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November 12, 1921 - Image 12

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-11-12

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PAGE FOUR

THE MICHIGAN

DAILY

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 1921

Jr

Tradition Calls On Seniors To
Cut Initials On Tap-Room Tables)

Seniors, get out your knives and
carve your initials on the tables in the
Union tap room. Cut them deeply that
the knives of later years may not efface
the initials of the men of '22. Such
is the decree of tradition.
"The table-tops are an ideal place
for seniors' names," said Walter B.
Rea, '22, president of the senior lit-.
PROSPECTIVE TEACHERS
MUST PPLY AT ONCE
FEE OF $1 WILL BE CHARGED FOR
REGISTRATION AFTER
MONDAY
Prospective teachers may enroll at
the Bureau of Appointments in room
105, Tappan hall, any time before Mon-
day night, after which a fee of $1 will
be charged for registration.
With an enrollment of 383 teachers
at the bureau so far this year, 342
positions have already been filled.
Calls From Many Places
Calls for teachers have come from
France, Porto Rico, the Phillipine Is-
lands, Canada, and Hawaii. Only 46
per cent of the calls came from the
state of Michigan, the others being di-
vided among 41 other states and for-
eign countries.
For the igh schools English teach-
ers were in greatest demand, with calls
for 182. Mathematics teachers recev-
'Cd 107 calls, Latin teachers 95 calls,
history 33 calls, and 82 calls for French
t eachers.
Administrative openings have not
teen numerous, only 10 calls being re-
(eived for superintendents as compar-
ed with 25 calls last year.
Salaries Advanced
Teachers' salaries have advanced
considerable during the past two years.
In 1919 94 per cent of the women re-
ceiving positions through the bureau
accepted salaries below $1,300. This
year only 8 per cent accepted posi-
tions below that figure, while 46 per
cent received salaries of $1,500 and
above.
Fifty-one per cent of the men ac-
cepted positions paying below $1,800
in 1919. This year only 20 per cent
took positions paying less than that.
Twenty-six per cent of the men appli-
cants this year have secured salaries
of $2,500 and above.
News of the Day
IN BRIEF
Berlin, Nov. 11.-Ratification of the
German-American peace treaty was
exchanged here tonight at the foreign
office between Ellis Loring Bresel, the
American commissioner, and Dr. Karl
Wirth, chancellor and minister of for-
eign affairs. Article three of the peace
treaty with Germany provides that
the treaty "shall take effect immedi-
ately on the exchange of ratification."
Brownsville, Tex., Nov. 11.-A snow
white pigeon flew into Sacred Heart
church here this morning in a service
celebrating Armistice day and perch-
ed over a memorial window and re-
mained throughout the service.
London, Nov. 11.-The Outlook, a
weekly publication, in its issue of to-
day asserted that the Russian Soviet
government had unofficially approach-
ed the United States government with
a view to concluding a Russo-Ameri-
can alliance in opposition to the An-
glo-Japanese alliance. The Soviet

overtures were ignored, the periodi-j
cal said.
Rome, Nov. 11.-Four persons were,
killed and 13 wounded today in dis-
order between the Sascisti and the
railway workmen which arose two
days ago on the eve of the opening
of the Sascisti convention here. Nine
of those wounded in today's disorder
were policemen. As a result of a
general strike the city was still with- I
out newspapers today.

erary class yesterday. "So far this
year there has been little of this done.
It may be some what early yet, but the
boys ought to be starting."
An inspection made yesterday re-
vealed only a few '22 initials on the
tables.
How different are they from the ole
scarred and stained table-tops that
adorn the walls of the Chamber of
Commerce Inn, which was formerly
Joe Parker's rendezvous. The tables
at "Joe's" were utilized by seniors up
to the last square inch of space.
Is this an indication of the decay of
Michigan spirit? Perhaps the seniors
of bygone days wanted to have their
friends know that they were imbibing
other liquids than malted milk or
cocoa-cola when they became thirsty.
Who knows?
FORHPENING OF,,
ARMANENT MEET

SPECIALCARE
300 TO_ MADISO
Full Train of 11 Cars Crowded W.
Michigan Rooters on Way to
Big Game
QUOTA OF 1,000 TICkETS
SOLD BY ATIIlJETIC OI CE
A full train, containing two coaches
and nine sleepers and crowded wi
enthusiastic students on their way to
what promised to be a big Michigan
comeback day, pulled out of the Mich-
igan Central station at 9 o'clock last
night for the special trip to Madison.
k. total of more than '00 men and wo.-
men made the trip, the final figures
being reached by a ticket sate at t e
railroad station that continued stea,-
ily up to the time of departure last
night.
The special arrives in Madison at S
o'clock this morning and will stay un il
10 o'clock tonight, when it will tart
on the return journey. It will go on'
through Chicago, giving stop over priv-
ileges in that city till midnight tomor-
row night, and will arrive here early
Sunday morning.
Michigan will be represented at the
game this afternoon by a crowd of
more than 1,000 rooters, a large num-
ber making the trip to Wisconsin by
automobile or by other routes. Tin'
quota of tickets sent by Wisconsi- at
letic officials to Ann Arbor last we kt
totaling 1,000, was exhausted 'r-
lay and a number of students expect
to purchase tickets at the g toda
The Varsity band, containing more
:han 75 members, left at 8:5) o'clock
yesterday morning on two special
Toaches.

j t 3r , eals iFor work
Although the 1921 football season is I RElD--
slowly vaning many important games -Armin Roemer, '21A, and Horace
appar on today's schedule. Featuring
the eastern games is the annual, tra- Robert Frost will be entertained at Wachter, spec., were recently awarded
ditional Yale-Princeton confab. Yale's a public reception next Tuesday night' medals by the city of Soissons,
ull flog eleven, one of the five unde- in the Union, according to plans an- france, in recognition of their recon-
fet:-d teams in the East, swings into nounced yesterday by the Union re- struction work done in that city this
>>tion this afternoon fully determin- summer. Their work was carried on
ception committee. Invitatins have
c1 to maintain its unsullied record at been sent out to all fraternities and nder the direction of the Princeton
h2 expense of the Tigers. Princeton, house clubs and both facuit memrlbers Reconstruction unit, of which they
,mar , although twice de- and students are invtedl to attend. were both members.
to:l<'d this season, is not to be made This is the first opportunity given Much of the initial work in building
of. The Tigers seemed to be a the student body in general to meet up the French city was the removal
reveated team when they van-h ,s n of debris and the construction of
Ti~med the Crimson of Harvard, last therpoet, whose purpose in bin school house and town halls. Later,
here, according to thie terms of Cha se
ti and are out to further redeem . In wever, the time of the American
&ne ~eh'es in thi-, their final game of rhorn's dontisn, s to come ins
_! hithi inlgaeo contact with the studenits. and faculty 1 acoitects was spent in the building

EATEN CONTESTrS RECPTIO FORFROT
TO A TRACTM MANYI

Students Awarded

t
I
y
1
X
}

Y

LEADING POWERS
PLEDGED TO
TION IN

ARE SOLEMNLY
CO-OPERA-
TASK

WORLD OPINION URGES
PE RMANEN P FRIENDSHIP
Confidence In Success of Negotiations
Is Generally Mani-
fested
(By Associated Press)
Washington, Nov. 11.-With the eyes
of all the world fixed hopefully upon
them, the accredited spokesmen of the
powers will meet in Washington to-
morrow to try to find a way to ease
the heavy burdens of armament.
In the historic quest Great Britain.
France, Italy, Japan and the United
States, a group which acting together
can turn the whole tide of civilization
into new channels, all have pledged a
solemn and determined co-operation.
In addition China, Belgium, Portu-
gal and the Netherlands, invited be-
cause of their vital interest in the
pertinent and crucial problems of the
Far East, will sit in the conference
to complete the circle of those who
are to strive for the new day of in-
ternational relationship.
Good Will Prevails
Outwardtmanifestation of confi-
dence in the success of the negotia-
tions never have been more promi-
nent than on the eve of the assem-
bling of the delegates in formal con-
clave. Every nation is declared by its
leader to be ready to come to the con-
ference table with the spirit of un-
qualified good will or every other, and
behind there is a great urging force
of world opinion seeking translation
into the covenant of permanent friend-
ship.
Among the statesmen and diplomats
of the visiting nations the great topic
of interest tonight was the address
made at Arlington today by Presi-
dent Harding, who summoned the
conference into being, and who will
welcome it to American soil tomor-
row.
Support of America Pledged
Upon every hand was heard expres-
sions of satisfaction that in paying
his tribute to America's soldier dead
the chief executive seized the oppor-
tunity to renew the pledge of the
United States to take its full share
of leadership in the attainment of a
better order.
In the fulfillment of that pledge it
is the expectation of all the dele-
gates that the American government
will place before the conference as
soon as it begins its work a concrete
proposal for armament limitation.
Such a proposal has been prepared by
the American delegates, and there
seems to be universal agreement that
as the initiator of the negotiation the
United States should have the first
say. Whether the proposal will be
submitted tomorrow, however, is a
question which present indications
would answer in the negative.
iIEETING TO DISCUSS PLAY
BUSINESS FOR JUNIOR GIRLS
For the purpose of discussing busi-
ness concerning the Junior Girls' play
there will be a meeting of all women
of the junior class at 4 o'clock Tues-
day in the league rooms at Barbour
gymnasium. It is especially Import-
ant that those interested in trying out
for the play be present to register and
classify for parts. Prof. John L. Brummn
will speak at this time and a sketch of
the play may be given.

e W'r. A bittr struggle is predict-
cd, w1h Yale slightly favored. How-
er, in ibe last analysis, victory will1
c'it iii the asserted superiority of
oei ier the dogged grit of the Yale Bull
Dog or the fighting spirit of the Tig-'
ers.
uvy, conqueror of Princeton and
ano l'er of the five undefeated teams
r toe Atlantic seaboard, tackles a
t.rh eppenent in Penn State. Bez-
d(K5 uroteges have won all of their
'nnes save one, which ended in a 21-
21 tie with harvard and should give
the Middies a real battle this after-
Cornell, the fourth member of the
group of the undefeated five, should
ounter little trouble with the
Smc ,cld eleven in their game this
rn ton. Cornell's record this sea-
o quite enviable and its scoring
hMe should he greatly evidenced
piy against the weaker Springfield;
afyete, Pittsburgh's early season
ouror and the last of the undefeat-t
d five, vill also be pitted against a
,eat opponent in the guise of the
Delaware eleven.
,TE< E" °T1 E FE SHOW
NT FI) THEATER DESERTED
hen someone in the crowd return-
- from the send-off for the football
team. Thursday night shouted "free
chow," the deserted Arcade theater be-
~wac the scene of an impromptu pep
w cing. Several hundred students
forced their way in to the lobby of the
e er only to find the interior of the
place dark and deserted. Wild whoops
id cheers and much turning on of
ihts attracted the attention of a
o'ssing noheenman who soon succeed-
d in ci'ering the lobby.

-

in an unofficial capacity, After meet-
ing all students and faculty who at-
tend the gathering, Frost ill give a
short informal talk.
The reception committee, which has
arranged the affair, is composed of
James G. Frey, '22, chairman; Jamesl
Hume, '23, assistant chairman; David
Beers. '22, George I. Murphy, '22L,

of eaygrounds and other public util-
A : ny of the architects remained in
France this winter for study and re-
construction work.
FACT'IY SERVICE MEN
HOLD BANQUET IN UNION

)

SE~NOR N()TI{ir

Only 6 days left to have your
'Ensian pictures take,. No ex.
tension of time can be grauted.
Organization pictures only are
to be taken during the month of
January.

Burton Dunlop, '23, Max Schrayer, Faculty men who served during the
'23E, Samuel Ginsberg, '23, Victor war met last night in the Union at
Method, '23, Clifford Stuart; '22, Paul their second annual banquet given in
Goebel, '23E, and Frank Tennent, '23. honor of Armistice day. Col. Harry
G e e , '3 , a d F a k T n e t '2 W . M iller, professor of stereotom y,
spoke on "German Coast Defenses".
\Iarcel Clavel, instructor in romance
Mrs. Barbara 11. Bartlett, professor i languages and formerly a captain in
of public health nursing at the Iui- the French army, and Prof. Joseph
versity will leave Sunday, November 13 R. Hayden, of the political science de-
to attend the 15th American Public' pamtment, also spoke.
Health association meeting,. Nov. 15 to -
18, in New York City. Patronize Daily Advertisers.-Adv.
: 11K i1111t ix li tim ilii 3 i i111 tp 11 11111111111111111 1 i:
SPECIAL DISCOUNT ON
PERSONAL
CHRISTMAS GREETING CARD r
w ORDERS RECEIVED BEFORE NOV. 20TH
- -
CH RISTMAS BOX STATIONERY
ON DISPLAY
A DEPOSIT WILL HOLD UNTIL DEC. 10TH
S)MORRIIL
17 NICKElS ARCADE
-
of
.eQUAITYS
SShp
BluMai PH-%sNE

1p

Episcopal girls-we are having a
'ake sale today at Harris Hflll. Come
mnd bring your friends.--Adv.
Try a Daily Want Ad. It pays.-Adv.

i

W. hen

Yo U;

now

What Is Bet.Ak
for it bym
By J. R. HAMILTON
Former Advertising Manager of Wanamaker's, Philadelphia
If a man has anything he is proud of, he gives it a name
whether it be a baby or a pair of boots. And the more he is proud
of it, the more he talks about it.
Nameless things are seldom good and never reliable. If you
want to cut down your cost of living the very best way to do it is
to learn to ask only for standard articles.
When you know the name of a good maker of shirts or shoes,
of furniture or pianos, of hardware or underwear, fix that name
definitely in your mind and remember it when you come to buy.
Do not allow strange things to come into your home any
more than you would allow strange people.
The brand and the trade-mark and the copyright are the let-
ters of introduction from the maker to you. In this way he
vouches for their respectability and guarantees their good be-
havior in your home.
There is a name for every good product that is made, And
most of these names are known to every man and woman in
America. Manufacturers have spent hundreds of millions of dol-
lars to standardize these names in your mind. From the lining
of a dress to a laundry soap; from a cleanser to a baking powder;
from a suit of clothes to a kit of tools; you could call every stand.
ard article on the market by name if you would only remember
to do so when you come to buy.
It is through your carelessness that lies and adulterations
creep in. The standard is set by good men, but the standard is
only maintained by you.
It is time for you to forget the generic name of every article,
and remember only the standard name of its quality.
In the advertising news of this paper today you will find
many of these standard names and brands of quality. This article
is written for the sole purpose of rmainding you to use those
names. It is only fair that you should do as much for these good
manufacturers as they are doing for you. It is only right that
you should help in this great standardization of good products
that is going on throughout America.

213 E. Liberty,
Member of

Incorporated
Nickels Arcade
Florists' Telegram Delivery

PlIg hilil I 11111 1 III I

LAMM TAILORED

CLOTHES-FOR MEN OF TASTE & JUDGMENT

More Wear Per Dollar

It's not
but the

what' you pay in dollars and cents
clothes mileage you get per dollar

L/AMM HAND TAILORED
SUIT OR OVERCOAT

..,,-.
.......

WHAT'S GOING ON

FASHIONS GALORE
HUNDREDS OFf
FABRICS

$4

TAILORED FOR YOU
NOT
READY MADE

SATURDAY,
7 :45-Craftsmen club meets at Masonic
temple.
SUNDAY
10:80-Rev. John McCormick, bishop
of western Michigan, speaks at St.
Andrew's church.
4:15-Faculty concert in Hill auditor-
ium.
6:00-Rev. John M. McCormick speaks

Complete Satisfaction or Money Back
"OUR OWET MADE IN ANN ARBOR"
FRG 3 0TO $70
J. KARL MALCOLM
604 East Liberty Street

Begin now to ask by name for everything you buy.
will find your satisfaction growing greater day by day
optimism extending even down to your pocketbook.
(Copyrighted.)

And you
and your

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