100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 12, 1921 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-11-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

t

ILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

Volume 2

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 1921

Number 42

Phillips Scholarship Examinations:
Examinations for the Phillips Scholarships will be held as follows Sat-
urday, Nov. 12: Latin, at 9 o'clock, and Greek at 2 o'clock, both in room
108 Tappan Hall.
A. R. CRITTENDEN,
F. E. ROBBINS,
Committee in Charge.
Students from Foreign Lands:
Some of the ladies in Lansing, Michigan, are willing to entertain stu-
dents from foreign countries at their homes during the Christmas holidays.
Women who are interested will please consult Dean Jordan at her office
hours. Men will. please consult with me, Thursdays and Fridays at 4
o'clock, 302 University Hall; phone 1451, or University exchange 110-J.
J. A. C. HILDNER,
Adviser to Foreign Students.
Faculty Twilight Recital:
The University Symphony Orchestra, Samuel Pierson Lockwood, Con-
ductor; Marian Struble. Violinist, will render the following program in Hill
Auditorium, Sunday afternoon, at 4:15 o'clock. The concert will begin on
time and all patrons are requested to be seated promptly since the doors
will be closed during numbers. No admission charge. Overture to "Der
Schauspieldirektor" (Mozart); Concerto, D minor (Wieniawski); Two Mel-
odies, Op. 53, for Strings (Grieg); Symphony, D major, op. 36 (Beethoven).
CHARLES A. SINK, Secretary.
Tradition Calls On Seniors To
Cut Initials On Tap-Room Tables

SPECIALCARE
300 TO MADISON~
Full Train of 11 Cars Crowded With a
Michigan Rooters on Way to
Big Game
QUOTA OF 1,000 TICKETS
SOLD BY ATHLETIC OFFICE;
A full train, containing two coaches
and nine sleepers and crowded with
enthusiastic students on their way to
what promised to be a big Michigan
comeback day, pulled out of the Mich-
igan Central station at 9 'o'clock last
night for the special trip to Madison.
A total of more than 300 men and wo-
men made the trip, the final figures
being reached by a ticket sale at the
railroad station that continued stead-
ily up to the time of departure last
night.
The special arrives in Madison at 8
o'clock this morning and will stay until
10 o'clock tonight, when it will start
on the return journey. It will go on
through Chicago, giving stop over priv-
ileges in that city till midnight tomor-
row night, and will arrive here early
Sunday morning.
Michigan will be represented at the
game this afternoon by a crowd of
more than 1,000 rooters, a large num-
her making the trip to Wisconsin by
automobile or by other routes. The
quota of tickets sent by Wisconsin ath-
letic officials to Ann Arbor last week,
totaling 1,000, was exhausted Fri-
day and a number of students expect
to purchase tickets at the gate today.
The Varsity band, containing more
than 75 members, left at 8:50 o'clock
yesterday morning on two special
coaches.
SENIOR NOTICE
Only 6 days left to have your
'Ensian pictures taken. No ex-
tension of time can be granted.
Organization pictures only. are
to be taken during the month of
January.
Episcopal girls-we are having a
bake sale today at Harris Hall. Come
and bring your friends.-Adv.
Try a Daily Want Ad. It pays.-Adv..

Dormitory Gives
Overseas Prty
"Back in a canteen in France for
the afternoon" was the thought up-
permost in the minds of overseas men
and women who attended the annual
Armistice day party held at Betsy
Barbour dormitory yesterday.-
Divisional insignia, signs of "Com-
plet", "Have you written that letter
home?" and recruiting posters were
reminiscent of army life. M. P.'s, not
the severe army kind this time, were
on duly to clear the da.ncing floor
when the waiting list became too
long.
A "chow line' 'and a beer garden
where cider was served were popu-
lar features. Miss Eleanor Sheldon,
in a Y. M. C. A. uniform, was hostess
to the guests. Miss Sheldon was
overseas with the American forces.
EASTERN' CONTESTS WILL
ATTRACT LARGE CROWDS
(Contiued from Page Four)
the Middies a real battle this after-
noon.
-Cornell, the fourth member of the
group of the undefeated five, should
encounter little trouble with the
Springfield eleven in their game this
afternoon.Cornell's record this sea-
son is quite enviable and Its scoring
machine should be greatly evidenced
in play against the weaker Springfield
eleven.
Lafayette, Pittsburgh's early season
conqueror and the last of the undefeat-
ed five, will also be pitted against a
weak opponent in the guise of the
Delaware eleven. Lafayette should
win handily.
STUDENTS SEEK FREE SHOW
BUT FIND THEATER DESERTED
When someone in the crowd return-
ing from the send-off for the football
team, Thursday night shouted "free
show," the deserted Arcade theater be-
came the scene of an impromptu pep
meeting. Several hundred students
forced their way in to the lobby of the
theater only to find the interior of the
place dark and deserted. Wild whoops
and cheers and much turning on of
ights attracted the attention of a
passing policeman who soon succeed-
ed in clearing the lobby.
There was $550.63 in the athletic
treasury in 1892. Four hundred of it
was used to improve the athletic field.

RECEPTION FOR FROST
IS 1 ARRINED BY UNION'

Robert Frost will be
a public reception next

entertained at
Tuesday night

in the Union, according to plans an-
nounced yesterday by the Union re-
ception committee. Invitations have
been sent out to all fraternities and
house clubs, and both faculty members
and students are invited to attend.
This is the first opportunity given
the student body in general to meet
the poet, whose purpose in being
here, according to the terms of Chase
S. Orborn's donation, is to come in
contact with the students and faculty
in an unofficial capacity. After meet-
ing all students and faculty who at-
tend the gathering, Frost will give a
short informal talk.
The reception committee, which has
arranged the affair, is composed of
James G. Frey, '22, chairman; James
Hume, '23, assistant chairman; David
Beers, '22, George I. Murphy, '22L,
Burton Dunlop, '23, Max Schrayer,
'23E, Samuel Ginsberg, '23, Victor
Method, '23, Clifford Stuart, '22, Paul
Goebel, '23E, and Frank Tennent, '23.
Prof. Bartlett to Attend Convention
Mrs. Barbara H. Bartlett, professor
of public health nursing at the Uni-
versity will leave Sunday, November 13
to attend the 15th American Public
Health association meeting, Nov. 15 to
18, in New York City.

Students Awarded
Medals For Work
Armin Roemer, '21A, and Horace
Wachter, spec., were recently awarded
medals by the city of Soissons,
France, in recognition of their recon-
struction work done in that city this
summer. Their work was carried on
under the direction of the Princeton
Reconstruction unit, of which they
were both members.
Much of the initial work in building
up the French city was the removal
of debris and the construction of
school house and town halls. Later,
however, the time of the American
architects was spent in the building
of playgrounds and other public util-
ities.
Many of the architects remained in
France this winter for study and re-
construction work.
FACULTY SERVICE MEN
HOLD BANQUET IN UNION
Faculty men who served during the
war met last night in the Union at
their second annual banquet given in
honor of Armistice day. Col. Harry
W. Miller, professor of stereotomy,
spoke on "German Coast Defenses".
Marcel Clavel, instructor in romance
languages and formerly a captain in
the French army, and Prof. Joseph
R. Hayden, of the political science de-
partment, also spoke.
Patronize Daily Advertisers.-Adv.

_'

Seniors, get out your knives and
carve your initials on the tables in the
Union tap room. Cut them deeply that
the knives of later years may not efface
the initials of the men of '22r Such
is the decree of tradition.
"The table-tops are an ideal place
for seniors' names," said Walter B.
Rea, '22, president of the senior lit-

WHAT'S GOING ON

SATURDAY
10:00-Annual freshman cross country
race starts from Volland and Wash-
tenaw streets.
11:00-Annual Harpham trophy race
starts from Ferry field club house.
2:00-Former Battle Creek high school
students meet at Wines field for Bat-
tle Creek-Ann Arbor high school
game.%
7:45-Craftsmen club meets at Masonie
temple.
SUNDAY
10:30-Rev. John McCormick, bishop
of ┬░western Michigan, speaks at St.
Andrew's church.
4 15-Faculty concert in Hill auditor-
ium.
S:00-Rev. Joln 31. McCormick speaks
to Episcopal students in Harris hall.
IMRRESSIVE PARADE MARKS
ARMISTICE DAY CELEBRATION
(Continued from Page One)
And the faces of the boys marching
in ranks appeared a little set. They,
too, had not forgotten. But there was
a spring in their step - the old "who
said we couldn't fight" expression on
their faces - as they once more
moved forward in military formation.
35 Groups Represented
MaJ. Robert Arthur, grand marshal,
accompanied by two aides, led the pa-
rade. More than 35 civic and mili-
tary groups were represented in the
line that followed. Soldiers, sailors,
marines, veterans of foreign wars, R.
0. T. C., Masons, labor organizations,
and boy scouts, all had their places.
Many attractive and artistic floats
were entered in the pageant. Among
the best were those of the Red Cross,
the Odd Fellows, the Veterans of For-
eign Wars, and the Craftsmen club.
The parade started at 2 o'clock
from Huron street, moved down Main
to Packard street, down Packard to
State street, and up State street to
North University and then to Hill
auditorium. '
THOUGHT OF WAR BRINGS
SOMBRE MEMORIES BACK
(Continued from Page One)
ing, and theofficerson horses, with
crowds six deep, along the side, there
was silence.
Thrill of Khaki Fails
Three years ago delirium, a wild,
Insane ecstacy of uncontrolled joy
had met the celebrators. Yesterday it
was a group that appreciated, but had
no heart for celebrating - war. Even
the thrill of a khaki uniform was sup-
pressed.
- People turned from the parade, ap-
preciative, feeling suddenly a chill
in the atmosphere, and they wanted -
to go home, to be alone for awhile.
The blood red poppies, worn over
the heart, had been too symbolic.
Patronize Daily Advertisers.-Adv.

erary class yesterday. "So far this
year there has been little of this done.
It may be some what early yet, but the
boys ought to be starting."
An inspection made yesterday re-
vealed only a few '22 initials on the
tables.',
How different are they from the old
scarred and stained table-tops that
adorn the walls of the Chamber of
Commerce Inn, which was formerly
Joe Parker's rendezvous. The tables
at "Joe's" were utilized by seniors up
to the last square inch of space.
Is this an indication of the decay of
Michigan spirit? Perhaps the seniors
of bygone days wanted to have their
friends know that they were imbibing
other liquids than malted milk or
cocoa-cola when they became thirsty.
Who knows?
News of the Day
IN BRIEF
Berlin, Nov. 11.-Ratification of the
German-American peace treaty was
exchanged here tonight at the foreign
office between Ellis Loring Bresel, the
American commissioner, and Dr. Karl
Wirth, chancellor and minister of for-
eign affairs. Article three of the peace
treaty with Germany provides that
the treaty "shall take effect immedi-
ately on the exchange of ratification."
Brownsville, Tex., Nov. 11.-A snow
white pigeon flew into Sacred Heart
church here this morning in a service
celebrating Armistice day and perch-
ed over a memorial window and re-
mained throughout the service.
London, Nov. 11.-The Outlook, a
weekly publication, in its issue of to-
day 'asserted that the Russian Soviet
government had unofficially approach-
ed the United States government with
a view to concluding a Russo-Ameri-
can alliance in opposition to the An-
glo-Japanese alliance. The Soviet
overtures were ignored, the periodi-
cal said.
Rome, Nov. 11.-Four persons were
killed and 13 wounded today in dis-
order between the Sascisti and the
railway workmen which arose two
days ago on the eve of the opening
of the Sascisti convention here. Nine
of those wounded in today's disorder
were policemen. As a result of a
general strike the city was still with-
out newspapers today.
PHILLIPS' SCHOLARSHIP
EXAMS WILL BE HELD TODAY
Examinations, will be held today
for the Phillips' scholarship in classi-
cal languages. This' prize of $M0 is
awarded annually to thehighest stu-
dent in a competitive examination in
Latin and Greek. Five students have
entered the competition for this schol-
arship, and they will take an examina-
tion in Latin this morning and in
Greek this afternoon.
Dr. Stalker Speaks in Ypsilanti
Dr. A. W. Stalker, pastor of the
Methodist church, gave the Armistice
day address at the First Methodist
church in Ypsilanti yesterdaymorn-
ing. He was invited to make the ad-
dress by the Ypsilanti Board of Com-
merce.
Patronize our Advertisers.-Adv.

When

You

Know

t l llltlittltililll1lillilliillill lllli 1t111i !!il I ti li tl l1 t1I1111111
SPECIAL DISCOUNT ON
PERSONAL
CHRISTMAS GREETING CARD
ORDERS RECEIVED BEFORE NOV. 20TH
j CHRISTMAS BOX STATIONERY
ON DISPLAY
r A DEPOSIT WILL HOLD UNTIL DEC. 1&TH
O. D. MORRILL
17 NICKELS ARCADE
F O U R F L O WE RS'l111ltitlltlilllitti1l!!!!t1litttl 111i! !lliN lli t t I l l i lI1 '!of
SUPERIOR QUALITY
PHONE
Blu Maize Blossom Shop
Incorporated
213 E. Liberty Nickels Arcade
Member of Florists' Telegram Delivery

I

4

4

4

What s Best, s
for it by Name
By J. R. HAMILTON
Former Advertising Manager of Wanamaker's, Philadelphia
If a man has anything he is proud of, he gives it a name
whether it be a baby or a pair of boots. And the more he is proud
of it, the more he talks about it.
Nameless things are seldom good and never reliable. If you
want to cut down your cost of living the very best way to do it is
to learn to ask only for standard articles.
When you know the name of a good maker of shirts or shoes,
of furniture or pianos, of hardware or underwear, fix that name.
definitely in your mind and remember it when you come to buy.
Do not allow strange things to come into your home any
more than you would allow strange people.
The brand and the trade-mark and the copyright are the let-
ters of introduction from the maker to you. In this way he
vouches for their respectability and guarantees their good be-
havior in your home.
There is a name for every good product that is made. And
most of these names arfe known to every man and woman in
America. Manufacturers have spent hundreds of millions of dol-
lars to standardize these names in your mind. From the lining
of a dress to a laundry soap; from a cleanser to a baking powder;
from a suit of clothes to a kit of tools; you could call every stand-
ard article on the market by name if you would only remember
to do so when you come to buy.
It is through your carelessness that lies and adulterations
creep in. The standard is set by good men, but the standard is
only maintained by you.
It is time for you to forget the generic name of every article,
and remember only the standard name of its quality.
In the advertising news of this paper today you will find
many of these standard names and brands of quality. This article
is written for the sole purpose of remainding you to use those
names. It is only fair that you should do as much for these good
manufacturers as they are doing for you. It is only right that
you should help in this great standardization of good products
that is going on throughout America.
Begin now to ask by name for everything you buy. And you
will find your satisfaction growing greater day by day and your
optimism extending even down to your pocketbook.
(Copyrighted.)

I

A

LAMM TAILORED

CLOTHES-FOR MEN OF TASTE & JUDGMENT

More Wear Per Dollar
It's not what you pay in dollars and cents
but the clothes mileage you get per dollar
LAMM HAND TAILORED
SUIT OR OVERCOAT

FASHIONS GALORE
HUNDREDS OF
FABRICS

$45

TAILORED FOR YOU
NOT
READY MADE

Complete Satisfaction or Money Back
"OUR OWN TAILORING MADE IN ANN ARBOR"
FROM $50 TO $70
J. KARL MALCOLM

604 East Liberty Street

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan