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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 26, 1921 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-11-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

DAILY SPORTING STI
YTHICAL AL
PLATERS HAVE BEEN CHOSENb
FOR INDIVIDUAL PERFORM- o
ANCES THIS YEAR 4
BOTH SQUADS ARE WELLn
BALANCED AND STRONG e
Five Michigan, Five Wisconsin, FiveC
Chicago, Four Iowa, ThreeM
Ohio State Men Namede
In the selection of an All-Confer-
ence football team The Michigan Dailye
Sport staff has picked men whose in-
dividual performances this seasone
have stood out as particularly bril-
liant in the Big Ten contests. Menp
have been selected not for previous
reputatiop r fame in past years but
for the fodtball ability they have dis- i
played this year. In picking the play-b
ers for these two mythical elevenst
which represent the power of thed
Western Conference, many circum-f
stances have been taken into consid-e
eration. In many instances certaine
players in the Big Ten have display-t
ed unusual ability against a lesser op-c
ponent but the copparative merits ofa
the players as demonstrated under f
the strain of important battles hasd
prompted the above selections ratherI
than the total number of points scor-
ed of play in any particular game. 1
Teams About EvenC
Both teams are well balanced. Theyf
have -1ines well nigh impregnable,
while the backfields of each eleven
constitute ground gainingquartettes
that are without peers in any section
of the country. In several instances
men have been chaned, from their
original positions to others that could
be easily played by them. Such is the
case of Bunge of ,Wisconsin. Bunge
is one of the greatest pivot men in
the country but his play has failed toj
equal that of Ernie Vick, who has justt
finished his fourth year of Conference'
football. Vick's play against Bunge
at Wisconsin gave the edge to the
Wolverine center, who has enjoyede
even a greater year than that of 1918
when, he was the unanimous choice of1
critics for the pivot position.1
Backfield PowerfulC
The selection of Devine and Locke'
needs little comment. They formed thet
scoring and ground gaining combina-r
tion which failed to meet an equal.e
Cappon of Michigan is probably the
most versatile player in the Confer-t
ence. Cappon has made good at tac-
kle, end, and halfback. In the latter
position he has failed to meet ant
equal against Wisconsin, Illinois, or
Minnesota in line plunging. Cappon1
is essentially a line plunger and re-
gardless of his interference he us-1
ually manages to make four or five
yards while on numerous occasions1
he has torn through both the opposing1
line and secondary defense for sweep-
ing gains. Williams has been picked1
because of his wonderful open field1
work.
On the first team then Aubrey De-
vine would do the kicking, passing
and open field running. = Cappon andt
Locke would bear the brunt of the,
attack through the line. Williams
could be called upon to drive throught
the line or carry the ball around ends.
Line Impregnable;
yhe line from end to end is etmposed
of the best men in the Conference. Te-,

bell is a great flanker and with Goebel
would receive the passes from Devine.
Goebel is probably the best defensive
end in the Big Ten. Goebel can alto-
THIS
COLUMN
CLOSES
AT 3 P.M. AIVER

1FF VOLUNTEERS
;ONFERENCEGRID
FOR 921SEASO0N
be called back for trick plays to kick
or pass. Slater and McGuire are with-
out peers among the tackles. Bunge,
of Wisconsin, can easily play guard
and is one of the hardest playing line-
men in the Conference. Vick, how-
ever, is a stronger defensive man and
passes more accurately. Trott, of
Ohio State, is a lineman whose play
was always in evidence in the Buck-
eye games. He has shown to greater
advantage than his teammate Pixley.
Vick at center has been long consid-
ered as one of the greatest pivot men
in America. This year Vick opposed
every center of note in the Conference
except King of Chicago. Vick's ex-
perience gives him first call.
Second Team All Stars
There is little difference in the abil-
ity of the men on the two teams. Both
have powerful, aggressive lines and
the backfields are well fortified in all
departments. Devine, of Iowa, is a
faster man than anyone on the second
eleven but Romney and Kipke togeth-
er should form a ground gaining pair
that would match the smashing tactics
of Thomas and Sundt. Both Thomas
and Sundt have done well on ope
fields. Eitler Kipke or Sundt could
do the kicking while Romney and
Kipke could drop kick or place kick.
The two teams are made up of five
Michigan men, five Wisconsin men, five
Chicago men, four Iowa, and three
from Ohio State.
FRATERNITY BOWLING TO
BEGIN MONDA9Y.EVENING
Qualifying ro~inds in the interfrater-
nity bowling tournament will open

All- Conference Football Team

First Team
Tebell (Wisconsin) ...............L.
Slater (Iowa)............... ...L.
Bunge (Wisconsin)......_... ..L.
Vick (Michigan) ....................
Trott (Ohio State) ................R.
McGuire (Chicago)..............R.
Goebel ,(Michigan) .................R.
Devine, A. (Iowa) Capt. .............t
Williams (Wisconsin) ...........L.
Cappon (Michigan).............R.
Locke (Iowa) .......................

Second Team
E............ Belding (Iowa)
T............Brader (Wisconsin)
G.......... Dunne (Michigan) Capt.

LE
Al
theF
be c
weet

C............King (Chicago) -
.G........ .... Pixley (Ohio State) Enro
T............Huffman (Ohio State -Adv.
E.............Chicler (Chicago)
Q............Momney (Chicago)
H............Thomas (Chicago) H
H.....:......Kipke (Michigan)
F............Sundt (Wisconsin) C
CH
the line of the Southerners and had to1
resort to an aerial game in order to
win by a 21-0 score.
Coach Andy Smith, of the University
of California, has offered three dates

In 1891 the Ann Arbor high sch(
AVE ANYTHING BEHIND? used to play the Varsity football tea
1 personal property left in "School For Scandal" is coming
Ferry field club house should Adv.
alled for and claimed this
k.ecia discount on persona Chi
k' mas Card orders received before Nc
20. O. D. Morrill, 17 Nickel's Arcai
Open evenings.-Adv.
11 now-"School For Scandal." Enroll now "School for Scandal."
Adv.
AVE YOU TRIED A SPECIAL SUNDAY DINNER
TABLE DE HOTE AT THE
HAMBER OF COMMERCE INN?
ICKEN-$1.00 TURKEY-$1.00 GOOSE-$1.00
SPECIAL A LA CARTE SERVICE'
Friday and Saturday Nights from 9:00 P. M. to 12:80 P. X.

fits of Sort

Willie Hoppe, (who has held the
world's title in balk line billiards for
16 years, went down to defeat before
Jake Schaefer at the billiard tourney
held at Chicago. Young Schaefer de-
feated the veteran Hoppe two nights in
succession. The first score was 400-26,
while the second score was 500-346.
Hoppe has the right to challenge the
winner within ten days,, but Schaefer
does not have to play before March 22.
Centre college had a hard time de-
feating Tulane University on Turkey
day at New Orleans. The "Fighting
Colonels" were unable to gain through

1
t
C
i
1

Foraheday s of society see "School
For Scandal."-Adv.

PARCEL
DELIVERY

TELEPHONE
2 70 0

(

TRUNKS
'N EVERYTHING

I

i.

Monday evening at 8:30 o'clock at the
Union alleys and continue every night
thereafter until the elimination opens.
There are 37 sentrjes thus far, and
more will be accepted until Wednesday
evening. With the exception ,of Mon-
day nights, when only four houses will
bowl, eight teams will appear onthe
program, the first four rolling at 7
o'clock, and the second quartet at 9
o'clock. At the conclusion of the first
qualifying round, the eight highest
teams will roll a second qualifying
round, the four highest to play off in
elimination. A qualifying series will.
consist of each member of the five man
team rolling three games, the total
score being the house score.
Following is the schedule of teams
thus far entered: Monday at 8:30
o'clock: Sigma Chi, Zeta Beta Tau,
Nu Sigma Nu, and Delta Upsilon;
Tuesday at 7 o'clock: Sigma Nu, Phi
Chi, Beta Phi Delta, Trigon; at 9
o'clock: Delta Tau Delta, Phi Gamma
Delta, Phi Sigma Delta, and Sigma
Phi Epsilon; Wednesday at 7 o'clock:
Cygnus, Alpha Sigma Phi, Alpha Delta
Phi, and Phi Delta Theta; at 9 o'clock:
Alpha' Tau Omega, Alpha Rho Chi,
Theta Chi, and Phi Rho Sigma; Thurs
day at 7 o'clock : Delta Chi, Phylon,
Zeta Psi, and Beta Theta Pi; at 9
o'clock: Phi Kappa Sigma, Psi Up-
silon, Delta Kappa Epsilon, and Alpha
Kappa Kappa; Monday, Dec. 5, at 8:30
o'clock: Kapa Nu, Hermitage, Theta'
Xi, and Sigma Alpha Epsilon; Tuesday
at 7 o'clock: Kappa Beta Psi, Chi Phi,
Phi Kappa Psi, and Acacia; at 9
o'clock: Sinfonia.
-(Continued on Page Eight)
"School For Scandal" snows Society
Within.-Adv.
TIIIS
COLUMN
CLOSES
TI SING AT 3 P.M.
FOR RENT
FOR RENT - Three furnished light
housekeeping rooms. Hot and cold
water in kitchen. 110 N. Ingalls
St. 51-5
FOR RENT - Share in large front
suite, steam heat; two double desks.
Phone 1194-M, 422 East Washing-
ton. 52-3
FOR RENT- Steam heated modern
apartment, unfurnished. 1713-M or
1661-J. J. Karl Malcolm. 52-3
WANTED
WANTED - For second semester of
this school year, unfurnished, heat-
ed light housekeeping apartment by
married student. Kitchenette and
private bath desired. Call Towsley
at 968-W. 52-4
WANTED-A Cook, Lambda Chi Al-
pha, 1511 Wasternaw. Phone 1299.
52-2

Shee'p
Moleskins, Cravene
Coats and Mac
KNICKERS, SUITS
Remember we are headquarters f
for Ladies and Men and have a l
Khaki, Whipcord, Corduroy, 0. I
Leather and Wrap Puttees.
Wool I

Finest Assortment of Auto
Blankets.

Ro
Pr

Tom Wy
any color "or style at $4.25, $7.00 a
sweaters for Ladies and children
High-Top Shoes, Munson Arm
in Slicker, Knee, Sport and Hip
fortable and highest quality Men's
Reg. 0. D. Wool Army Shirts, D
ity Wool Hose, Auto Gloves, Woo
Surplus Supplies S
"It pays to wal

to Illinois in which to play the Bruins
at Urbana next fall providing the men
of Zuppke travel to Berkeley the fol-
lowing year. George Huff, the Illini
director of athletics has not yet de-
cided whether to accept the offer or
not.
In 1900 the "U. of M." band, compos-
ed of 25 pieces, played at a dance in
Waterman gymnasium.
Have you sent in your scenario for
the University movie yet?
Enroll now-"School For Scandal."
-Ady.
STUDENTS LUNCH
409 EAST JEFFERSON
OPEN 6:30 A. M
TILL 11:00 P. M.
U
U
tts, Rain Coats, 0'-
kinaws, $8.50 up
AND BREECHES
or Sport, Hiking and Riding Togs
arge assortment to select from in
., Serge, etc. Also Sport Hose,
lan1Kets
bes, Steamer Rugs, and Army
iced $2.50 up.
Fe Coats
nd $7.50. Also a large showing of e
. It will pay you to come here. r
y and Dress Shoes, Rubber Boots t
styles. Lowest priced, most com-
and Boys' SHOES. e
)ress Shirts, Underwear, extra qual- t
1 and Leather Gloves of all kinds.
tore, 2133'N.4th Av.
k a few blocks"S
tice>
ye your Shoes repaired,
guaranteed work at the
WOMEN'S
Half Soles - $15 l
Leather Heels .35
Rubber Heels .50
Full Soles and
Heels - 2.50 1
thing but the

materials
1. Dieterle
Phone 1861-J

Thi

The van- HeuseR Collar

Van Esty59c
Get a couple today.
TIES
Knitted ties in diagonal stripes and special weaves.
65c to $2.00
Silk ties, also with diagonal stripes of varying widths-
something new.
85c to $1.50
DAVIS TOG GERY SHOP
119 South Main St.

fortable
wear the

Most Advertiserely Upon the
Pubic for All That They

Make and Sell

1'

Nol

is an

(SOFT)
entirely new, very low co]
It looks like-'a stiff collar
shirt. Needs no starching.

lEar, new lines, very con-
r but it will not wit nor

By J. R. HAMILTON
Former Advertising Manager of Wanamaker's, PhiladelphIa-
It is an ordinary thing these days to pick up the paper aw
see the manufacturer of some well-known automobie, fo
example, asking you for any suggestions toward the improv4
ment of his car; or to find a clothing manufacturer asking yo
to suggest a name for a standard suit- that he is putting out; o
even to see some maker of a staple product offering to have yo
try his goods at his expense.
A short time ago the whole of New York city was treate
to a can of milk for breakfast. A little bit later another city wa
invited to a dinner of pork and' beans absolutely free.
There is hardly a product today that you cannot buy an
send back again if it does not live up to th statements that wer
made about it in the advertisements.
You go to a store for a suit of clothes and later you find th
color fades. You take it back without the slightest hesitation
The storekeeper thanks you for helping him catch the error. 1
sends it on back to the manufacturer, and the chances are th
maker in turn will thank the storekeeper for helping to loca
the trouble in time and so saving his commercial neck.
Now, with a condition like this-with every effort possibl
being made to serve you, the buying public, does it seem fair o
your part to overlook this most important feature of trade-t
advertising?
If it weren't for the advertising and for the effort of every mar
ufacturer and every distributer to live up to what*he says in th
advertising, you would be robbed forty times a day and nobod
would care two straws.
The point is that the thing that protects you most, you pa
attention to least. It is absolute carelessness on your part I
spend yout money with any concern of any kind 'that does ni
place itself on record behind its merchandise. And not -only.
it careless to do so, but it works a positive harm to the men wb
are trying to uphold the standard of their goods and protect yoi
interests.
Now, suppose you lend your aid to the general cause an
maintenance of good goods.
Whatever you are going to buy, make up your mind to bt
through advertising. Give these makers and merchants the bet
efit.of your trade. Turn to the advertising in this paper and 54
what they have to sell. Patronize them with your pocketboo
You will get better service, bettergoods, better prices, and, be
of all, you will get more security than has ever been known befo
in the history of trade-and far more than ever would have be(
known if it hadn't been for this great publicity plan.
The constant reading of advertising is the price of comma
cial liberty for all of us.

Why pay more to ha
when you can have
fohowing prices.

LOST
LOST-In Union cloak room, Saturday
morning, tan overcoat with Dayton,
Ohio, label in collar. Will person
wno took by mistake notify Black-
inton, 1893-3. 52-2
LOST-Brown Hudson sable fur piece
between Alpha Phi house and
Church St., on S. University, Mon-
day night. 1535-M. Reward. 51-3
LOST - Brown silk umbrella with
black and white crooked handle at
Majestic. Reward. Return to Daily.
63-2
FOR SALE
FOR SALE-Young man's tweed suit.
Like new. Cheap.: Also top-coat
andovercoat.C 730 to 8:30 in eve-
ning. 215 S. Thayer St. , 53-2
FOR RENT
FOR RENT-A clean, warm, single
and double room. 311 Thompson.
53-2

MEN'S
Half Soles -
Leather Heels
Rubber Heels
Full Soles and
Heels -

$1.50
. .60

.60

3.00

We use
best

not
of

Henry O
343 So. Main St.

(Copyrighted.)

;.cr.. . A .S

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