100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 12, 1921 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-11-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I THEW

EATHER
D COLDER
DAY

t tl

atig

ASSOCIATI
PRESS
D1Y AD NIGHT
SERTICE

FAIR AN
TO

VOL. XXII. No. 42 ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 1921 PRICE FIVE CJ

MPRESSIE PARADE OF VEER ANS
AND PATRIOTIC CEREMONIES MARK
ANlNIVERSARY Of ARMISTICE DAY

Sadness And Memories Prevail
As Thoughts Of War Return,

MIGHIGAN FOOTBALL SQUAD HOLDS
FlNAL WORKOUT IN PREPARATION
I, FOR TODAY'S GAME WITH BADGEF

CAPACITY CROWD FILLS HILL AU-
DITORIUM FOR SPECIAL h4
PROGRAM a
UNIF ORMS AND FLOATS t
ADD COLOR TO MATCH d
I
Limited Disarmament Advocated By r
President Burton in Address t
At Services s1
- 1
Armistice day was fittingly observed
Friday afternoon In Hill auditorium. r
A capacity crowd filled the big audi-
torium to the doors, and the crowd YE
was there in the spirit of the day. The I
festal mood that on rare occasions pos- ii
sesses entire bodies of people was man- s'
Ifest, but with it was mingled a sense s'
of the sacredness of the day, with a V
full realization of its importarce in o
world annals. It was more than a na-
tional occasion-it was international,
world-wide in its scope, and the crowd
felt It.
Audience Sings National Anthem
Immediately following an organ pre-
lude by Earl V. Moore, University or-
ganist, assembly was sounded by Mrs.
Anna Berger Lynch, of Jackson. "The t;
Star Spangled Banner" was sung by d
the audience, and Rev. Sidney S. Rob- t
ins delivered the invocation. George s
Oscar Bowen, of the School of Music,
led a series of popular war songs, withn
Frank L. Thomas, of the School ofa
Music, as accompanist.
A most significant part of the pro-x
gram was the flag salute by men ofl
many nationalities, members of the
Perry school night classes in Ameri-
canization. These-men are soon to be-
come naturalized, and as they gaveT
their spirited salute, a group of other
men, occupying front seats, arose also
and stood at salute. The second groupl
are also members of the Americaniza-
tion classes, but have already been na-
turalized.
"Marsellaise Played
With animation; and skill, Mrs.
Lynch, accompanied by Fred H. Lewis,t
of Jackson, played "The Marseillaise"
as a cornet solo, following which Dr.
G. G. Always, presiding officer, in a
few words introduced President Mar-
ion L. Burton, the speaker of the oc-
casion.
The President, announcing as his1
subject, "Take Your Part," vividly re-
counted the various stages of the war,
from the first declarations In 1914 to
the signing of the Armistice. He
brought back visions of the days when
Paris was in danger, when American
men were being rushed to training
camps and to the front, when those
left at home took their part and back-
ed up the fighting forces, secrificing
more than the men in service ever
realized. He made both the men who
were in service and those who stay-
ed at home see again with equal vivid-
ness the scenes of those days, and de-
monstrated howr at that time idealism
entirely possessed the American mind,
compelling every man to take his part
and put forth heroic efforts.
Same Efforts Needed Now
Following directly from these remin-
iscences, 'the speaker brought home
with force the necessity of equal ef-
fort, equal unselfishness, in the pres-
ent. He showed how the opportunity
is now offered to the nations to dimin-
ish greatly the possibility of future
wars.
"I do not want anyone to get the
idea," said the President, "that I am
in favor of disarmament, total and im-
mediate. Conditions ar too disorder-
ly, too unsettled, for that. There is too
much policing to do. But now, when
deliberations are in progress for the
reduction or at least the limitation of

armaments, it is the duty of Americans
to impress their lawmakers, not spec-
tacularly, but yet strongly, with the
fact that they as a people are in favor
of disarmament.
Should Support Government
"There is a division of opinion with
regard to the efficacy of our govern-
mental system," said President Burton,
"and that division is essentially dan-
gerous. There is a class whose mem-
bers consider that the government is
too strong, that it infringes on the
rights of its citizens, and there is an-
other class whose members believe the
Republican form of government as we

nown it, is weak, and who actually
>pe for its downfall."
The President closed with a strong
ppeal for a united front in questions
f right and wrong, saying that only as
he line between the two was sharply
efined could any nation long endure.
e pleaded for loyal support of the
institution with all its amendments,
egardless of personal opinions as to
eir advisability, and brought out
trongly the necessity for every cit-
en to take his part.
The service closed with the singing
f "America" and "God Save the King,"
>llowed by taps.
Doughboys, gobs, and devil-dogs all
ell into ranks again behind the flag
hat led them on to victory in 1918
n yesterday's, parade through the
treets of Ann Arbor. And Ann Arbor
food by-hats removed-thinking of
he days when those same boys had
ffered their all on foreign fields.
(Continued on Page Eight)
ORCHESTRA MAKES
APPEARANCE AT
CONCERT SUNDAY
The University Symphony orches-
ra, Samuel Pierson Lockwood, con-
lucting, will give its first concert of
he season on the Faculty Twilight
eries at 4:15 o'clock tomorrow after-
oon in Hill auditorium.
The orchestra this year consists of
bout 60 players, representing all de-
artments of a well regulated concert
rchestra. Due to number and cali-
er of the tryouts this year, Mr. Lock-
wood has been able to organize an
>rchestra many of the members of
which might well occupy positions in
more pretentious organizations.
Marian Struble will be soloist. She
s a member of the violin faculty and
has made a name for herself in this
ection of the country in her various
concert appearances. During the
World war she spent many months
giving concerts for thesodiers in
France. She is a graduate of the
School of Music and -was for several
rears head of the violin department
at Hillsdale college, later being invit-
ed to join the Michigan faculty.
PROSPECTIVE TEACHERS
MUST APPLY T 4ONCE

(By Marion Kerr)
There was a kind of sadness yes-
terday in the air.
Perhaps it was made of the dreary
wind that whined into the marrow
of one's bones. Perhaps it was the
whitesnow, tainted with soot and
trampled under foot. Perhaps it was
the poppies worn over the heart like
spots of blood on Armistice day.
And agin, perhaps it was because
the wind whined as if it had blown
over battle fields, whined, because of
the shapeless masses of blood-stain-
ed, mud-spattered khaki that had
been left behind, in memoriam to -
war!
Snow Symbolic
There was sadness for the khaki-
clad boys who had not come back, a
symbolism in the snow that had fall-
en - yesterday - white and lovely,

and today was soot stained and tram-
pled. There was something poignant
in the stain of scarlet worn over the
heart, in memoriam to - wart
Yesterday, that was to have been
a day of gladness, a vacation, a rest
from the light routine of school, was
somehow a day of loneliness, of re-
membering, of wondering what the
great things could have been that
would make of Nov. 11 a celebration.
Martial Thrill Unawakened
Boys who had worn their olive drab
or navy blue three eyars ago, don-
ned them again yesterday, because
the people who had not been to war
wanted to see them. It was a part
of the day. As they marched through
the streets, with their paraphernalia
of war, their big guns, tractors and
khaki-colored trucks, with flags fly-
(Continued on Page Eight)

WATCH FOR PINK EXTRA
The Daily will put out anoth-
er pink extra today giving
a play-by-play account of the
Michigan-Wisconsin game. A
special wire has been leased from
Madison to The Daily so that
the extra will be on the streets
almost at the moment the game
ends.. Call 960 for returns dur-
ing the game; do not call The
Daily editorial office.
The publication offices will be
closed to all persons during the
game except those who are work-
ing on the editorial and business
staffs of the extra.
Watch for the pink sheet.
First on the streets with com-
plete reports of the game play-
by-play.

PASSING, KICKING, AND SI4
PRACTICE CONSTITUTE
PROGRAM
CONDITION OF FIELD
IS MATTER CHAD
Steketee Punts 65 Yards with
Showing Best Form of
Season

UNKNOWN SOLDIER
SIS PAID, NATION'S
-HIGHEST HONOR
FLAG-DRAPED CASKET OF NAME-
LESS HERO LAID TO REST
IN ARLINGTON
PRESIDENT HARDING
BESTOWS DECORATIONS
"Taps" Sound Requiem as Burial Sere.
ice is Brought to a
Close

DELEGATES READY
FOR, OPENING OF
ARMANENT MEET

I'I

LEADING POWERS
PLEDGED TO
TION IN

ARE SOLEMNLY
CO-OPERA-
TASK

I!

(By Associated Press)
Washington, Nov. 11.-The national

FEE

OF $1 WILL BE CHARGED FOR
REGISTRATION AFTER
MONDAY

Prospective teachers may enroll at
the Bureau of Appointments in rodm
105, Tappan hall, any time before Mon-
day night, after which a fee of $1 will
be charged for registration.
With an enrollment of 383 teachers
at the bureau so far this year, 342
positions have already been filled.
Calls From Many Places
Calls for teachers have come from
France, Porto Rico, the Phillipine Is-
lands, Canada, and Hawaii. Only 46
per cent of the calls came from the,
state of Michigan, the others being di-
vided among 41 other states and for-
eign countries. '
For the high schools English teach-
ers were in greatest demand, with calls
for 182. Mathematics teachers receiv-
ed 107 calls, Latin teachers 95 calls,
history 33 calls, and 82 calls for French
teachers.
Administrative openings have not
been nugerous, only 10 calls being re-
ceived for superintendents as compar-
ed with 25 calls last year.
Salaries Advanced
Teachers, salaries have advanced
considerable during the past two years
In 1919 94 per cent of the women re-
ceiving positions through the bureau
accepted salaries below $1,300. Thi
year only 8 per cent accepted posi-
tions below that figure, while 46 per
cent received salaries of $1,600 an
above.
Fifty-one per cent of the men ac
cepted positions paying below $1,800
in 1919. This year only 20 per- cen
took positions paying less than that
Twenty-six per cent of the men appli
cants this year have secured salarie
of $2,500 and above.

capital led the nation today in doing
homage to the unknown soldier from
France.
It was little more than broad day-
light before the tramp of marching
men, the clatter of hoofs and the grind
of gun cairiage wheels on the great
plaza before the capital told that the
last parade for the dead was forming.
Up past the gray mass of the build-
ing, under trees where only a yellow-
ed leaf here and there lingered, the
kahki tide of a funeral escort for a
general of the army rolled to its place.
Minute Guns Break Silence
As the troops gathered for the march
to the grave, the first, far throb of the
minute guns at Fort Meyer over the
river broke the morning silence.
Through the hours that followed the
distant, dull note of sorrow sounded
in measured interval, growing closer
and closer, lounder and louder as the
cortege wound its way up to Arlington.
The knell of the guns, marked the way
of the funeral train step by step and
culminated in the three crashing salvos
that signaled the last soldier farewell.
From 8:30 in the morning until far
past noon, the distant booming wrote
the story of the minutes with but one
halt, as the nation stood silent for two
minutes just after midday in honor
of the dead.
Rests on Catafalque
Up in the rotunda of the capitol,
resting on the catafalque where Lin-
coln, Garfield, Grant, and McKinley
laid, the casket had stood amid heap
ing piles of flowers with is silent guard
of honor, a soldier, a national guards-
man, a sailor and a marine, through
the night at the four corners of the
bier. Then there began to gather a
little group of fellow soldiers, each
wearing a hero's decorations, to bear
- the casket to the waiting gun car
riage. They were led by Sergeant
Samuel Woodfil, first mentioned in
Pershing's list of war heroes.
(Continued on Page Three)
aSTUDENTS INVITED
. TO ALUMNI SMOKER
Students who wish to attend th
e Detroit Alumni smoker at the Elks
- temple in Detroit this afternoon wil
r be welcomed by the Alumni associa
d tion. The smoker starts at 2:3
o'clock, city time, and at 3 o'clock re
- turns will begin to come in by lease
0 wire. Returns from other game
t throughout the country will be se
. cured quarter by quarter. Real Michi
- gan pep will chararterize the get-to
s gether and any who can go over t
Detroit will find it worth while.

WORLD OPINION URGES
PERMANEN F FRIENDSHIP:
Confidence in Success of Negotiations
Is Generally Mani-
fested
(By Associated Press)
Washington, Nov. 11.-With the eyes
of all the world fixed hopefully upon
them, the accredited spokesmen of the
powers will meet in Washington to-
morrow to try to find a way to ease
the heavy burdens of armament.
In the historic quest Great Britain,
France, Italy, Japan and the United
States, a group which acting together
can turn the whole tide of civilization
into new channels, all have pledged a
solemn and determined co-operation.
In addition China, Belgium, Portu-
gal and the Netherlands, invited be-
cause of ther vital interest in the
pertinent and crucial problems of the
Far East, will sit in the conference
to complete the circle of those who
are to strive for the new day of in-
ternational relationship.
Good Will Prevails
Outward manifestation of confi-
dence in the success of the negotia-
tions never have been more promi-
nent than on the eve of the assem-
bling of the delegates in formal con-
clave. Every nation is declared by its
leader to be ready to come to the con-
ference table with the spirit of un-
qualified good will or every other, and
behind there is a great urging force
of world opinion seeking translation
into the covenant of permanent friend-
ship.
Among the statesmen and diplomats
of the visiting nations the great topic
of interest tonight was the address
made at Arlington today by Presi-
dent Harding, who summoned the
conference into being, and who will
welcome it to American soil tomor-
row.
Support of America Pledged
Upon every hand was heard expres-
sions of satisfaction that in paying
his tribute to America's soldier dead
the chief executive seized the oppor-
tunity to renew the pledge of the
r United States to take its full share
- of leadership in the attainment of a
t better order.
i In the fulfillment of that pledge i
is the expectation of all the dele
gates that the American governmen
will place before the conference a
soon as it begins its work a concret
proposal for armament limitation
Such a proposal has been prepared b
the American delegates, and ther
e seems to be universal agreement tha
' as the initiator of the negotiation th
11 United States should have the firs
- say. Whether the proposal will b
0 submitted tomorrow, however, isa
question which present indication
d would answer in the negative.
is
- Winners of the oratorical prize wer
I- sometimes sent for to make thei
- "prize" speeches before Alumni asso
o ciations during the early history o
the public speaking department.

ENTERTAINMENT IN
TAP ROOM PLANNED
BY UNION TONIGHT
Two specialty numbers will be offer-
ed by the UD1"n entertainment com-
mittee beginning at 10:15 o'clock to-
night in the tap room. The first will
consist of a number of selections of
real Hawaiian music played by Dwan
Y. Tang, '24E, and Cyrus H. Tavares,
'24, on stringed instruments. The oth-
er will be violin and piano selections
by Edgar S. Bacon, '25, and Manley F.
Steinbaugh, '25.
The entertainment which was sched-
uled to have been given last Saturday
night hd to be postponed by the com-
mittee because several of the partic-
ipants were called out of town.
CHURCHES UNITE IN
ARMISTICE SERICES
As a tribute to the soldier dead of
the World war and as an evidence of
the support the churches of America
are giving the disarament conference,
the churches of Ann Arbor combined
for a union service at noon yesterday
in the Methodist church.
The services were short, lasting
only from 12:30 to 1 o'clock. Dr. L. A
Barrett, of the Presbyterian church,
presided, and prayer was offered by
Rev. G. A. 1Neuman, of the Bethlehem
Lutheran church.
In the address on "Reconciliation
of the Nations", Dr. J. B. Silcox, min-
ister of the Congregational church
paid homage to the men of all na-
tions who took part in the conflict
He also pointed out the necessity for
a spirit of friendship between all na-
tions. Special music was arrange
by* W. A. Wheeler, of the School o
Music faculty.
One of the most important thing
mentioned in Dr. Silcox's address wa
the disarmament creed of the Federa
1 Council of American Churches, rep
resenting 18 denominations and mor
than 30,000,000 Christians.
FOUR pLuCES NOUNCE'
e' FOOTBALL SCORES TOO00
Returns from the Wisconsin-Mich
t gan football game will be given play
- by-play this afternoon at the Unio
t A miniature football field will be pla
S ed in the second floor reading roo
6 to show the exact location of the ba
L throughout the game. Returns wi
y begin a little after 2 o'clock, Ann A
e bor time.
t The committee in charge of r
* turns is composed of Robert Neal
t '22E, chairman; George Townle
* '24, assstant chairman; James Mi
a ler, '23, Charles Waldron, '24, Tyl
* Marshall, '24, 3ohn Russell, '23
Walter G. McKee, '22E, Daniel Ve
tres, '22E, Arthur Davidson, '23, Wi
e bert G. Hartle, '24E, and ChGrles E
r Gessner, '23.
- Returns will also be received du
f ing the afternoon at the Majestic a
Areade theaters, and at Huston's

(By Thornton Sargent, Jr.)
Special Correspondent, The Dail
Madison, Wis., Nov. 11. - With
chilling breeze sweeping over Ca
Randall from Lake Mendota,
Michigan football team worked t
here today in preparation for 1
game tomorrow. A heavy layer
hay laid on the regular gridiron
protect it from a six-inch snow, mi
it impossible for the Wolverines
accustom themselves to the Badi
playing field.
For an hour the Varsity drilled
a reserve gridiron. Passing, kicki
and a little signal practice constil
ed the day's program. Steketee s
bis punts as far as 65 yards withI
wind, exhibiting the best form of
season.
f Two Places Undecided
With the exception of one halfb
and the quarterback position, Co
Yost has decided upon his lineup.
the past week "Hurry-Up" has b
worrying about these two places,
in all probability he *will not m
up his mind finally until just be
the game opens. His choice lies
tween Kipke and Steketee, and Ba
and Uteritz. In any event all t
men are practically certain to see
tion.
The condition of the field ton
row is mostly a matter of cha
Underneath the cover of hay,
gridiron has been partially protec
but it seems as if it will be in a
the same shape as was the mu
Illinois field two weeks ago.
f Wether Foi~cast
A better turf will make footin
little surer but there is a possib
that the freezing weather here
make a hard field. The weather f
cast is "fair and cold tonight"
on Saturday "fair weather with a
ing temperature."
For the first time in a week, M
son saw the sun today.
If the weather continues to be
cold, it is practically certain that
breaks will play a large part in
termining the outcome. The frigid
will chill the hands of the teams
sap their energy. Fumbles and
plays are likely.
- Reach Chicago Late
, on the journey to Madison the M
- igan team had a good night's l
. Becausd of the Michigan Central t
arriving late in Chicago, it was ne
sary to hold the Northwestern t
d for an hour and a half. The day
f here was spent in studying sig
and doubtful points in the. Mich
s attack and defense, and interni
s with the serious parts were songs
l bantering conversation concerning
- coming game.
e If Wisconsin possesses the sami
termined, aggressive spirit that
Michigan team does, the break
favor them. But the Michigan
porters along with the team fee
undercurrent of overconfidenc
Madison which may play a great
in helping the Wolverines to a vi
they are determined to get.
i~BANQUET PLANNEI
n. FOR CAMPAIGN M
m All workers on the Union driv
,1 life members which closed this
ll will be entertained at a banquet
r- Thursday, Nov. 17, in the Unilo:
sembly hall. A special progr
e- music and speeches has been ar
e, ed, with talks by R. E. Swart,
y, president of the Union; Mayna
t- Newton, '22, chairman for the
er paign, and an alumnus from D
E, The winning team, captained
n- A. Campbell, '24E, will be giver
1- cial recognition for its work.

H.
Special rates used to be gr
r- students on the Michigan Centi
nd they could go home for the Than
ing vacation.

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan