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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 29, 1921 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-11-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY .SNVI

"BARGAINS!" "BARGAINS!"

EDUCATORS MEET
1HERE NEXT WEEK'

i
faculty flembers
Back FPresident

Special Bargains
IN SUITS--$32.00
With Extra Pants-$38.50
Polo Shirts
$2.00
College Stripe
Ties
$1.00
Bow Ties
75c

Sheeplined Coats
$15.00-$17.00--$18.50
Suede Moleskin
$18.00
Ulsterette Coats
$20.00
Wool Vest
$4.00
Wool Hose
75c to $1.50

Conference of
Mississippi
For

Representatives Froml
Valley Schools Set
Dec.8, 9, 10

E. J. SCHNEIDER

1119 SOUTH UNIVERSITY AVE.

GOSH! I WISH I KNEW SHORTHAND!
Don't ask your neighbor to explain what the Prof. just said.
You can get it yourself if you know Stenography.
Don't spend frantic hours before the exams. copying lecture
notes and "getting dope" on "what he likes." You will have
all in your book if you know Stenography.
In that debate, you can keep track of all that is presented and
note down your refutation and retorts as well if you know
Stenography.
A SAMPLE LESSON FREE is for a limited time offered
to students of the UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN to
show you that you can learn stenography by mail.
Back of this offer, stands the AROND SCHOOL OF STEN-
OGRAPHY - one of the most successful in the East.
s Without undertaking any obligation of any kind, you judge
for yourself what you can do..

I

We want you to see that you can learn by our method and how we
teach. For a short period, the fee for THE COMPLETE COURSE, in-
cluding 'the standard text-book used in the New York City High
Schools, willbe r15.
Don't dilly-dally. Write at once for your free Sample Lesson to

PROMINENCE ON PROGRAM
GIVEN VOCATIONAL PROBLEMS
In response to a request from rep-
resentatives of the institutions con-4
cerned, the United States commission-
er of education has called a "confer-
ence of men from institutions in thet
Mississippi valley states engaged in1
training teachers of the manual arts
and industrial education," of white
schools, to be held in Ann Arbor on
Thursday, Friday and Saturday, Dec.
8, 9 and 10. Prof. George E. Myers
of the education department will direct
the conference. The chairman of the
program is William T. Bawden, as-
sistant to the commissioner of the
United States Bureau of Education.
Each institution in this territory has
been requested to send a representa--'
tive to the conference, and the depart-
ment of public instruction in each
state of the territory is also invited
to send members. It is expected that
more than twelve states will take part
in the meetings.
President Marion L. Burton, Dean.
Allen S. Whitney and Prof. George
Myers are listed among the speakers
at the conference. C. F. Kleinfelter of
the Federal Board of Vocational Edu-
cation at Washington, will also speak,
as well as prominent educators
throughout the vicinity.
Various phases of the problem of
vocational education will be taken up,
as well as problems of teaching by
correspondence. E. T. Filbey, acting
director of the vocational bureau of
the Detroit public schools will open
the conference on the morning of De-
cember 8 with a discussion of the
influence of the vocational motive in
the choice of curricula by high school
students.
SUTO KELP UM SHORTAGE
LUNCH PROBLEM RECOGNIZED AS
SERIOUS OBSTACLE TO
INNOVATION
Present congestion in class rooms
may necessitate the using of the hour
from 12 to 1 o'clock as a class period,
acocrding to the opinions of many of
the faculty.
Registrar Arthur G. Hall states that
the practical problem facing the Uni-
versity in the establishment of this in-
novation is whether the restaurants,
eating houses and fraternities would
be willing to extend their lunch hour
so as to take care of those having
twelve o'clocks.
The manifest problem to such an ar-
rangement is whether student help
could be secured at these different
hours.
Those managers of eating houses
who have been interviewed object to
twelve o'clock classes on the ground
that it would necessitate an addition-
al force of waiters and make the work
heavier for the regular help.
Registrar Hall stated that so far as
the instructors are concerned they
would, on the whole, welcome such an
arrangement because it would mean
that their classes would be over by
one o'clock.

"Reassure the President" is the
slogan under which various copies of
a letter bearing on the limitation of
armaments confersnee are being sign-
ed by university Faculties and trans-
mitted to President Id<rdng. The pur-
pose of the letters is to assure the
President that the nation is solidly
behind the movem nt to prevent future
world wars, so that when the confer-
ence reaches the (.iscussion of specific
m'easures the American delegates may
know to what ex ent they can countl
on the support of the American people.
A copy of this letter, received at
the President's o'fice, has been for-
warded Ic Washin' ton with more than
30 signatures of prominent facult.'
men. STIVI~
MISS STRT- : .~i 1,rOT R
TEN DAY CONCERT TOUR
Marian Struble, of the violin cle-
partment of the School of Music, will
appear in several concerts in cities
outside of Ann Arbor during the next
ten days. On Nov. 30 she will be heard'
in recital in Loudonville, O., and on
Dec. 1 she will give a joint recital
with Catherine Coburn, soprano, and
Mary Louise Maxwell, pi nis t, both of
the School of Music, in Durnad.
She will also be heard with James
Hamilton, tenor, of Chicago, Dec. 2 at
Tattle Creek, and the next Friday,
Dec. 9, will be soloist with the Toledo
Symphony orchestra in Toledo.
Twenty years ago the football teams
were accustomed to practice on the
campus.

,A-

our cases.

This assortment may

include all the world's selection.

.gut don 't be too slolp

4

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r1777

:
T'

~'The' Quarry"
G. CLAUDE DRkAKE
Proprietor

KODAK FINISH ING
Flashlg hts and
Outside Groups
EASTMAN KODAKS AND FILMS
719 N. UNIVERSITY

The choice of the world's best in
Perfumes can be found shown, in

rp

s

Department M
AROND SCHOOL OF STENOGRAPHY,
1193 BROADWAY, NEW YORK CITY

w

V W AM,

Your Picture
Problems'
Solved by a
"America'- ,'a:ter Camera
THE Rexo is a camera
with all the fine points de-
manded by the expert, and in-
corporating the features which
make it easy for the, amateur
to get good pictures. In this
instrument is combined the
experiences of all time camera
building. It is a master prod-+
uct-just as beautiful at it is
efficient. One of its many fea-
tures is the precise and rigid ad-
justment between lens andfilm
-your guarantee of clear,
sharp pictures.
RESIDENT STUDENT
REPRESENTATIVE

E;
Y

We're Assembled

for Inspection

4

ATTENTION!

Get 'em from
o&IH
Men's
Shoe Shop

TOMORROW AND THURSDAY
They both loved the great Maestro. One
loved him for his fame, for the romantic
glamor that surrounded the greatest master
of the piano. One flattered him. The other
nursed him. Which won?
AN ALL STAR PRODUCTION
HE CONCER
THREE YEARS IN 1EW YORK
AND STILL TALKED ABOUT

Black or
Brown
Norwegian
Grain
$8.50

r q
ti -'
Cut down your 'overhead.
Wear o. & H. Shoes

Soft or
Hard Toe.
Built on
new lines
$8.50

r-

T

T

An unusual
story with
Mystery,
Drama,
and
Mirth

Men, Women,
Girls, Boys,
Have you
ever asked
yourself:
"What do I
really
believe ?"

L. J. WOLTZEN
244 Murray Ave.
Sold in Ann Arbor
Ly
1111 S. University Ave.
crto- ?.oto1?roductsaremadebij
~Cicago - Ku m orlA

We have kept down our "overhead" and it will
be advantageous for you to see us before buying
footwear. It costs you no more to buy foot-
wear in Ann Arbor than elsewhere, if you "look
around" before you buy.

4

O'KANE -& HERTLER

Dowun Town

3

OUR BEST ADS ARE WORN, NOT READ

.,

f

M --

3 RAMINGĀ°

Eat

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--AT--

AN EVEN EXCHANGE MAY BE NO ROBBERY, AS THE OLD
PROVERB STATES, BUT WHEN IT COMES TO WIES-!
LAST TIMES TODAY
CLARA KIMBALL YOUNG
C.IN-
Charge It

Starbucks
605 E. LIBERTY

II

A~~~ l~twi nri

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You will have to
admit that it is

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.

I. urtrait
ti U1I tiIUUIttQ

worth a trial.
We stay open
all night

ffIlobalt

AESOP'S

ADDED

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