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November 17, 1921 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-11-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

-n Schedule

'his Saturday

Harvard meets Yale next Saturday in
the most important game scheduled for
that day and the last of the games
between the -Big Three. Figures
show that Yale should win the en-
counter for they beat Princeton last
week by a score of 13 to 7 and the
Tigers took over the Crimson the
week-before, 10 to 3. In this last game
all the scoring was done in the last
quarter. Princeton's touchdown was
made by a 64 yard run of Gilroy while
during the three other periods Harvard
held E nd even outplayed the Tigers.
The Blue completely outplayed Prince-
ton in their struggle last week and
earned their victory by good football.
An outstanding feature of the game
was the power and strength shown by
the Eli line. Time and again Lourie
and Garrity attempted to break
through but not a weak spot was found.
The Crimson line was perhaps a little
better than the Tiger forward wall,
but did not completely outplay it, as
the Bull Dog line did. In Aldrich who
has scored more points than any oth-'
er man this year Yale has a back who.
can punt, place kick, run the ends,
pass, and hit the line with terrific
power. O'Hearn and Jordan are two
other backs who are also to be feared,
Harvard Team Rested
While Yale was exerting every-ef-
fort against the Tigers, the Harvard
second team won from Brown, 9 to 7,
while the regulars were away with in-
structions to forget football for the
week end. This rest will do a lot
of good and is what is counted on by
supporters of the Crimson to help the
team come through. Coach Fisher who

saw the Yale-Princeton game says that
his team will furnish stronger oppo-
sition than did the Tigers. Whether
this opposition will be strong enough
to defeat the powerful Yale eleven is
exceedingly doubtful.
WOULD HAYK NATIONAL'
SPORTSASSOCIATIO N
SUGGESTION MADE THAT ALL AM-
ATEURS UNITE UNDER °
ONE HEAD
(Clipped from New York Times, Nov.
. 14 issue.)
The proposal of secretary of war,
John W. Weeks, that all existent am-
ateur sports organizations be joined
in one association, national in scope, is
a most important one. Already the
leaders in the several lines of sport
activities have come out strongly in
favor of the idea. One of the chief
aims, as announced by the sponsor of
the movement, is to upbuild the man-
hood and womanhood of the nation
by making athletic exercise more gen-
eral.
It is apparent from the letter of Sec-
retary Weeks that he gave the idea
long and serious thought before mak-
ing his plan public. The idea, in a gen-
eral way, is perhaps the best that has
been offered in amateur sports in
years, and with the official stamp of
the government behind it the worth
of the plan is increased. The difficulty

will be in putting into operation the
numerous features which Secretary
Weeks has outlined. This can prob-
ably be accomplished, but the vastness
of the proposition requires slow ac-E
tion and the avoidance of the many
pitfalls which would all but wreck
the plan.
eFtterThe Hero"
A 1t league Party
"Enter the Hero,," a one-act comic
tragedy, will be presented by Mum-
mers at 4 o'clock Friday afternoon in
Sarah Caswell Angell hall as the fea-
ture of the Women's league party.
The cast is as follows: An imaginative
girl, Anne Carey, Dorothy Jeffrey, '24;
her younger sister, Laurella Hollis,
'24; Mrs. Carey, Rose Tobias, '23; and
the hero himself, Harold Lawson, Ce-
cile Baer, '22. Following the play there
will be dancing and refreshments in
the gymnasium.

Alice .lbrad y Isc
"Forever After"
Star Here Eriday
William A. Brady will present his
daughter Alice Brady at the Whitney
theater, Friday and Saturday, Nov. 18
and 19, in "Forever After," her great-
est success on the speaking stage. It
is a play of youth and love, war and
faith, which ran for 344 consecutive
performances in New York. It de-
picts the story of the ombitions of a
rich mother for her daughter, who
loves outside the "set" and of a boy
whose pride causes him to falsely re-
nounce his sweetheart.
Miss Brady is first seen as a girl of
sixteen (and she is said to look the
part with ease) and later as a finished
young woman. Her role runs the
gamut of human emotions. Her ap-
pearance here will be one of the events
of the season.
Patronize our Advertisers.--Adv.

A Reliable Jeweler
CHAPMAN
' 113 South Main

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FOIR YOUNG MEN
Z4 Perfect Fit For

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Those Warm
Soft
Wool Reefers
We have them
Priced from
1.50 to $6.OO
Tinker& Company
SO. STATE ST. AT WILLIAM ST.
DRESS SUITS FOR RENTAL

.!

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I

TODAY ONLY

Jack

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Real Good Look
and They Last
The style and good loo4
of a miue garment wi
last. Their "good looks
are permanent.. , Carefu
designing -honest han
tailoring account for thic
You'll find no bette
way of getting satisfac
tion and real value thax
by insisting on 'Sgraoiu

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IN

"Th Call of the North"

By STEWART EDWARD WHITE
that reflects the sort of man we all admire. with an
absorbing plot and heart-warming romance.

A story

E leading stores in the
United States have handled
Irw 4ntf for thirty years.

ll

L ASSIFIET HIS
OLUMN EU CUMN
CLOSES CLOSES
AT 3 PM. ADVERTISING AT 3 P.M.

EXTRA COMEDY FEATURE
"SEA SHORE SHAPES"
NEWS ORCHESTRA
FRIDAY - SATURDAY
Katherine MacDonald

Ederheimer Stein Company-Chicago-

San Francisco

New York

Basi

04

WANTED

WANTED-Two tickets for McCormick
concert on first floor or first balcony.
Will exchange two in second bal-
cony and pay liberally. Call Quar-
ry's Drug Store. 45-2
WANTED-Hustler to handle Insur-
ance proposition and agents. Hand-'
some income. Apply Box B. L.
WANTED-Three tickets for the Mill-
npsofa game. Call ampu 92-J,4
rings, .4
WANTED-TPiree seats in the South
Stand for M cinn; t game. Call 101.
45-2
LOST
LOST-Gold Waltham wrist watch on
Wisconsin special, on trip to Madi-
son. -Valued as gift. Reward. Please'
return to P. F. Moore, 620 S. State.
LOST-Parker fountain pen between
Martha Cook and Upper Study Hall,
T,,iaRdA V A _ rCal ,Mav7 Van

LOST
LOST-One fur-lined brown glove.
Call Burket, 2106-R. 46
FOR SALE
FOR SALE-Orpheum No. 1 Tenor
Banjo. Bargain, almost new. Coch
ran, 754-J.6-8
FOR SALE-Tuxedo suit in excellent
condition, sire 34. Call Robbins at
___ 46-2
FOR SALE-Four tickets for Minne-
sota game. Call 1662-W. 46
FOR RENT
FOR RENT - Three office rooms in
Nickel's Arcade. Enquire at room
FOR RENT-Suite and single room
for couple, or girls. 910 E. Washing-
ton St. 46-3
MISCELLANEOUS
TUTORING in Spanish. Ty appoint-
ment $.75 a lesson. Arnold Greene,
120 N. Ingalls. 2854-M. 45-2

I

IN

Your

r

Wife"

it

ASK TO SEE TIE FALL
STYLES INCLUDING THE
S-L-E-N-D-O MODELS AT
Cor ett
116 Last Liberty
Where Fftform Clothes Are 8

COMING SUNDAY

"The Child Thou Sayest Me"

I

THE OUTSTANDING rICTURE OF THE YEAR

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