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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 26, 1921 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-11-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Two THE MICHIGAN DAILY SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 1 1.

OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY
OF MICHIGAN
Published every morning except Monday during tke Univer-
sity year by the Board in Control of Student Publications.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use for
republication of al news dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
credited in this paper and the local news published therein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
class matter.
Suoscription by carrier or mail, $3.50.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press building, Maynard Street.
Phones: Business, 960; Editorial, 2414.
Communications not to exceed 300 words, if signed, the sig-
nature not necessarily to appear in print, but as an evidence of
faith, and notices of events will be published in The Daily at the
discretion of the Editor, if left at or mailed to The Daily office.
Unsigned communications will receive no consideration. No man-
uscript will be returned unless the writer incloses postage.
The Daily does not"necessarily endorse the sentiments ex-
pressed in the communications.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telep one 2414
MANAGING EDITOR........... BREWSTER P. CAMPBELL
Assistant Managing Editor..................Hugh W. Hitchcock
City Editor................................. E. P. Lovejoy, Jr.
Night Editors-
R. E. Adams G. P. Overton
Edward Lambrecht M. B. Stahl
Hughston McBain Paul Watzel
editorial Board Chairman.........................T. J. Whinery
Assistants-
S. T. Beach E. R. Meiss
L. A. Kern Leo Hershdorfer
Sunday Magazine Editor................Thornton W. Sargent, Jr.
Exchange Editor.................................George E. Sloan
M4usic Editor... ..............:...............Sidney B. Coates
Sporting Edit'r ................................ George Reindel
Women's Editor ..............................Elizabeth Vickery
Humor Editor ................................... E R. Meiss
Assistants
R. N. Byers L. L. Fenwick B. H. Lee
W. B. Butler H. B. Grundy E. Mack
A. D. Clark Agnes Holnquist Kathrine Montgomery
Harry C. Clark H. U. Howlett R. C. Moriarity
~jP. Comstock Marion Kerr R. B. Tarr
ohn P. Dawson L. S. Kerr Virginia Tryon
A. Donahue M. A. Klaver Dorothy Whipple
*W. F. Elliott Marion Koch ,. L.-Yost

J. B. Young

cases and taking care to make use of the regular
check rooms. The enterprising student detective who
catches a thief will not fare so bad financially and
incidentally will be doing a service to the commu-
nity. It is a regrettable fact that such measures be-
come necessary, but nevertheless it is an evil that
must be stamped out and we can all help by using
caution and keeping our eyes open.
TOO MUCH SPECIALIZATION
Economists inform us that this is the age of the
specialist - in other words the era in which the
progressive man spends his time acquiring a max-
imum of knowledge in one subject on the principle
that success depends largely on one's ability to ex-
cel in a particular line of activity. Much of the
efficiency of the age may be attributed to this doc-
trine of specialization. But when a mayor of a
large city finds it necessary, as does the mayor of
Philadelphia who has dedicated November 27 as
"Better Citizens' day", to set aside a day to em-
phasize the duty of the individual to go outside his
particular field for the common welfare, it becomes
evident that our modern specialization can be car-
ried to undesirable extremes.
Its bad influence shows itself in two ways. First
the modern individual as a specialist is so apt to
become so absorbed in his work that nothing else
interests him; and second, if he does show interest
in outside affairs he is likely to admit himself in-
competent to take part in them because of his lim-
ited field of knowledge and to refer them to other
specialists to be disposed of.
Because of his specialized knowledge the man
who, having spent a goodly portion of his life mas-
tering the intricacies of a particular field of en-
deavor thinks he can best be of service by narrowly
remaining within his own sphere of action, is of
some benefit to society. But by finding outlets for
his excess energy in matters of common interest
and sharing his burden in public affairs, his status
as a citizen will be raised considerably. Though he
may not at first be as fully informed on the matters
outside his field as he might desire to be, this is no
excuse for him giving up at the outset and leaving
things to those who do. It is for just this rea-
son - the acknowledgment by many American vot-
ers of inability to make public matters better - that
local, state, and national politics have for years
been honeycombed wth corruption.
The two evil influences that follow in the wake
of specialization may easily be avoided by temper-
ing specialization with a broad-minded interest in
all human affairs. And they must be avoided if
modern democracy is to come up to its largest pos-
sibilities.
SCUFFLING OF FEET
Evidence of a reinstatement of an old and ob-
jectionable evil has been noticed lately in some
classes where stamping of feet is practiced by a few
individuals in an effort to force the lecturer to dis-
miss the class before the hour is up. This is par-
ticularly discernible in "eleven o'clocks" when the
hungry scufflers are anxious to leave for lunch.
Such a practice is discourteous to say the least and
ought to be discontinued.
There are few courses offered in this University
which anyone is required to take. When a student
signs up for a subject he should be morally obli-
gated to give his attention during the hour he is in
the classroom. Scuffling of feet and other outward
signs of restlessnes not only stop others from pay-
ing attention but prevent the instructor from giving
his best to the class during the entire recitation or
lecture period.

DETROIT UNITED LINES
Ann Arbor and Jackson
TI31F TABLE
(Eastern Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars-6.o5 a.
in., 7:o5 a. m., 8:ro a. m. and hourly to 9:ro
Jackson Express Cars (local stops of Ann
Arbor), 9:48 a. m. and every two hours to
9:48 p. mn.
Local Cars East Bound--5:55 a.m., 7:00 a.
in. and every two hours, to 9:oo p. m., i:oo
p. m. To Ypsilanti only-1:4o p. m., 12.25
a. m., 1:15 a. m.
To Saline, change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars West Bound-7:5o a. m., 2:4o p.
i.
To Jackson and Kalamazoo-Limited cars:
8:48, 10:48 a. m., 12:48, 2:48, 4:48.
To Jackson and Lansing-Limited: 8:48
p. m.

1921

NOVEMBER
1 2 3

1921
4 5

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
BUSINESS MANAGER............ VERNON F. HILLERY
Advertising........................ F, M. Heath, A. J. Parker
Publication ..............................Nathan W. Robertson
Accounts...................................-John J. Hamels, Jr.
Circulation............................... Herold C. Hunt
Assistants
Burr L. Robbins Richard Cutting H. Willis Heidbreder
W. Cooley James Prentiss W. Kenneth Galbraith
L. Beaumont Parks Maurice Moule 3. A. Dryer
Walter Scherer . at in Goldring Richard Heidemann
Edw. Murane Tyler Stevens T. H. Wolfe
David Park Paul Blum
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 1921
Night Editor-G. P. OVERTON
Assistant-Julian E. Mack
Proofreaders-J. M. Bulkley
M. E. Gordon

6 7 8 9 10 11 12
13 14 15 16 17 18 19.
20 21 22 23 24 25 26
27 28 29 30
NOTICE TO MEN
We do all kinds of ighl-class Hlat
work at pre-war prices. Hats turned
inside out, with all new trimmings,
are as good as new.
FACTORY HAT STORE
617 PACKARD STREET
Telephone 1792
ADRIAN-ANN ARBOR BUS
SCHEDULE EFFECTIVE OCT. so, xgar
Read Down Central Standard Time
A.M. . P.M P.M. A&PM
Daily Daily Daily Daily
7:30 1:30 Lv... Adrian ...Ar. 7:00 12.45
8:o5 2:oS... Tecumseh ... 6:25 12:zo
8:25 2:25......Clinton ......6:o.. 1:50
9:15 3:15.....Saline.....:sr :oe
9:45 3:45 Ar Ann Arbor L. 4:45 10:30
A.M. . P.M P.M. A&PM
Read Up
SUNDAYS AND HOLIDAYS
P.M P.M.'
3:30 Lv... Adrian ..Ar 9:o0
4:05 .... Tecumuseh ...., 8:25
4:2S5 ...Clinton ... 8:05
S:15 Saline 7:15
54. Ar. Ann Arbor Lv 6:45
P-MP.M.
Chop Suey
CHINESE AND
AMERICAN RESTAURANT
Quang Tung Lo.
613 E. liberty

I

WITHOUT A DOUBT
the most unusual thing
we have ever done
HIGH CORDOVAN
SHOES

Rustcraft Agency
GRAHAM' S
1Both ends of diagonal walk

T""UTTr'"LE'S
A Place to bring your friends
Nowhere is the food better
Nowhere is the service more prompt
TUTTLE'S LUNCH ROOM
Maynard Street

r

NINE DOLLARS a

PAIR

Plenty of wide widths

THE PRICE INVESTIGATION
Ann Arbor's price problem should be threshed
out to a logical conclusion satisfactory to all legiti-
mate interests if the investigation program prof-
fered by the Association of Commerce and taken
up by the deans of the University is conscientiously
carried out. In volunteering to contribute five
hundred dollars to be matched by an equal appro-
priation by the Regents the merchants are going in
the right direction toward refuting any unjustified
charges of profiteering and gaining student confi-
dence.
Students in general are convinced that there have
been excessive prices charged in at least some of
their purchases in this city. As they may not be
able to show just who has been overcharging they
have become suspicious of all. It is said, and it may
well be the fact that a major part of the Ann Arbor
business men are contenting themselves with legit-
imate profits. If this is so students are entitled to
know without endlessly shopping around just who
is playing square, and those business men are en-
titled to all the trade college men take out of town
in an effort to purchase more advantageously. In
the purchases that students desiring staple goods
make elsewhere there is a big field for the business
men of this city and if they go after it right there is
no reason why they should not make large inroads
in it.
With the war over Ann Arbor prices should be
going back to normalcy with those in other cities. If
gross profiteering is persisting here there is no
doubt that the student body will be unanimously be-
hind the deans in any action they may take for its
protection. In showing the real situation in view of
all the circumstances in each case here the price in-
vestigation by an expert or experts will, if properly
carried out, be of inestimable value for determin-
ing the proper course of action by all parties inter-
ested.
CAMPUS THIEVERY
The notice recently posted about the campus of-
fering a reward for the arrest and conviction of any
person caught stealing property from University
buildings is a worthy step taken toward eliminating
the thief from our campus. These signs are sig-
nificant in themselves of the fact that again there
are weak-minded quick-fingered artists among us.
Many complaints have come in of late by students
who have lost their overcoats in the halls and check
rooms of the University buildings, and the sad fact
is that so many times the loss falls on the student
who can least afford it. The University authorities
have offered a reward of $50 for information lead-
ing to the arrest and conviction of any person steal-
ing property from University buildings and the
Union has followed suit by offering a reward of
$25 for the apprehension of anyone caught stealing
clothing from their cloak rooms.
There is a law that will justly punish the of-
fender, but the apprehension of the guilty parties
is the pressing problem. The students themselves
can aid greatly in this endeavor by reporting all

ALfrdi

Nickel'o Arcade

11wr.

'AWo

t A

Hear .Ye!

Hear Ye!

i

The Telescope

I

One of the College Wits
Dear Erm, I told a
Friend of mine
The other day
That MisterCoffey
Might put me in
The Dumb Bell Section,
And he said, "On
What grounds ?" The
Dearnphool.
-,-Dk. Black.
A Study in Geometry
Give me a kiss and I'll call it square.
I'd call it e flip tical.
Quoth Eppie Taff:
Oh, awful fate
That cost his life,
He tried to play cards
With his wife.

All you who are hungry and crave the best. Our ice cream
department will put out a special three layer brick for Sunday.
This time it is going to be honey fruit salad, lemon ice, and
strawberry cream. Don't miss it. Let us have your order
before 9 P. M.
Trube'y's

218 So. Main

Phone 166

~

_ _

w

I-Ie:
She:

Many a ham actor who is forced to dodge a
shower of ancient hen fruit would give two fingers
of his right hand if the crowd would only "Say it
with flowers". - Helen Blazes.
He Loves His Jokes
Bluebooks in me no awe inspire,
Professors, too, included;
A co-ed chique, in wrathy ire
I've never yet eluded.
I would not quake midst fire and smoke,
You'll find that's not my style,
I shake, though, lest my fav'rite joke
Won't even draw a smile.
- Zeke.
Pamous Closing Lines
"He's in the best of spirits," said. the brewer as
his son fell into a vat of beer. ERM..

Seven reasons why so many
students eat at the Arcade
1. Cleanliness
Kitchens and serving tables whose
cleanliness equals that of the most
meticulous home!
2
Z.............

b6 ...............
7 -- . ..........

The Arcade Cafeteria is
upstairs in Nickels' Arcade

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