect to follow him tomorrc
There was much complaint in
spring of 1892 because the crowd co

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