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November 27, 1921 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-11-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

MEMBER 27, 1921

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

,,'I

" y ter,:
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SATURDAY TO MAP OUT NEW BIG TEN SCHEDULE

i

(By Associated Press)
Chicago, Nov. 26.-Comes now the
business of drafting football schedules
for the 1922 season.
Coaches of the Western Conference
will meet here next Saturday to map
out the gridiron programs for next
year and because of the spectacular
windup of the 1921 race, gridiron fol-
lowers are indulging in a lot of spec-
ulation regarding the schedules of
Ohio State and Iowa, who fought out
this year's championship.
Princeton to Come West
The eastern invasion of Chicago,
which resulted in a 9 to 0 triumph over
Princeton, has started a movement
for East vs. West games next sea-
son. Chicago already has arranged to
play Princeton in a return game here
early in October and Iowa, 1921 Con-
ference champions, according to ad-
vance indications, probably will ar-
range a, game with Yale to be played
inrthe East. Illinois is negotiating
for a game with a. representative
Southern eleven to be played in Mai-
phis, while Michigan is considering a
game with Vanderbilt for the second
week in October.
Iowa May Meet Ohio
What the Iowa schedule will be next
fall there is no way of determining.
Howard Jones, coach of the trium-
phant Hawkeyes, and Jack Wilce,
coach of the Ohio eleven, may decide
to arrange a game for next year in
view of the fact that these teams did
not meet this year.
Followers of the championship
Hawkeyes are planning a wonderful
schedule for Iowa, but Coach Jones is
laughing up his sleev at the pro-
posals.
"Itaseems to be the general attitude
that Iowa must at once assume a po-
sition of dictator in the Big Ten,"
Coach Jones said. "Perhaps everyone
does not carry it quite that far, but
Enroll now-"School For Scandal."
-Adv.

Ion every hand there seems to be a
great misunderstanding of conditions
in the Big Ten and of the methods
employed in working out schedules. It
would be most unfortunate if some of
the old Conference rivalries would be
interfered with. Such rivalries as
those between Ohio and Illinois, Min-
nesota and Wisconsin, and Indiana
and Purdue cannot be broken just be-
cause Iowa had a successful team.
Just now Iowa takes particular interest
in the games with Minnesota and Illi-
nois and we are anxious to continue
playing these teams.
"We probably will have a game with
Yale next year, largely because Chi-
cago substituted Princeton for Iowa on
its schedule for 1921. However, there
is no quarrel betweenrChicago and
Iowa. Iowa would prefer to play
teams in the Big Ten rather than go
east, but it is not always possible to
agree all around."
Buckeyes Plan Big Schedule
Although Ohio State's schedule is
still very much in an embryo state,
it is almost certain to include Ober-
lin, Ohio Wesleyan, Minnesota, -Il-

lin

ois, Michigan and

Chicago. OhioI

Wesleyan and Oberlin are the two
oldest foes in Ohio State's foot-
ball history and it is doubtful if they
will disappear from the Buckeye
schedule. Coach Wilce is anxious to
play Oberlin next fall because of the
upset given the Buckeyes at the start
of last season.
PROMISING MATERIAL
FOR VARSITY ELEVEN
ON FRESHMAN TEAM
PLAYERS ON MATHER'S FRESH
SQUAD WILL HELP YOST
BUILD TEAM
Several good men appeared this year
on the freshman football squad. On
the line, -Vreeland proved to be the
best bet. The big boy was aggressive
at all times, and a hard man to get
around. Another good lineman was
Tracy, who will bear watching next
year. Davis, at end, showed to ad-
vantage, whileaKeefer,sDawson, and
Monahan all proved to be backfield
men upon whom Yost may count next
year.
The biggest surprise was Murray.
Though of diminutive size and weigh-
ing only about 150 pounds, Murray was
a guard of sterling quality. It is to
be hoped that he is able to develop
some weight this year, for with his
fighting spirit, he should be able to
furnish a good fight for this position.-
Steger, of Oak Park, was not allowed
to participate in any scrimmages this
year. Last year, while playing in

high school competition, he tore a
muscle in his leg, and it was thought
best to let him rest for a year.
Slaughter, 160-pound All-state center
from Missouri, was unable to get out
for the freshman squad, on account
of a class late in the afternoon. With
Michigan losing Ernie Vick this year,
Slaughter should bear watching for
the pivot position next year.
For the ways of society see "School
for Scandal."-Adv.
Tickets for Glee Club Concert at
Graham's and Wahr's.-Adv.
"School for Scandal" is coming.-
Adv.

467 LISTED IN R 0H T, C.
Underclassmen, Engineers Predomin-
ate in Enrollment
Final tabulation of the fall enroll-
ment in the R. 0. T. C. shows a total
enrollment of 467. Of this number
sophomores and freshmen predomin-
ate, the sophomores leading in class
enrollment with 168. Most of the stu-
dents in this department come from
the Engineering school. There is a
tendency of late, however, that shows
an increasing number coming in from
the literary college,tand it is expect-
ed that eventually there will be an

equal number of men enrolled from
both departments.

REFEREES WANTED
The Intramural department
wants men to act as referees for
basketball matches. Those wish-
ing to act in this capacity are re-
quested to write the Intramural
department, room 3, Press build-
ing. Men proving satisfactory
will be paid at an hourly rate.

G

"School For
Within.-Adv.

Scandal" shows Society

I !

It

is the adaptation of one's self to his re-
sources that makes for success. A good
way to effect that adaptation is to
carry an account

WHAT WOULD YOU LIKE TO
READ IN THE DAILYI
What would you like to read
in The Daily? In what manner
can the faculties and facilities
of the University be made of
interest, value, and pratcical
aid-to students, faculty, and
others?
The Daily is much limited as
to the quantity of news which it
is able to print-it can exercise
choice in the general character
of that news. Mail your sugges-
tions to the City Editor, Michi-
gan Daily.
1 D
"School For Scandal" shows Society
Within.-Adv.

I
I

- at"-""

The Ann Arbor Savings
Resources over $5,ooo,000.00

Bank

rq

These Are

the Days.

I

When
Who

the

Man

Forgot

Is Forgotten

By J R. HAMILTON
Pormer Advertising Manager of Wanamaker's, Philadelphia
Even the man who forgot to set the semaphore and killed
a hundred people is seldom remembered by name. He simply
passes out of the lives and the activities of men.
It behooves us all to remember. And memory? Memory
is the shortest-lived of all the faculties.
In some scientific tests made a few years ago It was found
that memory reaches its clearest vision about twenty minutes
after any occurrence. From then on the picture dims. And
what we hold so vividly in our minds years after an occurrence
Is not the memory but the imagination of it.
Now hundreds of people are trying to impresssome big idea
upon our fleeting memories every day. They are trying to tell
us about their store, or their merchandise, or their advantages
of some kind or other. They are trying to impress upon us the
advantages of their time-savers or their money-savers. They are
trying to tell us of some luxury we ought to have. They are trying
to give us a mental picture of some necessity.
They are spending a great deal of money in doing this. And
It seems only fair when they ge to all this effort for our benefit
that we should at least give thn some small part of our active
attention.
The reason these people advertise again and again and again
is because we will not compel our eyes to see what they have to
say nor our minds to remember it. And so they are obliged to
compel our memories for us. And so they do it in spite of us,
because they have also learned that constant repetition is the
greatest method of training the memory and instilling an impor-
tant fact into our minds.
But the point is that advertising is far more Important even
for us who buy than for those who sell. For advertising has come
to signify an act and an emblem of good faith throughout all the
channels of trade.
And so those of us who have not learned to read the adver-1
tising and to remember its message are constantly being tricked
in price and fooled in quality.
We are the ones who lose out in the fight. We are the man
at the semaphore. We who forget are forgotten.
(Copyrighted.)

I
i

ii

AKE

IT

FOR TWO"
16th Michigan Union Opera

Announcing the Box Office Ticket Sale

Whitney

Theatre

Week of

Dec.

5

Union Members, who failed to get mail orders in by Nov. 25

Tuesday, Nov. 29, Union Lobby,

2-5 P.M.

University Women---Wed. Nov. 30, Hill Auditorium, 2-5 p. m.

General Public---Thursday, Dec. 1,

Whitney Theatre

New Costumes New Scenery New Muslo

An opera that Is a real musical comedy.

Absolutely surpasses other operas by far

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