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November 23, 1921 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-11-23

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THE WEATHER
CLOUDY AND COLDER
TODAY

Adot - A p
-dL-.Awo -dAL M6.

4:Iatg

ASSOCIATEI
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT 1
SERVICE

#T

VOL. XXXII. No. 51 ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 1921 PRICE FIVE 4

m OVE~S SLOWVLY ON
FAR EAST TOPICS
DISARMAMENT DELEGATES PASS
FROM GENERALITIES TO
DETAILS
FRENCH PLAN FOR ARMY
LIMIT EXPECTED TODAY

Further Action on American
Building Program Also
Possible

NavalI

Washington, Nov. 22.-The negotia-
tions relating to both armament lim-
itation a.nd the Far East moved more
slowly today as the attention of the
arms delegates passed from general
policies to specific details. China's
economic embarrassment formed the
bulk of the Far Eastern discussion,
which resulted in the appointment of
sub-committees of the representatives
of nine nations to study the whole
question of autonomy of the Chinese
republic with particular reference to
treasury and tax restriction.
Discuss Army Limits
The land armament problem was
considered at various informal confer-
ences during the day, and a meeting
of the armament commttee of the
whole was called for tomorrow with
the expectation that Premier Briand,
of France, would say a last word as
to his country's attitude on reduction
of armies. It is understood that he
expects to bring the question to the
point of a formal expression by the
conference before his departure for
France.
On the side of naval armament, in-
formal exchanges continued between
individual delegates and naval experts
with an air of growing confidence that
details of the American plan, although
requiring considerable time for de-
termination, would eventually bring
all the powers into agreement.
Naval Plan May Come Up
It is probable that the naval plan
may receive consideration at tomor-
row's meeting of the five delegations
which constitute the armament com-
mittee of the whole, but the greater
attention is expected to center on land
armaments in view of the imminence
-of M. Briand's departure. It i the
preservation of her armies with the
moral backing of the principal powers
that most interests France at the
present stage of the negotiations, and
'it is known that M. Briand would be
pleased t take back to France with
him a fomal conference endorsement
of the position he has taken against
material reduction.
MEES, CAPITAL UNIVERSITY,
WILL SPEAK HERE TURSDAY
,"The Nation and Its Youth" Is the
Theme of Thanksgiving Day
Services
Pres. Otto Mees, of Capital Univer-
sity, Columbus, Ohio, will speak on
"The Nation and Its Youth"' at the
University Thanksgiving services in
Hill auditorium tomorow morning at
11 o'clock.
Edward Rechlin, who is to give an
organ recital in the afternoon, will be
the organist at this service.
SMOKER FOR GLEE, MADOLIN
CLUB COMMITTEEMEN TONIGHT
Varsity Glee and Mandolin club
committeemen. will be entertained at a
smoker to be held at 8:30 o'clock to-
night at the Union. The purpose of
the meeting is a get-together for all
of the men interested in the work of
the organization. Plans for the busi-
ness management of the coming fall
concert next Tuesday will also be dis-
cussed.

Prof. Mouirhead,
English Scholar,'
To Speak Friday
"Causes of War and Peace" will be
the subject of a lecture delivered at
4:15 o'clock Friday afternoon in the
Natural Science auditorium by Dr.
John Henry Muirhead. Dr. Muir-.
head, who is professor of philosophy
in the University' of Birmingham,
Eng., will discuss the subs==from
an angle with which th average
American citizen is perahps not en-
tirely familiar. The lecture is given
under the auspices of the University
and will be free to the general public.
SEATS AVALBLE
FOR XMAS SHOWS
Tickets for Itinerary Performances of
Opera Will Be Sold Here
to Students:
SALE TO BE HELD IN UNION
LOBBY FRIDAY AND SATURDAY
Application blanks may be secured
the end of this .week for seats in any
theater in which "Make It for Two",
the 1922 Union Opera, plays during its
Christmas tour of the middle west.
Although seats may be secured at
the box office of the theaters in the
various cities on the opera route,
many students desire to secure tick-
ets for the production here in Ann
Arbor. In consequence, the Union
officials are having regulation blanks
printed,and will issue them on Fri-
day or Saturday of this week in the
lobby of the Union.
Women of the University may still
obtain application blanks at Barbour
gymnasium. Each blank bears a num-
ber which will entitle the holder to a
place in line by preference when an
exchange is made at Hill auditorium
on Wednesday, Nov. 30.
Yearly members of the Union were
issued blanks Monday. Members of
the Union who have not obtained tick-
ets by Nov. 29 will have a final chance
to get them on that day in the lobby
of the Union. The general box office
sale at the Whitnew theater will open
on Dec. 1.
THAKSGIING DNCE,
TO BE GIEN BY WIA
Bring your best girl to the Arm-
ory tomorrow afternoon and forget
your Thanksgiving homesickness!
Music, by "Ike" Fischer, pep, and a
booth where it will be possible to. buy
all kinds of light refreshments - all
of these will be present to drive away
the blues.
The members of the Women's Ath-
letic association will be hostesses,
and they are giving this party with
a double purpose in mind. They wish
to help make it a pleasant day for
those who are obliged to partake of
boarding-house turkey instead of the
much-longed-for home variety, and
they are endeavoring to raise funds
for the association in order that it
may be able to do its part in giving
to the campaign fund for the new
women's building.
Tickets are now on sale at Gra-
hgm's bookstore at $1 a couple, and
will also be sold on Thursday after-
noon at the door of the Armory.

INTERFRATERNITY MARATHON
WON BY PHI SIGMA DELTA

IRISH TENOR PROVES
AGAIN HIS SUPREMACY
Practically All-English Program Dis.
plays Great Interpretative
Power of Singer
(By Edmund Thomas)
Typically McCormack, and such as
none but he could give, the concert by
John McCormack in Hill auditorium'
last night but proved again the su-
premacy of the Irish tenor in singing
the songs of the people before an
auditorium packed and overflowing.
Reaching its climax in the last
number, "The Lord Is My Light" by
Allitsen, the concert was a continued
triumph for the singer and time and
again was 'he brought back to meet
the applause.' Triumphing not by
means of his voice but by a power to
reach the hearts of his hearers and
touch them, McCormack held his audi-
ence through a practically all-English
program of songs, with one group of
Irish Folk songs in which he did his
most perfect interpretative work.
A breath control almost marvelous,
a diction in English and French most
remark.ble among opera singers, and
a depth of sentiment and ability to
express it, rare in the extreme, were
the outstanding features of Mr. Mc-
Cormack's concert, which, like all of
his concerts, was constructed to ap-
peal to the taste of the great mass
of people, and, again like all of them,
entirely fulfilled its purpose. How-
ever, his singing of "L'Alba Separa"
displayed that operatic talent which
packs the New York Hippodrome
every time it is- advertised.
As supporting artist, Donald Mc-
Beth probably did his best work in
"Obertass" by Wieniawski in which
he more nearly gave the selection
what it deserved interpretatively, let-
ting his technique become subservient
to' his art. The work of Mr. McBeth
is rather immature in its understand-
ing of the requirements of his num-
bers, while his technique, the factor
on which his playing recommended it-
nkguitihrUni-oolo.ebeTpSpB
X-SNTO BURTON TO
SPEAK HERE SATURDAY

JOHN MCORMACK
THRLSHUGE HILL"
AUDITORIUM CROWD

RECITAL CONSTRUCTED TO
PEAL TO THE MASS OF
PEOPLE

AP-

Rechlin Will Be
Artist At Organ
Concert Thursday
Edward Rechlin, organist of Im-
manual Lutheran church, New York
city, who has won wide recognition
as America's foremost interpreter of
the works of Bach, will be the first
guest on the Twilight Organ series
at 4:15 o'clock tomorrow afternoon
in Hill auditorium. Besides his or-
gan recital, Mr. Rechlin will take
part in the University Thanksgiving
service at 11 o'clock Thursday morn-
ing.
Mr. Rechlin has appeared in prac-
tically all cities in which organs of
note exist and has won continual ap-
proval from his audiences. He re-
ceived his early training at the Luth-
eran Normal school at Addison, Illi-
nois. His early ambition was to be a
teacher, but he soon gave this up be-
cause of his successful workas a con-
cert organist. Since 1905 he has fill-
ed the church position which he now
holds in New York city, his duties
being interrupted by extended study
abroad with such masters as Gul-
mant and Widor.
DENS WILL HEAR
REPORT ON PICES
Investigation Committee to Disclose
Findings at Conference This
Afternoon
RETAIL MERCHANTS OFFER TO
RAISE $500 TO AID IN WORK
The" committee recently appointed
by President Marion L. Burton to in-
vestigate living prices in Ann Arbor
will make its report this afternoon
at a 'conference of the deans of the
University.
No information is at present avail-
able as to possible action of the Uni-
versity authorities, except that they
will co-operate with the Ann Arbor
Chamber of Commerce in thoroughly
investigating the situation. In a res-
olution passed by the retail merchants
section of the Chamber of Commerce
Monday night it was reconmended
that the merchants raise a sum of
$500 to defray the expenses of such
an investigation, provided that the
University raise a similar sum.
Ann Arbor merchants feel that Uni-
versity officials are not justified in
charging them with asking higher
prices than are asked in other cities,
and they are willing to give funds
to settle the question. "If we are
right," said one merchant, "we shall
be of service both to Ann Arbor and
the University, for the charge of prot-
iteering is detrimental to both. If
we are wrong we are willing to take
our medicine."

ATTENTION SENIORS I I
Collection of '22 class dues
will continue today. Dues are
lower this year than they have
been for some time and there-
fore it is essential that all those
who have not paid should do so
at once. The booth where dues
may be paid is located in Univer-
sity hall across from the regis-
trar's office. Office hours from
9 to 3 o'clock.
(Signed)
Walter B. Rea, President,
Martha Shepard, Vice-president,
Thomas C. 'Truss, Secretary,
C. Maurice Atkinson, Treasurer.
FUNDS FOR CO MPLETION
Of NEW HOSPITAL NT
AVILABLE__UNTIL19 22
Money for the completion of the new
University hospital will nbt be forth-
coming until after the first of the
year according to a decision given
out by the state adminstrative board.
Three hundred thousand dollars was
asked to complete the structure but
this is not enough and more is de-
sired. However, at present the state
is short of money and the board found
that it was impossible to grant more
money until 1922.
The University asked for $650,000
yesterday, of which 1300,000 was to
come from the mill tax fund; $50,000
is desired for the purchase of landi
and the $300,000 is to go towards the3
completion of the hospital.
News of the Day
IN BRIEF
Washington, Nov. 22.-A final vote
on the tax revision bill will be taken
by the senate at not later than 5
o'clock tomorrow under a unanimous
consent agreement entered into to-
day after the measure had been un-
der debate for several hours. Im e-
diately upon its passage the bill will
be sent to the President.
Chictgo, Nov. 22. - The Chicago,
Milwaukee, and St. Paul railroad, act-
ing independently of other lines, today
announced freight rate reduction,
ranging as high as 40 per cent on
some commodities, on shipping from
the middle west to the Pacific coast,
destined for the Hawaiian Islands.
The reductions are made to meet Pan-
ama canal shipping competition, and
will cover shipping from the east as
soon as arrangements can be made
with eastern roads, it was announced.

MANY CHANGES Al
LANSING URGED]
MERS IN REPOI
MESSAGE TO GOVERNOR DEPI
DEPLORABLE CONDITIONS
AT STATE SCHOOL
WOULD PUT BOARD OF
EDUCATION IN CHAR
1ntelliglence Tests Reveal Only
Per Cent of Students to Have
Normal Minds
Following- a eek's investigatio
deplorable conditions found to pre
at the State Industrial Shool
Boys at Lansing, Prof. George
Myers, of the vocational education
partment, who directed investigat
yesterday submitted to Glove
Groesbeck a. statement of conditi
together with more than a d(
recommendations for improvem
among which it was requested
"to avoid political brawl" the insi
tion be placed under direction of
State Board of Education, in plac
its former position as a penal i
tution.
Make Readjustment Easy
Other changes proposed by Prc
sor Myers were that the institu
provide a system of placement
folow up for boys leaving the i
tution so that they may "read
themselves to society and become
ful, self respecting citizens".
Regarding vocational educatio
was stated that out of the 512 boy
the institution only 60 had any
tact with shop work of a mor
less skilled nature, and that V
were conducted on a far less eic
basis than- the average factory..
hisreport Professor Myers states
"very few go out even .with the
ginnings of skilled occupation",
that "it is our deliberate opinon b
on this study that the great maj(
of boys return to society worse o
adjustment than when they cam
Only 27 Per Cent Normal
Intelligence tests conducted
Prof. Guy M. Whipple, of the ex
imental education department,
sisting Professor Myers, reported
only 27 per cent of the students v
of normal intelligence, that 38 per
were actually feeble minded and
no distinction was made bet
these classes. Feeble minded
were placed many times in resp(
ble positions, and required to
skilled work, while boys of
grade intelligence were forced t
bor at the dullest routine work.
Boys were required to sit in Be
seats in many cases entirely too s
for them. School rooms were pc
lighted and ventilated and s
equipment was found woefully i
ing.

DUES NOTICE

Phi Sigma Delta won the first an-
nual interfraternity marathon staged
by the Intramural department Tues-
day afternoon over the Varsity three
mile course, finishing men in sixth,
fourteenth, and fifteenth places. Indi-
vidual honors went to Isbell of Sigma
Nu, who completed the course in the
fast time of 14:47:2. Neely of Alpha
Chi Rho was second. The following
teams finished in the 'order named,
many other houses were entered but
failed to finish three men: Phi Sigma
Delta, Phylon, Theta Chi, Phi Gamma
Delta, Beta Theta Chi, Delta 'Upsilon,'
Beta Theta Pi, Kappg Beta Psi, Phi
Kappa Psi, Alpha Sigma Phi, Delta
Tau Delta, Phi Delta Theta, Zeta Psi.
Players Club Masque Ball Postponed
It has been found necessary to post-
pone indefinitely the Players club
masque ball, scheduled for tonight.

Ex-Senator Theodore Burton, of
Ohio, who is the second lecturer on.
the course offered by the University
Oratorical association, will delivei- an
address on "Our Foreign Policy"
(with a discussion of the Conference
for the limitation of armaments) at
8 o'clock Saturday evening, Nov. 26,
in Hill auditorium.
Senator Burton has been regarded
as an authority on economics, finance,
and taxation questions, resulting from
a wide experience from many years in
both houses of congress, from a pro-
fessorship of economics at Oberlin,
and as president of the Merchants'
National bank of New York City.
Burton'is the author of the follow-
ing books: "Financial Crises and
Periods of Industrial, and Commercial
Depression," "Corporations and the
State," and "Some Political Tendenc-
ies of the Times and the Effect of the
War Thereon."
THANKSGIVING DAY PARTIES
BEING PLANNED BY UNION
Special arrangements for the ob-
servance of Thanksgiving day are be-
ing made by the Union, with two spe-
cial dances planned during mid-week.
A special matinee dance from 3 to
6 o'clock Thursday afternoon has been
arranged for, with the regular Union
orchestra playing.
The dance on Thanksgiving eve for
which the Engineering society has
been given preference will also have
the regular features of week-end
dances. The ladies' dinug room will
be opened during the evening to
dancers, although no refrshments will
be served in the room..

UNION ENTERTAINS{
WORKERS OF DRIVE
FOR LIFE MEMBERS
More than 200 workers on the 1921
Union life membership campaign were'
entertained at a banquet last night in
the Union assembly hall, given by the
Union in recognition of the services
of, the committeemen in reaching the
year's quota of life members.
Maynard A. Newton, '22, general
chairman of the drive, acted as toast-
master. R. Emerson Swart, '22E,
president of the Union, presented the
silver loving cup donated by Otto C.
Hans, 'OOL, to be a regular yearly
trophy for the highest individual
salesman, to E. C. Stark, '24, this
ayear's winner. ~
Archie McDonald, '22L, then gave a
short humorous talk, interspersed
with some impersonations. Tommy
Thomas' orchestra played special mu-
sic during the course of the evening.
KAUFFMAN, EHLERS TO SPEAK
AT BOTANICAL CLUB MEETING

Washington, Nov. 22.-Senor Felix
Cordova-da Vila, resident commis-
sioner from Porto Rico, was instruct-
ed in a cablegram received today from
San Juan to request President Hard-
ing to remove Gov. E. M. Mont Reily
immediately from that office. tThe
cablegram set forth in detail the spe-
cific charges which were to be pre-
ferred with the request. It was sign-
ed by 39 of the 58 members of the
Porto Rican assembly.

Berlin, Nov. 22.-In a statement to
the Associated Press today the Ger-
man government officially takes issue
with the charges of Premier Briand,"
of France, in his address before the
Washington conference, that the Ger-
man police forces at the Reichsehr
constitute a nucleus for a future Ger-
man army.
Washington. Nov. 22. - The- Irish
question was brought before the sen-
ate late today with the introduction of
a resolution by Senator LaFollette,
Republican, Wisconsin, to express the
hope of the senate for the success of
the present negotiations in London.
Commerce Club Elects Officers
New officers were elected at the
meeting of the Commerce club last
night as follows: H. N. Rath, '22,
president; Velma L. Carter, '24, vice-
president; R. J. Haven, '23, secretary;
T. R. Slatery, '23, treasurer.

Dues may be paid by the sen-
ior and junior lits all today in
the booths on the campus. Soph-
omore and freshman dues can
be paid in the morning only.
Have you sent in your scenario for
the University movie yeti

Advise Many Changes
Recommendations submitted w
that more use be made of motion p
tures, educational films and n<
service as well as "suitable drama
and comic films", and that the sch
days be.lengthened to correspond
those of public schools. . At pres
the average school day at the in
tution is three and a half hours lc
as compared to the five and a half h
day in public schools.
Of the 15 teachers employed
were women, and with the excepi
of the superintendent none of th
were trained to deal with pupils
low mentality. Their salaries w
found to be much lower than th
given to the average public sch
instructor. It was recommended I
at least half of the teachers be m
and that suitable salaries be paic
order to obtain specialized instr
ors.
VAN GENNEP TIRST TO TALK
ON CERCLE FRANCAIS SEE
Dr. Arnold van Gennep will del
the first of a series of lectures un
the auspices of the Cercle Fran
at 7:30 o'clock this evening in- Nat
Science auditorium. He will take
his subject, "The Costumes of
Provinces of France." The lecture
be illustrated.

Prof. C. H. Kauffman, of the botan-
ical department, and Mrs. Lois S.
Ehlers will have charge of the meet-
ing of the Botanical Journal club at
8 o'clock tonight in room 173, Natural
Science building.
Professor Kauffman will review a
book on "Yeasts" by Guilliermond
(English translation by Tanner),
while Mrs. Ehlers will review "Con-
tributions to a History of American
Geological and Natural History Sur-
veys" by George,?. Merrills.

Soph Lits May Pay Dues Today
Soph lits have a last chance to pay
their class dues today between 8 .and
12 o'clock at University hall.

Sundwall Returns From En
Dr. John Sundwall, director
students physical welfare depar
has returned from a trip throt
East, where he attended a medi
sociation meeting.

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