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November 22, 1921 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-11-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 1921

--- - - - - - -__ _ _.. . -,--rr--- ....._

Fragrant Blend
steadfast friend,
rich and mellow
as old wine;
every day
more men say
AI L : __
In-COm-p-r-by fie-!
ENGLI O
JT lended in the Good' Old E$nglish

.

'Why Do Students Change Courses?'
Faculty Asks Junior engineers

S
Wag

I r rrrr rw r n.wnr -
- E

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I

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f

Looking for something dainty and practicle for presents.
They know the place and are on the way to
"The Quarry"
G. CLAUDE DRAKE
Proprietor

Thanksgiving Sale

On the average, the senior engine-
ering class is half its freshman size,"
said Prof. W. C. Hoad, of the sanitary
engineering department, in regard to
the problem of curricula change
which he is investigating. The facul-
ty is asking the engineering class of
1923 to give its opinions as to why stu-
dents change from engneering to lit-
erary, law, medicie, and other courses,
because '23 is the first normal class
since the beinning of the war. In ad-
dition the engineering college has
morecomplete records of high school
and college work of the present junior
engineers than of others.
More than 570 members of this class
took the special mentality examina-
tions in their freshman year. These
EDUCAIONALINSTITUTE
FOSTERS ESSAY CONTEST
PROPOSES SUBJECTS CONNECTED
WITH FAR EASTERN
QUESTION
World-political questions of the far
East bearing on the present Arma-
ment conference will be taken as sub-
jects for essays submitted in a prize
contest to be conducted by the Insti-
tute of International education. This
organization, with headquarters in
New York city, is offering prizes of
$150, $100, and $50 for the best es-
says submitted. Undergraduates in
any college or university in the United
States are eligible to compete.
The essays may be written on any
one of three specified subjects. The
first deals in general with the open
door in China, the second with Jap-
an's problem of rapidly increasing
population, with the question of how
that country can accomodate her
growing population without infringing
on the rights of other countries, and
the third with the problem of the re-
lations of the far East with the West.
All manuscripts for the contest
must be turned in by Jan. 1, 1922.
Full information may be secured from
the President's office.
GRADUATE CLUB
ELECTS OFFICERS
Officers were elected for the year
1921-1922 at the first meeting of the
Graduate club this year,as follows:
Bernard L. Beckwith, president; Lu-
cilla J. aHll, vice-president; John F.
Ross, secretary; T. Lutler Purdom,
treasurer.
Dean Alfred H. Lloyd of the Gradu-
ate school pointed out in his address
last week to the members of the club
that the school aimed at greater free-
dom in study similar to that which
characterizes the work of the Eur-
opean universities.
The club proposes to hold a series
of monthly social gatherings for
graduate students, stressing the get-
acquainted idea.
An important social event is being
planned for the near future and will
be announced in the Daily Official
Bulletin.
Phillips Scholarships Awarded
Four students will be recommend-
ed to the Regents for Phillips schol-
arships; Frances C. Bonner, '25 and
Bessie Ione Palmer, '25, on examina-
tion and Winifred Smeaton, '24, and
Mary Jeanette Loughin, '24, for a sec-
ond year.
The Phillips scholarships are
awarded annually to candidates for
the degree of bachelor of arts, the
examinations being given in Latin or
Latin and -Greek, sucessful candi-

dates being required to continue the
study of both languages for the year
in which they hold the scholarships.
-!
MAN'S-
MALED
MI kS
! !
ti at
- MansDu!tr
21!oth Mi!Sre

records have ben studied carefully
and have been correlated with the.
college data from semester to semest-
er.
"We are studying this class of 1923
quantatively and qualitatively," con-
tinued Professor Hoad. 'The faculty
wants to know wh ymen drop out andi

1

Thanksgiving
DUCK AN DINNER - cts
THE HOMESTEAD
615 East Liberty St.
We take this opportunity to announce to Ladies and Gentle-
men looking for a place to board or contemplating changing
from present place that we have secured the services of a
competent man and wife for our kitchen, which means Home
Cooking throughout.
We cordially invite Ladies and Gentlemen to give "The Homestead" a trial.
With Mrs. Maynard supervising the Dining Room we assure you courtesy
and we aim to render service. If you don't get it, kindly report to us. Thank
you.

STUD ENTS
We carry a general line of supplies to meet your requirements.
PRICE, QUALITY and SERVICE
STUDENTS SUPPLY STORE
I 111 So. UNIVERSITY AVE.

to what extent it occurs in normal
engineering classes. To do this we
are asking every Junior engineer to
81l out a card listing the reasons why
he thinks men change their courses
from the engineering college to others.
They are also requested to give any
information they can relative to why
others they know have left the en-
gineering school."
These cards should be left in Pro-
fessor Hoad's office, 306 Engineering
building as soon as possible.

4

4l

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For A La Carte Service we Sell

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a Ticket worth $5.50 for $5.00

Yours for Business,
The Homestead
Management

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it I

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CHINESE AND
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formerly sold for $10, $12, and $14
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world-renowned tenor who will be
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this Evening,

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64174 I'm Falling in Love with Someone
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64343 A Little Love, a Little Kiss
64425 My Little Grey Home in the West
64426 My Wild Irish Rose
64428 Beautiful Isle of Somewhere
64499 The Vacant Chair (with Male Chorus)
64837 That Tumble Down Shack in Athione
64814 When You Look in the Heart of a Rose
64875 Dear Old Pal of Mine
64664 Star Spangled Banner
64926 (a) The Next Market Day
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