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November 24, 1921 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-11-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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THEWEAHERwj ASSOCIATE
TH WAHEl 4)PRESS
PROBABLY SNOW ~ I DAY AND NIGHT
'TODAY 'BLs~itYcx
VOL. XXXII. No. 52 ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 1921, PRICE FVI

ARMS DELEGATES
TAK RECESS ON
THANKSGIV1ING DAY
FAR EAST, LAND ARMAMENTS AND
NAVAL PROGRAM PROBLEMS
AT CLOSE
FRANCE QUESTIONS
RIGHTS OF CHINESE
Premier Briand Wants Guarantees
from Other Powers Before
Disarming
Washington, Nov. 23. - When the
arms delegates quit -work for the
Thanksgiving day recess, these con-
siderations embraced the central
points of interest in their discussion:
Whether the effort to apply gener-
ally accepted principles to specific
cases in the Far East would bring
definite accomplishments or only lead
to futile debate.
Whether, in view of the position of
France and the general situation in
Europe, any serious attempts could be
nade to agree on a limitation- of land
armaments.
Naval Plans Move Slowly
Whether a way can be found to has-
ten consideration of details of ,the
naval limitations plan, which is pro-
ceeding smoothly but too slowly to
satisfy some of the delegates.
Of these questions the first was
brought sharply to the fore tonight
by several direct clashes regarding
elements of the Far Eastern negotia-
tions. At today's executive session of
the nine delegations, the right of the
Chinese delegates to speak for the
whole of China was reported to have
been questioned by France, and lat-
er a British interpretation of the
general principles already adopted
was challenged by some of the Chi-
nese.
Earlier in the day the land prob-
lem had been debated behind closed
doors by the delegates of the five
great powers, without further result
than the appointment of a sub-com-
mittee to consider collateral subjects
like the use of aeroplanes and pison
gases. Premier Brand of France,
making his farewell speech to the con-
ference, used the argument that his
country could not dis'arm unless he
had guarantees from the other pow-
ers, and although there were expres-
sions of sympathy from every other
national group, no one proposed any
formal joint separation of policy.
Delegate Impatient
Ow the side of th naval reduction
program developments were so com-
pletely out of the picture that some
of the delegates showed impatience
and pointed out the possible danger
that the negotiations might become
confused by too exhaustive discussion
of details. It is possible the naval ex-
perts will be asked to simplify their
methods so as to expedite action.
Tomorrow will be a day of rest so
far as meetings of the conference and
its sub-divisions are concerned, al-
though it may see some real progress
through consultation among .the va-
rious individuals and groups.
Dr. Herrington, '10D, Dies in Canada
Word has just been received from
Morse, Saskatchewan, Canada, of the
death of Dr. Grover Herrington, '10D,
who was for three years a member of
the Michigan Varsity football team.

His death was caused by an attack of
pneumonia.
NO DAILY FRIDAY
On account of Thanksgiving,
The Daily will not publish on
Friday morning. The Satur-
day morning issue will appear as
usual. .t

Turkey Dray With Meats,, rurits,
And Cheerful Atmosphere, Arrives

PRICES DISCUSSED
AT DEAN' MEET!

Prunes in the pantry, apples on the
fire, turkey in the oven-epicurean
choir!
And that is Thanksgiving! Take it
as you will.
Some prefer their's digestibly, some
prefer it lazily, or sentimentally, or+
thankfully, or religiously, or-oh well,
you know the way people think about
Thanksgiving, only how they would
BISHOP REMINGTON
TO SPEAK SUNDAY1
Eminent Episcopal Churchman De-
livers Three Addresses That
Day
PRESIDENT OF CHRISTIAN
ASS'N WAS FAMOUS ATHLETE
With the coming of Rt. Rev. Wil-
liam P. Remington, D.D., bishop suf-
fragan of South Dakota, to Ann Arbor
next Sunday, activities in University
religious circles will move with add-
ed impetus. Bishop Remington will
speak at 10:30 o'clock Sunday morn-
ing at St. Andrew's church and again
at 7 o'clock as the principal speaker
at the University service in Hill audi-
torium.
Leads Discussion
He has also promised to be present
at the Harris hall supper at 6 o'clock
Sunday evening as well as conduct a
discussion group in Lane hall follow-
ing the University service.
Bishop Remington is the youngest
bishop in the church and he is leaving
a string of worthy achievements be-
hind him. He is president of the Un-
iversity Christion association and is
said to "kick holes in the sky" in his
mission work in South Dakota. While
in college he won the intercollegiate
hurdles in 1900 and represented thej
University of Pennsylvania in the
Olympic games at Athens. During the
World war he served in France as a
chaplin.-,
Accepts Dinner Invitation
In addition he will be the principal
speaker at the annual dinner for Un-
iversity Episcopalians to be held at 6
o'clock Wednesday, Nov. 30, in the as-
sembly room of the Union. The toast-
mater will be Dean Warren L. Rog-
ers, '07, of St. Paul's cathedral, De-
troit. Douglas Dow, '22, will speak
for the undergraduates. Tickets for
the supper may be obtained at Harris
hall or at Wahr's.
WOMEN'S LEAGUE BEGINS
DRIVE TOR MEMBERSHIP

miss the turkey and cranberries, and
that nice, stuffed, after-dinner holiday
feeling, sitting around the fire, "too
full of a number of things" to do more
than blink wonderingly and ruminate
on your suppressed philosophical ten-
dencies, and feel vaguely what a great
person you might be if you tried-to-
morrow, sometime, only not just now.
And bluebooks are fover, or are
coming, - it doesn't matter much.
You're feeling too comfortable to care.-
All a blue book means today is an A,'
like the a in apples, and cramming is
something nice, like what's inside the
turkey and will spill out on the plate.
And the bluebook blue is a faint azure
of peacefulness.
And if Tranksgiving can do all thatf
-then thank the good Puritans for
their turkey, and enjoy the day as
you will.
COMPAY WORKS
WITH COLLEGES,
Professor Parker Lauds Engineering
Firm for Giving Problems
to Students
PLAN INCLUDES CRITICISM
OF PAPERS BY OFFICIAL
"Among the biggest constructive
steps made in recent years to aid en-
gineering education," is the way Prof.
John C. Parker of the electrical engi-
neering department, characterizes the
newly inaugurated practice of the
Western Electric and Manufacturing
company at East Pittsburgh, Pa., of
making actual mechanical and elec-
trical engineering problems available
to students in the nation's leading
technical schools.
A Bona Fide Plan
"The active interest of this organ-
ization in the improvement of engi-
neering education is not an advertis-
ing dodge or a bid for men," states
Professor Parker. "Rather it is due
to a realization that anything-that ben-
efits technical education is to the ad-
vantage of every engineering concern
in the country." The most remarkable
part of the proposition in Professor
Parker's opinion is that B. G. Lamme,
chief engineer, has undertaken per-
sonally to review papers selected by
the faculties each month as the best,
and criticise them for the benefit of
the students who prepared the ans-
wers.
Mr. Lamme, says Professor Parker,
is the biggest electrical machine de-
signer in the world, and students
should find it very much worth while
to compete for the opportunity of ob-
taining his criticisms.
First Series Received
Professor Parker has received the
first problems in the series. "They are
of an extraordinarily high grade," h
states. "These problems selected from
the day-to-day experience of a very
practical business firm show to a
striking degree a distinct interest in
pure, fundamental theory."

Request Sum of Money
Expert Probe of
Costs

to Carry on,
Local

CHAMBER OF COMMERCE BACKS
CAREFUL INVESTIGATION
Expert investigation of alleged high
prices in Ann Arbor is expected to
follow the action taken by the deans
in their conference yesterday. Thee
committe composed of Dean J. A.
Bursley, Dean H. M. Bates, and Dean
M. E. Cooley, which was appointed
some time ago to investigate price
conditions, made its preliminary re-
port.
Want Action
The deans are determined to get to
the bottom of the situation, and ac-
cordingly are requesting the Board of
Regents to appropriate a sufficient
sum to enable the University to en-
gage the services of an expert, who
will make a thorough and disinter-
ested investigation.
It is the sentiment of the deans that
no war is being waged against any
particular class, that the University
does not propose to align itself against
Ann Arbor business in'terests, but they
do propose to make a thorough sift
of existing conditions, and if profiteer-
ing is disclosed, to fix the responsi-
bility upon the responsible individ-
uals, and at the same time take defi-
nite steps to relieve the situation.
Business Men Agree
On the other hand, the Ann Arbor
Chamber of Commerce speaks with
equal zeal that the whole matter be
given a' thorough probe. In an inter-
view last night, Paul L. Proud, pres-
ident of the Chamber of Commerce and
chairman of the retail division which
has charge of the investigation of liv-
ing costs, said he believed prices are
as reasonable, considering the class
of merchandise and services given by
Ann Arbor stores, as anywhere else.
As to the attitude of the Chamber
of Commerce toward an investigation,
Mr. Proud said: "The Chamber of
Commerce desires to leave no stone
unturned in an attempt to arrive at
the facts of the situation and to this
end would be willing to raise any rea-
sonable amount of money necessary
for a thorough investigation."
EDWARD RECKLIN HERE
IN TWiLIGHT SERIES
PROGRAM INCLUDES WORKS FROM
EARLY LUTHERAN COM-
POSERS OF NOTE
As the first guest on the Twilight
Organ series, Edward Rechlin, organ-
ist of the Immanuel Lutheran church
of New York city, will give a program
of compositions by Lutheran compos-
ers in Hill auditorium at 4:15 o'clock
this afternoon.
His program is as follows:
Prelude B minor .............-
... . S. Bach (1685-1750)
Choral Preludes
"As Jesus Stood Before the
Cross"......................
.Samuel Scheidt (1587-1654)
"0 Sacred Head Now Wounded"
....Johannes Kuhnau (1660-1722)
"Praise God Ye Faithful" ......
..Dietrich Buxtehude (1637-1797)
Improvisations on a Lutheran Choral
Fantasle and Fugue............
....Karl Phillip Emanual Bach
(1714-1788)
Aria from concerto in D minor
.....George Haendel (1685-1759)
Adagio from Cantata, "God's Way
Is the Best Way" ....J. S. Bach
At Evening ........Frederick Reuter
Fugue in D major......... .S. Bach

Cerce Francais
Hears Van Gennef
Arnold Van Gennef, official lecturer
of the French Alliance, traveler, and
explorer, gave an illustrated lecture
at 7 o'clock last night in the Natural
Science auditorium, the subject of
which was "The Costumes of the
French Provinces"." Mr. Gennef con-
cluded the lecture by singing several
folk songs typical of the provinces.
The lecture was the first of a series
of four lectures given under the au-1
spices of the Cercle Francais.
SUGGESTIONS MADEI
FOR MOVE PLOTS
. t
Faults in Scenarios Already Submit-
ted Bring Comment From
Company'
PRODUCIBILITY SHOULD BE
CONSIDERED CHIEF ELEMENT1
Technical faults in the plot outlinesI
that have already been submitted for
the University motion picture that will
be produced on the campus within a
few months caused the issuance yes-
terday by a representative of the
cinema producing company, with
which The Daily has arranged the
picture, of some more definite sugges-
tions for the construction of scenarios.
Simple Story Wanted
The first element in a good plot, ac-
cording to the instructions issued yes-
terday, is its producibility, a thing
that involves both moderate expenses
of production and a simple and di-
rect appeal. Conservative manage-
ment requires that the scenes be easy
of construction and, in a University
picture such as the one planned, near
to the normal experienc'es of every-
day college life, where unlimited pos-
sibilities are offered for original
themes.
The simplicity of the plot should
not be complicated by irrelevent coun-
ter plots, an involved cast of char-
acters, excessive jumps in time, or
unnecessary shifts in locations. A
mere series of sprightly incidents
however unusual or well worded will
not make a plot unless they are cen-
tralized and subordinated to one con-
trolling objective. Each action and
motive must be logical and explainable
of iself, for the fast moving scenes of
the photoplay do not, allow the audi-
ence opportunity to settle the doubt-
ful points of the action.
Truth Not Necessary
The story does not have to be true,
in fact truth to recognized principles
is far more desirable than accuracy in
describing actual events. The inci-
dents must have more than a local ap-
peal, for general plausibility, combin-
ed with a recognized local color, is the
only thing acceptable to the national
audience before which the picture will
be given a showing.

HOLIDAY PROGRALI~
TOHE OPENED
HILL AUDITORI
PRESIDENT MEES, OF CAP
UNIVERSITY, WILL GIVE
ADDRESS
CONCERT SCHEDULEI
FOR THIS AFTERNC
Dances Planned by Union and
Women's Athletic Associatio
as Part of Festivities
Thanksgiving day activities wi
gin with University services a
o'clock in Hill auditorium. Otto
D.D., president of Capital univTE
Columbus, Ohio, will deliver th
dress on the subject, "The Natio
Its Youth". Prayer and scri
lesson will be by Rev. E. C.
horn, of Zion's Lutheran church,
the University choir under the
tion of George Oscar Bowen will
two hymns, "America" and
Danket".
Rechlin Will Play
Edward Rechln, organist of th
manuel Lutheran church, New
city, who has won wide recogniti
America's foremost interprete
Bach, will play "Our Father, Th
Heaven Above" by J. S. Bach. "I
by Reuter ,and an organ pos
Fugue, D major, composed by ,
Bach. The presiding officer, of
services will be Joyce M. Ste
'22.
The Women's Athletic assoc
will give a Thanksgiving dance
afternoon at the Armory, the'
ceeds from which will go towai
campaign fund for the new we
building. "Ike" Fischer's orc
will disperse pep in the form
sic while the refreshment boot]
add to the variety of the oce
Tickets can be procured today a
door of the Armory.
The Union has arranged for
cial matinee dance from 3 to 6 a
this afternoon, with the r
Union orchestra playing.
Inaugurate Organ Series
Edward Rechlin, who also pla
the University services today, w
the first guest at the Twilight
series at 4:15 o'clock in Hill at
ium. Mr. Rechlin has made a
versal appeal throughout the co
winning from the critics the ti
"America's foremost interprete
Bach. His early education wa
ceived at the Lutheran Normal
at Addison, Illinois.
Mr. Rechlin's first ambition w
be a teacher, but he gave up th
when he had become successful
concert organist. During the ti
has held his church position, i
studied extensively abroad wit
ropean masters such as Guilma
Widor.

HOUSE TO HOUSE CANVASS
PLAN TO PUT CAMPAIGN
OVER

IS!

Life memberships are being sought
by the Women's league in its house
to house canvass this week.
Susan Fitch, '24, is chairman of the
membership committee, with Anne
Broene, '22, Sadyebeth Heath, '24,
Blanch Kynast '24, and Margaret
Warthin, '23,,as her assistants. Other
women will be appointed to the com-
mittee later when the scope of the
work enlarges.
The membership fee is $50, payable
in five annual installments. All wom-
en who have earned 15 hours of
credit in the University are eligible'
Freshmen who will be eligible second
semester may sign pledge cards and
pay the first installment in February
when they will become members.
Women may sign up at a. booth in
Barbour gymnasium either day of the
Christmas bazaar. Any University
women who are not called on are re-
quested to telephone a committee
member for their cards.

Color Plates of Opera Costumes
Placed On, Lxhibition In WA

.

;
3
t
i
3 fi

WHAT WOULD YOU LIKE TO
READ IN THE DAILY?
What would you like to read
in The Daily? In what manner
can the faculties and facilities
of the University be made of
interest, value, and pratcical
aid-to students, faculty, and
others?
The Daily is much limited as
to the quantity of news which it
is able to print-it can exercise
choice in the general character
of that news. Mail your sugges-
tions to the City Editor, Michi-
gan Daily.

It is a whole window filled with pic-
tures of beautiful women, oriental
women, society women, butterflies,
creations reminding one of the-latest
fashion plates and yet more distinc-
tive. Each passerby pauses before
Wahr's State street bookstore win-
dow in his hurrying through the rain
to view the georgeous outlay. But
these exquisite "young ladies" will
not long remain inanimate; soon they
will blossom as the rose, when the
curtain rises on "Make it for Two"
at the first performance Dec. 5 at the
Whitney theater.
Blue, yellow, green, lavender, gold,
orange, a harmonious riot of color,
greets the drab student as he hur-
ries past, color and warmth sweetly
suggestive of the delights of the1

"young beauties" who will w
creations designed by Lester
cago. When those "gorgeous
ine" members of the opera ca
their stand before the footlig
won't be able to tell - but w
the gleaming white shoulders
distinctive creations defy wor
First catching the eye is th
ing Girl" with her -red and w1
tume in contrast to the flashi
skates upon her feet. Then
a yellow and black creation
just jumps out and holds you
and proud is the figure in wh
the poise with which "she"
"her" majestic head with its
covering calls for more tha
mere approval. And those
costumes and the wearers o
!costumes!

U U

BOX OFFICE SALE
-TO--
MEMBERS OF UNION
-AT -
LOBBY OF UNION
TUESDAY, Nov. 29
2:00 TO 5:00 P. M.

MAIL ORDERS FROM MEMBERS OF THE UNION FOR TICKETS TO

"MAKE

IT

FOR

TWO"

16TH ANNUAL UNION OPERA
PLAYING AT WHITNEY THEATER WEEK OF DECEMBER 5TR
Should Be in Hands of Treasurer at Union on or before Tomorrow, November 25. Get Envelopes at Main Desk in Lobby
GENERAL BOX OFFICE SALE BEGINS AT WHITNEY THEATER DECEMBER 1

BOX OFFICE Si
-FOR -
UNIVERSITY WON
-AT-
HILL AUDITORIUI
WEDNESDAY, Nov.
2:00 TO 5:00 P. N
SLIPS INDICATING PLA(
LINE FOR THIS SALE NO
TAINABLE AT BARBOUR

s

U

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