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November 12, 1921 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-11-12

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PAGWI TWO THE MICHIGAN DAILY SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 1921

4S6,
OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY
OF MICHiGAN
Put'lished every nmwllnig except Monday during tle Univer-
sity year by the Board Cutr0l f Sudent Pubia{ trns.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associatcd Press is exclusively entitled to the use for!
republicationsof allc news dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
credited in this paper and the local news published therein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
class matter.j
Suoscription by carrier or mail, $3.50.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press building, Maynard Street.
Phones: Business, g6o; l'.ditorial, 2414.
Communications not to eccced0 odoif sined, the sig-
nature not necessarily to appear in print, bu taa ?ince of
faith, and notices of eventrs ill b)e pulisth. d in T1I it at tihe
discretion of the litor, if left at ort aied t h I)ai~y -ice.
Unsigned comunnieations will mrceive no c:sid r'.;i No man-
uscript will be reto ried n the wi ittil pa
The Daily dtonnesssriy ndrs te citiiit- ex-
pressed in the comrnuntcalrions.
EDITORJ AL STAFF
Teleplioe 2414
MANAGING EDITOR........... BREWSTER P. CAMPBPLL
Assistant Managing Editor.............,..Hugh W. Ilitchcock
City Editor ................. ................E. P. Lovejoy, Jr.
Night Editors-
R E 9. Adams G. P. Overton
Edward Labrecht M. 11. Stahl
Hugnston Mellain Paul Watzel
editorial Board Chairman.........................T. J. Whinery
Assistants-
S. T. Beach E. R. Meiss
L. A. Kern Leo llersbdorfer
Sunday Magazine Editor................Thornton W. Sargent, Jr.
exchange Editor.................................George 1?. Sloan
Music Editor..................................Sidney B. Coates
Sporting Editor ................................ George Reindel
Women's Editor ............................,E1lizabeth Vickery
Humor Editor....................................t EI. Meiss
Assistants
R. N. Byers L. L. Fenwick B. H4. Lee
W. B. Butler H. B. Grundy J. 1.,Mack
A. D. Clark Agnes ulimtist Kathrine Montgomery
Harry C. Clark H. E. Howlectt R. C. Moriarity
. P. Comstock Marion Kerr R. B. Tarr
John P. Dawson L. S. Kerr Virginia Tryon
H. A. Donahue l. A. Klaver Dorothy Whipple
W. F. Elliott Marion Koch L. L. Yost

J. B. Young

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
BUSINESS MANAGER...... ....VERNON F. HILLERY
Advertising.......................... M. Heath, A. J. Parker
Pablication...............................Nathan W. Robertson
Accounts .................................. Jolin J. Hiamels, Jr.
Circulation........... ...................lierohl C. duiint
Assistants
Burr L. Robbins Richard Cutting II. Willis Heidbreder
W. Cooley Janmes Prentiss W. Kenneth Galbraith
L. Beaumont Parks Maurice Moule J. A. Dryer
Walter Scherer Maitin Goldring Richard Heidemann
Edw. Murane Tyler Stevens T. 11 Wolfe
David Park Paul Blum
S R.
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 1921

ATTEND THAT SMOKER
To those who left last night for Madison for the
Michigan-Wisconsin game, the week end will be one
full of excitement and interest. But, although it
is certain that every member of the student body
would have desired to make the trip to Wisconsin,
only a small percentage went, and the majority
now find themselves in Ann Arbor with no event
of special interest except the report of the game as
it comes over the telegraph wires. Just like an
oasis on the desert, there looms up a most pleas-
ing sign of relief in the form of the smoker which
is being given this afternoon under the auspices of
the Detroit Alumni association of the University.
These smokers have always been well attended by
students from Ann Arbor in previous years, and
their success as pep-instilling mediums and as sub-
stitutes for actual presence at the scene of the
game has been evidenced by their continued rise in
popularity. The smoker today will in every way
resemble a mimature mass meeting, with cheer lead-
ers and entertainers, and the additional features of
smokes and drinks (a la Volstead, of course), and
play-by-play reports of the game, which will be re-
ceived on a leased wire direct from the scene of ac-
tion at Madison.
The alumni have extended a general invitation to
the student body to attend, and surely no better
way of getting the reports of the game and at the
same time adding some spice to a rather unevent-
ful week-end than this could be suggested. There'll
be pep from the time the doors open until the final
staccato clicks of the telegraph announce the Wol-
verine victory over the Cardinals, and the smoker
will afford a great opportunity for undergraduates
to observe how alumni can celebrate when they
have sufficient cause.
ART - FOR WHOSE SAKE?
Chicago is a city which is noted for its windy
atmosphere, its resemblance to New York, and its
art exhibits. The first of these distinguishing marks
concerns only the residents of the city, while the
latter two are often of interest in the various parts
of the United States. At least, a certain event oc-
curred there last week which has caused Chicago's
city sisters and cousin villages sufficient food for
thought, and probably either some cause for laugh-
ter or more cause for chagrin.
Last week, Chicago held its annual art exhibit, on
which occasion connoisseurs and lovers of art jour-
neyed from distant points to view the creations of
master painters. Many of those paintings on exhi-
bition were genuine art, too, for the event was ac-
claimed a pronounced success by impartial critics
and unpartisan judges. That is - it was a success
from all angles but one, and that one a rather se-
rious hindrance to the purpose of the exhibition.
Society buds, "debs", staid matrons, and ambitious
mothers with children of prospective marriageable
age, cluttered up the hallways and salons of the in-
stitute, hindering those who were present for the
purpose of viewing the exhibit. Mencken would
probably call these light minded, tea-drinking, cake-
eating, individuals nincompoops, and there is little
doubt that the appellation would be fully deserved.
The home is the place for tea-pouring parties,
and for the arrangement of marriage pacts surely
a cozy parlor, an enclosed automobile, or a bench
in the park are more suitable than an art exhibit for
securing the desired results. Europe would mock
America as young, indifferent, and incapable of se-
riously appreciating art, should the tale of the Chi-
cago institute be told across the Atlantic. The ac-
cusation we on this side of the ocean could deny
as untrue, but unless many of our well-meaning,
but unthinking citizens (of both sexes) realize that
an art exhibit is not merely an excuse for a purely
frivolous social gathering. Europe may, after all,
be justified in reaching such a conclusion.

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DETROIT UNITED l.INES
Ann Arbor and Jackson
TIME TABLE
(l a'..ei n tanda. rd 'Time)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars-6.os a.
;:05 a., : tao a. a . and hourly to :xo
1). in.
Jackson Express Cars (local stops of Ann
Arbor) 9:48 a. in. and every two hours to
9:48 P. in
Local Cars East Bound-5 :55 a.m., 7 :00 a.
m. and every two hours to 9 :oo p. in., r r :00
pi . m.1o Ypsilanti only -11 :40 p. M-~12-25
a. mn., ri:i 5a . n
To Saline, change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars West Bound-7:50 a. in., 2:40 p.
m.
To Jackson and Kalamazoo-Lirnited cars:
8:48, 1o:48 a. m., 12:48, 2:48, 4:48.
To Jackson and Lansng-Limited: 8:48
p). mf.

Patronize our Advertisers.--Adv.
Daily Want Ada Pay.-Adv.

Try a Daily Want Ad. It pays.-Adv.
Patronize Daily Advertisers.-Adv.

1921
6
13
20
27

NOVEMBER
1 2 3
7 8 9 10
14 15 16 17
21 22 23 24
28 29 30

4
11
18
25

1921
b
12
19
26

NOTICE TO EV
We do all kind, of high-class Hat
work at pre-war prices. Hats turned
inside out, with all new trininlgs,
are as good as new.
FACTORY HAT STORE
f17 iPAVARI) STREET
Telephone 1792
SHUBERT Twice Daily
S CHICAN Matinee5 0e to $1.-o
1 (DETROIT) Nights - 5oc to $2.oo
The greatest screen spectacle
the world has ever known,
The history of the world has been written in
love stories and this is one.
GA R I CK Ni"hts-w50C t*$5*0
Et+# T Mat. Wcd.& Sat oc to $-5o
DETROIT a
The thrill of romance, the sunshine of
laughter, the joy of music.
-- Up in the Clouds --
THE YOUTHFUL BEAUTY CHORUS.

Exclusivre Designing
-"-
Afternoon and Lbening
at 230 Nickels Arcade
- 'ici. 795-W=
Many peope are having their diamonds re-set from tile old-fashioned
Weresowin woderful collection of designs, both in Plat-
inum, and 18 K. White Gold, all hand-made and Guaranteed to keep
their color.
STile p)rices are very Moderate as usual with us. .Platinum Rings
of ilandlsome design, basket setting for $35, including the setting of
stone.
18 K. gold ones from $10 to $25 including the setting -of the dia-
mond. . And remember WE pay tile WAR-T AX.
ARNOLD & CO., JEWELERS
MAIN STREET
"GIFTS THAT LAST"

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Log Log Slide Rules
AT
GRAHAM'S
Both ends of the diagonal !Walk

4

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THE CRUCIAL TEST
Today there face each other on the field of bat-
tle two of the strongest teams in the Western
Conference, Michigan and Wisconsin, on the lat-
ter's own field. Michigan has primed herself dur-
ing the past two weeks for this encounter, for it
was with a full realization of the power of the op-
ponents and the importance of this contest that
Coach Yost set to work to prepare for today's
game. It is without exaggeration the crucial test
of the year for Michigan, and by far the hardest
struggle of the entire schedule.
Here in Ann Arbor, and all over the country,
wherever Michigan alumni or supporters are to be
found, excitement is at a high pitch as the time
for the battle draws near, and the result remains
but a few hours' distant. Everyone is pulling, and
pulling strong, for a Michigan victory. Sit tight,
pray for victory, and cheer the team. LET'S GO.!
HAMMERING ALONE
The eye of one standing at a distance from a
man striking a building sees the blow before the
noise from it is communicated to the ear. It takes
but a slight stretch of the imagination to conceive of
a situation in which the ear may be detecting the
noise though the workman may be seen to have
ceased hammering, in which case one wishing to
act in unison with the worker would be entirely
misled if he relied only on the sound that reached
him.
Something very similar to this has happened in
the passing of the recent resolution calling for the
removal of Coach Yost, at the recent meeting of
the Grand Rapids Alumni association. The action of
these graduates was taken at a time when all the ex-
cess steam arising after the Ohio game had been
dissipated as far as the Michiganstudent body was
concerned and the sane conclusion had been reached
that the time to raise the coaching question, if at
all, was after the season was over. When the step
was taken Michigan had come back in the Illinois
game and was bending all her forces, including the
spirit that has turned the tide in her favor in many
doubtful contests, toward a victory at Madison.
The whole undergraduate body was dominated by
one idea - beat Wisconsin!
With these as the circumstances, the Grand Rap-
ids men's move was worse than impulsively taking
part in agitation that would indirectly, but none the
less certainly, cut down our chances in the remain,
ing games of the season. It amounted to an at-
tempt to revive bodily a demoralizing issue already
buried. Fortunately this unthinking and ill-advised
action was immediately scored by other alumni in
the Valley City and by Detroit graduates. Even if
the resolution could be excused as an effort to as-
sist the man with the hammer, it can't be excused
when as a fact he had thought better and stopped
work before the assistance was tendered.

Packard Academy tonight.
ing. $1.40.-Adv.

Dane-

E 4

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WORLD FAMOUS
INTUMECHS
Choose the Instrument
That Suits YouR
Talent
OU find it here-individual instru-
Inents, or complete outfits for
everything from the smallest jazz
orchestra to the military band.

.. .. .... "'y='}

}

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The Telescope

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Business Is Business
Most people you will find in life
Possess a different style,
The druggist, asked how business is,
Will most times answer, "Vial."
The clean-up man who for his job
Draws very little pay,
Will answer with a cheery smile,
"It's picking up, today."
Magicians are inclined to boast,
And if one ever blunders
To ask them just how business is,
It's always "Doing wonders."
Dear Erm: Just wanted to let you know that
while I was at an Oklahoma hotel this summer a.
young fellow, evidently much under the weather,
came in and signed up as General Breeze, from
All-Outdoors. - Ges Who.
Quoth Eppie Taff:
Word from the grave which we received
Has dashed our every hope,
It said, "I died of ennui,
From too much Telescope."
The Rock ofAges
P'rofessor: What benefits are derived from the
Frosh: Well, we can keep the furnace in the
basement instead of the attic, sir. --
-- Cicero.
Famous Closing Lines
"Take your base," yelled the crowd as the quar-
tette left one of their number on the stage.
ERM.

C. G. Conn Instruments
Acknowledged Superior
by the World's Greatest Artists

[1

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way, Innes, Kryl, Creatore, Liberati, U. S.
Marine Band, the greatest opera and sym-
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Scientifically built in the world's largest
band instrument factory. All taper branches
expanded by hydraulic pressure, an exclu-
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and a smooth interior, a perfect carriage
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A Complete Line Here,:
Cornets French Horns
Trombones Euphoniuma
Altos Basses
MelophonesC.aincv

Including
Wood Flutes
Metal Flutes
Piccolos
Drums

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linirt3erSUB mush anon
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