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November 29, 1921 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-11-29

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THES WEATHER I Z w~ASSOCIATED
PROBABLY CLOUDY LTPRS
TODAYDAY AND NIHT WIIl
VOL. XXXII. No. 65 ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY,'NOVElVdBER 29, 1921 PRICE FIVE C

JAA MAE
FIRM DEMA NDS
AT CONFERENCE
VICE-ADMIRAL KATO INSISTS ON
70 PER CENT NAVAL
RATIO
AMERICANS REMAIN
BEHIND HUGHES PLAN
Reconciliation of Groups Presents
First Great Problem of
Sessions
(By Associated Press)
Washington, Nov, 28.-The Wash-
ington arms conference is approach-
ing its first great decision. It was an-
nounced tonight by Vice-Admiral Kato,
chief Japanese naval expert, that Japan
would seek a 70 per cent naval ratio.
At the same time it was announced,
with equal authority that the Ameri-
can delegation stood firmly on Secre-
tary Hughes' "five-ive-three" ratio
proposal which means a 60 per cent
status for Japan. The conference ul-1
timately must reconcile these two
views.
Tomorrow the naval experts of the
five powers will hold their first meet-
ing in nearly a week. They have con-
cluded their intergroup discussion of
the American plan, so far as its major
factors are concerned. Developments
today and tonight indicated that they
would return the matter to the confer-
ence delegates without recommend-
ations for important modifications.
The American experts are' satisfied
that the original extimate of naval
strength on which the Hughes plan
was based is correct. The committee
report made is not clear. Presumably
the British officers are in accord with
the American view in many respects.
The attitude of French and Italian ex-
ports has not been formally diclosed.

More Than 140, 000Witness Michigan
Football Games During Past Season

Reports of the attendance at the
football games in which Michigan
competed this season show that the
Maize and Blue team played before a
total of 143,500 people. The receipts
of the games played on Ferry field
amount to $170,000, an estimate ob-
tained from the Board in Control of
Athletics.
Athletic Association Figures
The figures of attendance at Ferry
field are as nearly correct as is pos-
sible to obtain, being taken from the
records of the Athletic association.
Those from the games played on op-
REMINGTON SPEAKS
AT UNION SERVICES

ponents' fields are estimated, care be-
ing taken to keep the estimate conser-
vative.
The season's games and attendance

are listed below:
Mount Union............
Case....................
M. A. C................
Ohio State..............
Illinois (estimated) .......
Wisconsin (estimated) ....
Minneo t.--

10,000
8,000
18,000
40,500
14,000
20,000
R M AAA

Visiting Bishop Warns Against
terialistic Purpose in
Life

Ma.

MLL Ua .............. u, v
Total................143,500
This figure is larger than that of
any shcool in the middle West, with
the exception of Ohio State.
The receipts for the games played at
Ferry field, including a proportion of
students' fees will approximate $170,-
000, according to Ralph W. Aigler,
chairman of the Board in Control of
Athletics. Professor Aigler laid stress
on the fact that this figure is, at the
presen time, but an estimate. Com-
plete figures will be available at a
later date.
Receipts Largest Ever
The receipts are the largest ever in
the history of Michigan, and are
thought to be in excess of any school
in the middle West for this season,
except Ohio State. It was pointed out
that at theOhio State game, Oct. 22, the
receipts amounted to more than many
of the Conference schools will record
for the entire football year.
OPERA SET 'TSLE AT
UNION THIS AFTERNOON

News of the Day
IN BRIEF
Washington, Nov. 28. -. Senator
Watson, Republican, Indiana, disotss-'
ed with President :arding tonight
matters that may be included in the
formal message to congress next week
upon which the President is now3
working. As his personal opinion
Senator Watson expressed the belief,
upon leaving that "nothing in the
world" could prevent enactment, dur-
ing a regular session, of the bonus
bill for former service men,
Cleveland, Nov. 28.-A movement is
under way to form a labor organiza-
tion in America similar to the Brit-
ish labor party, it was indicated to-
day, when the national executive
committee of the Socialist party meet-
ing here voted to participate in a
conference, to be held at a later date
for this purpose.
New York, Nov. 28. - The federal
grand jury-late today returned an in-
dictment charging 51 individuals and.
53 corporations in the window glass
industry with violation of the Sher-
man anti-trust law. Joseph N. Nee-
nan, president of the national glass
workers union, also was indicted on
similar charges,
New Orleans, Nov. 28.-Two hundred
and fifty policemen battled for an
hour today with union sympathizers
of striking river scum workers. The
battle extended over a space of five
blocks. Numerous arrests were made
and a number of injured were sent to
hospitals.

GIVES INFORMAL TALK AT
UNION SUNDAY AFTERNOON1
Rt. Rev. William P. Remington, D.D.,E
suffragan bishop of South Dakota,'
gave the address at the University,
service held in Hill auditorium Sun-
day night.
Delivers Powerful Address j
Bishop Remington's theme was
"Winning the World and Losing Your
Soul". His forceful manner of speak-
ing- and his interesting subject made
a deep impression on the large audi-
ence which filled the auditorium. He
made a direct appeal to everyone who
ever taught young people to be more
than careful not to give theo impres-
sion that their charges should go out
into the world holding the idea that
the purpose in life was to gain a
worldly or material satisfaction. {
In his informal talk at 2:30 o'clock
Sunday afternoon in the Union read-
ing room, Bishop Remington made a
plea for a new feeling toward work
among the men who must choose a
profession for life. "The realization
must come' that there is something
much greater in life than earning a'
living, for it is' education's first aim'
to teach men and women how to live.
Mere drifting in search of adventure]
for its own sake is not the way to
fulfill the function in life for which
the Creator has destined each one
of us."
First Talk of Series'
The address was the first of a se-
ries of informal talks that the Union
plans for Sunday afternoons during
the rest of the year. The Union or-
chestra gave selections before the
opening of the program.
YALE PR1OFESSOR
OPENS ASSEMBLY
Prof. Charles F. Kent, of Yale uni-
versity, was the principal speaker
yesterday at the opening session of the
Religious Education assembly at Lane
hall. The assembly opened at 3
o'clock with the registration and as-
signments for the two following days.
Professor Kent, has been released
from Yale university that he may hold
a series of conferences in universities,
colleges and cities of the middle West.
His address at the afternoon session
was on "The Democracy of the Pro-
phets and Jesus." At the evening ses-
sion he spoke on "The Readjustment
of the Church to Modern Needs."
The assembly opens at 9 o'clock to-
day and Professor Kent will address
both morning and afternoon sessions.
Senior Engineer Smoker Postponed
On account of entertainments and
numerous other attractions for that
evening, the senior engineers' smoker
which was to have been held tomor-
row night has been postponed one
week to Wednesday, Dec. 7.

HINSOAE OPPOSES
MEDICALMERGERH
Wants Homoeopathic Medical School'
and Hospital Left Intact or
Annihilated
130 PHYSICIANS DISCUSS MAT-
TER AT DETROIT MEETING
"My personal view in regard to the
proposed merging of the two Medical
schools," said Dean Hinsdale, of the
Homoeopathic Medical school, in an
interview yesterday,,"is that if it is
deemed that the Homoeopathic school
and hospital are not worthy of per-
petuation in their integrity, I would
certainly rather see them entirely an-
nihilated - wiped out altogether."
Alumni Present
More than 130 homoeopathic physi-
cians, 100 of whom were doctors of
the state of Michigan and 30 of whom
were alumni of the University, assem-
bled in Detroit Sunday afternoon to
discuss the question of the proposed
merging.
Facts were presente showing that
there are at present nore than 600
homoeopathic physicians practicing in
this state, a large percentage of whom
are graduates of the school here.
Granting that each represents at least
a thousand clients, there would be a
minimum of 600,000 persons in the
state of Michigan preferring and em-
ploying homoeopathic treatment.
Figures presented also showed that
there is an average daily attendance
of 136 patients, or between 8,000 and
7,000 a year, at the Hooeopathic
hospital. It was felt by those attend-
ing the meeting that such a hospital
should be perpetuated in the interest
of public policy, and not sacrificed to
give place to the Health serice, as
has been suggested.
Regents Will Settle Matter
President Marion L. Burton has
written to leading alumni of the Hom-
oeopathic school inviting them to meet
with the Regents at 11 o'clock on the
morning of Dec. 9, at which time the
proposed plan of merging the two
schools will be finally discussed and
probably decided. This will give them
a full opportunity to state their case,
formal Dlance At
Union Friday
Announcement has been made that
the regular membership dance Friday
night at the Union will be formal. The
ticket sale is open to general member-
ship and all those attending the dance
will be expected to appear in forhal
dress. No change will be made in the
admission fee or in the general pro-
gram of the evening aside from the
formality in dress. This is the first
formal week end dance given by th
Union and should it prove successfu
it is planned to have one formal dress
dance a month.

Twenty Initiated
Into Tau Beta Pi
Tau Beta Pi, national honorary en-
gineering society, initiated yesterday
the 20 men who were elected to mem-
bership two weeks ago. Following the
ceremonies the organization held a
banquet at the Chamber of Commerce
Inn. Prof. Benjamin F. Bailey, of the
electrical engineering department, ad-
dressed the members upon "Science in
Engineering". E. F. Moore, '22E, wel-
comed the new members, and W. C.
Dean, '22E, replied for the initiates.
A. D. Moore, grad, acted as toastmas-
ter.
PRESIS CLUB TO
HEAR ROSBOCK

MUSCALCLUBS
OFFER VARIETY II
CONCERT TUNISI
POPULAR AND CLASSICAL S4
IN WELL BALANCED
PROGRAM
VAUDEVILLE ELEMENl
ELIMINATED THIS TI
Traditional Opening Number "La
Atque Carmina" Will Be
Sung

WOMEN CAN BUY TICKETS
"MAKE IT FOR TWO"
TOMORROW

Business Y4 .r of Newspaper
terprhe Association
Will Talk

FORI

Union members will have their last
chance today to exercise their prece-
dence for seats for the Union opera,
"Make It for Two", which opens next
Monday, Dec. 5, at the Whitney thea-
ter. A box office sale will be held
from 2 to 5 o'clock in the lobby of the
Union.
Tickets will go on sale for the wom-
en of the University from 2 to 5
o'clock tomorrow in Hill auditorium,
and Thursday they' wil go on public
sale at the Whitney theater.
There has been a large demand for
seats and it is expected that before
the end of the week the entire house
will be sold out for all performances
of the week here.
Frrst Issue Of
Lake Review Out,
After considerable delay in print-
ing, the November Michigan Law Re-
view has made its appearance, featur-
ing three technical articles in addi-
tion to the regular departments of
Note and Comment, Recent Decisions,
and Book Reviews.
The first of the feature articles is
on "The Supreme Court's Construction
of the Federal Constitution, in 1920-
1921" by Thomas Reed Powell, of Col-
umbia university. The article is a dis-
cussion of the supreme court decisions
for the October term of 1921, and is
continued in the December issue of the
Review.
An interesting discussion of "Judges
in the British Cabinet and the Struggle
Which Led to Their Exclusion after
1806" is the second article, written by
Prof. Arthur L. Cross of the history
department. Dealing with the limit of
the congressional control over com-
merce and the state's powers to tax,
the last article by J. M. Landis, of
Princeton university, presents a dis-
cussion of "The Commerce Clauses as
a Restriction on State Taxation,"
Have you sent in your scenario for
the University movie yet?

ARTHUR BRISBANE MAY BE
SPEAKER AT NEXT MEETING
Frank W. Rpsbock, business mana-
ger of the Newspaper Enterprise as-
sociation, will speak atthe regular
bi-weekly luncheon of the Students'
Press club, to be held at 6:15 o'clock
tonight at the Union. He was for-
merly managing editor of the Cincin-
nati Post, and has had a number of
years experience in the newspaper
game. His talk will(be of practical
interest to all who are considering
journalistic work. He is coming to the
city as a guest of H. H. Johnson, man-
aging editor the Ann Arbor Times-
News.
Arthur Brisbane, the leading edi-
torial writer of Hearst's papers, was
to have spoken at the same meeting,
but he will be detained in Washing-
ton by the disarmament conference
until late in the week. He has, how-
ever, accepted a tentative engagement
Jo speak at a luncheon on Dec. 13.
Students Write
Press Bulleftin
Compilation has been made of the
first University Press bulletin of the
year by the students of the department
of rhetoric and journalism, and the
bulletin is being sent out to all of
the papers in the surrounding couii-
try.
The bulletin, which is an institution
largely to give the students of journal-
ism at the University practical train-
ing in reporting, contains news of
timely interest of the school. The
students gather this news from various
sources, and it is compiled by the
journalistic faculty and printed in a
letter form which is mailed.
Have you sent in your scenario for
the University movie yeti

En-1

Musical throughout, with no at-
tempt to bring in the vaudeville ele-
ment which has characterized many
fornier performances, the fall concert
of the Varsity Glee and Mandolin club
will be given at 8 o'clock this eve-
ning at Hill auditorium.
A few last minute changes in the
program have been announced, but
these minor alterations will not affect
the standard of the concerat as a
whole, according to those who are in
charge of the arrangements.
Quartette Replaced
The popular quartette, which was to
have sung a number of present-day
hits in harmony, has been replaced
by Robert W. Dieterle, '23M, whole
work in musical entertainments has
been received with great favor. Die-
terle has not yet announced what he
will sing at the concert tonight.
The fact that the quartette will not
appear does not mean that popular
music will be excluded from the pro-
gram. It has been the purpose of
those who have arranged the pro-
gram to have the entertainment in-
clude music both poular and classi-
cal, and this purpose wl not be for-
gotten. A variety that will appeal to
every possible taste is still promis-
ed by officers of the club.
Tradition has again decreed that the
concert'open with "Laudes Atque Car-
mina" and close with "The Victors".
These, with the Varsity quartette's
number, "A Toast to Michigan", con-
stitute the Michigan songs that will be
sung at the concert.
Offer Instrumental Selectons
Classical numbers, which will be
both vocal and instrumental, will be
given. The Glee club, singing "Oh
Hail Us, Ye Free", from "Ernani", and
the string sextette playing a selection
from the works of Krug, will give the
lovers of good music a type of music
that willsuit their tastes. Lighter se-
lections, such as "Ole Uncle Moon",
will fill in the gap between the former
class of music and the medlies of the
banjo quartette.
ALUMNAE APPOINT
NEW COMMITTEES

R
s
t
r
r
e
.
E
3
r

Players Club Presents Sheridanh's
"eSchool For Scandal" Tonight

"The School for Scandal", one of the
few classical comedies still enjoyable
for its purely humorous qualities, will
be presented by the Players club to-
night and tomorrow night at Sarah
Caswell Angell hall at 8 o'clock.
Story of Older Day
The comedy takes up the "shock-
ingly modern" tendencies of the dear
old younger generation way back
when our great grandmothers wore
pinafores, when duels between jealous
lovers were waged by swords instead
of by a contest of taxicabs and din-
ner parties.
The play itself was written when its
author, Richard Brinsley Sheridan,
was but 25 years old. It was present-

ed for the first time in Drury Lane
theater, London, in May, 1776, and its
popularity has continued steadily for
150 years. It has the distinction of
being known as George Washington's
favorite comedy.
Success Predicted
Leading characters of the play are
taken by Catherine Greenough, '23,
Joyce McCurdy, '22, Harold P. Lip-
sitz, '22, and Jack Holden, '22. Ac-
cording to Prof. R. D. T. Hollister,
who has personally directed the play,
the production will be more than sat-
isfactory.
Players club's new orchestra, just
organized thiss fall, will give its initial
public performance tonight, enter-
tainng between acts.

Special committees which have been
appointed to investigate the different
phases of the women's- building will
confer this afternoon with Mrs. Ed-
ward D. Pomeroy, '96, chairman of the
executive committee of the Alumnae
council.
Chairmen of the-committees are
as follows: Chairman of the commit-
tee to investigate conditions in similar
buildings in other educational institu-
tions, Helen Bates, '18; chairman of
the committee on organization which
shall function in the building, Mrs.
Walter Pillsbury, '05; chairman of the
comm'tttee to organize new groups of
Michigan alumnae throughout the
country, Mrs. Evans Holbrook, '03;
chairman of the committee on mem-
bership, Mrs. Max Winkler, '93.
Kentucky Club Will Eleet Officers
Meeting for the first time this year,
the Kentucky club will hold its an-
nual election of officers tonight on the
third floor of the Union. Order will
be called at 7:30 o'clock.

An
ll-J~Iusical
Treat

Varsity Glee and Mandolin Club
63rd ANNUAL FALL CONCERT

A

Program-To

TONIGHT

8P.M.

HILL AUDITORIUM

Please

/

Admission Fifty Cents

F-

r

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