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November 11, 1921 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-11-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

s

Library Collection Of maps Shows
Slow Progress Of World Knowledge

Early maps, representing the work
o'f the 16th, 17th, and 18th centuries,
have been placed on exhibit in the low-
er corridor of the Library. While the
exhibit makes no pretense of com-
pleteness, it does present interesting
specimens of Mappemondes and Am-
erican maps. The maps show, to the
careful observer, how slowly inform-
ation concerning the size, shape and
position of the American continent
was obtained.
A facsimile of the earliest American
map known, that by Juan de la Cosa, a
pilot on the first voyage with Col-
umbus, is shown. The reproduction

was made in Spain. Of local interest
are several 18th century maps of the
Great Lakes region.
The three editions of the works of
Rosaccio could probably not be found
in any other American library. Philip
Cluver. whose geography is shown, was
one of the most famous geographers
of the 17th century. The facsimiles of
early maps are worthy of particular
attention as they give the form in
which most serious students of carto-
graphy use the material.
Among the 16th century maps on dis-
play those by Mercator, Hondius, Or-
telius, de Jode, Munster, Porcacchi and

de Bry are particularly worthy of at-
tention. Indocus Hondius began his
work as an editor of the maps of Ger-
ard Mercator, and prepared the maps
for works by Walter Raleigh, and the
voyages of Drake and Cavendish. Aft-
er his death his, son Henri de Jeune
became a well known geographer.
The great world map of Gerard Mor-
cator, of 1569, is represented by a fac-
simile of one portion representing
Florida and Cuba. Mercator won
fame by his new system of map pro-
jection which is still used today.
Another display of interest is the
volume called Mercurio Geographico,
containing the 1674 world map by San-
son. Maps by his sons and other works
the famous Italian house of Ricci are
also contained in the volume. The
Frand Atlas Universel, by Robert de
Vaugondy, the famous royal geograph-
er, is likewise displayed.
The geography book by Nicolas de
Fer, in which both text and maps are
printed from copper plates, is shown.
Maps by Homann and the Homann
heirs, published in Germany about the
same time are included in the 18th
century collection.
Another interesting map is the Or-
telius atlas, a product of the famous
Plantin press at Antwerp. Gerard de
Jode's atlas of 1578, is on display. This,
with the Mercator and Ortelius, came
to the University from one of its grad-
uates; W. C. >1urphy, who acted as
American consul at Frankfort.

WJ~omen
There will be an honor point hike,
starting from Barbour gymnasium at
9 o'clock Saturday morning, Nov. 12.
All women who have signed up for
swimming privileges at the Y. M. C.
A. must enroll in classes there before
8 o'clock Friday night, Nov. 11.
The probable hour for the usual
Normal course in playground instruc-
tion will be at 2 o'clock on Wednes-
days. The course will not be given un-
less at least 35 girls sign up for it.
All sophomore girls must pay the
freshman spread tax of $1 immediately
from 8 to 10 o'clock and 3 to 5 o'clock
Thursday at Dean Jordan's office or
at the women's room In University
hall.
Freshman Girls' Glee club will meet
at 4:15 o'clock Monday afternoon, Nov.
14, in the south parlor of Newberry

hall. All girls who have Michigan
song books are requested to bring them
to rehearsal.
No Women's league party will be
held this afternoon as was formerly
announced, due to the fact that it
would conflict with the meeting in
Hill auditorium which all students are
to attend.
SOPHOMORE GIRLS START
PLANS FOR NEXT YEAR'S PLAY
Sophomore girls made plans for the
next year's Junior Girls' play at a
meeting held Wednesday. A commit-
tee consisting of Catherine Stafford,
Helen Dehbridge, Sadybeth Heath, Dor-
is Crouse, Susan Fitch and Frieda Die-
koff, was elected to promote enthusi-
asm among the girls and to get some
initial plans under way.
Student Upholds Foreign Customus
In her talk on "India" at the ves-
per services Wednesday afternoon,
Asha Latika Haldar, grad., furnished
several surprises for her audience. In-
stead of seeming to apologize for the
customs of her people, which perhaps

to some of the customs of our coun-
try. She criticized what to her is our
formalism, shown in our tendency to
judge people and nations by their ex
terior qualities rather than their stan-
dards and idea;;.
Students in 1896 read current mag-
azines in Newberry hail.

:Ia'

III,

Friday - Saturday
Jack Hoxie
in
"Headin'
North"

. .. ..

AT THE THEATERS

4._

I

T 0 D A Y

ScresD

Arcade-"Experience"
All-star cast.

with an

(

.
r

w

1

Majestic--Gloria Swanson in El-
nor Glynn's "The Great Mom-
ent."

2'

{

i

Wue'rth-Pricilla Dean in "Repu-
tation."
Orpheum-Jack Hoxie in "Headin'
North."

We are showing

i

ORIGINAL MODEL HATS

THIS WEEK

NOW SHOWING

A romance written
especially for the
Star by Miss
ELINOR
GLYNI

F
r
..
,
t
I
t
!!
. .,rte .
, f . p ,

Stage

In bright colored Dube-
type and MIetal Cloth

Garrick (Detroit)--The musical
comedy sensation, "Up in the
Clouds."
Shubert Michigan (Detroit)- A
Goldwyn feature, "Theodora."
Tonight
Whitney - Graham Velsry in
"Just Suppose."
Sunday
Whitney-"U~p in the Clouds."

EMMA B. FOGERTY'S

Specialty Hat Shop
117 E. Liberty Street

FAMOUS AUTHOR OF

"THREE

WEEKS"

0

CALLED

"The Great Moment"
WLTH
GLORIA
SWA NSON

Armistice
Day
MATINEE
EVENING
PRICES

Armistice
Day
MATINEE

EVENING
PRICES

TODAY AND SATURDAY

A PRODUCTION OF TREMENDOUS SIGNIFICANCE
Experience
SEE THE MOST BEAUTIFUL GIRL IN
NEW YORK

Cast includes MILTON MILLS

The girl, a wild gypsy song in her heart, had wasted her
youth in sheltered luxury. The man, blazing civilization's
path through the wilds, cared nothing for woman or love
until - you'll want to see the great moment?
Other Usual Features
MICH IGAN - WISCONSIN
Football Game, play by play returns Saturday after-
noon. Minature gridiron, moving football, and score
board. GAME STARTS AT 2 O'CLOCK
COMING SUNDAY
UGeorge ane Tucker's
PRODUCTION

EDNA WHEATON

IN THE ROLE OF

BEAUTY

SELECTED FROM 10,000 APPLICANTS

A George Fitzmaurice
Production
-WITH-
RICHARD BARTHELMESS
PRESENTED BY ADOLPH ZUKOR

See the Garden Where Dreams Begin
--the Bevels of the Primrose Path-
the Corridors of Chance - Place of
Forgotten Hopes-the Rouse of Lost
Souls --the Land that Love Calls
Home. Run the whole gamut of life
In an hour and a half! In a great,
simple, human story, throbbing with
the heart-beat of the world.'

OTHER ADDED NOVELTIES
"COUNTRY CHICKENS"
FEATURING
FAZENDA AND CHESTER CONKLIN

SCHEDULE
Matinee,
2:00 and 8:80
Evenings
7:00 and 8:80

SPECIAL NOTICE
MICHIGAN -WISCONSIN GAV
Plays will be given every three minutes All rep
will be given here.

"tLADIES MUST LIVE"
HIS ONLY PICTURE SINCE "THE MIRACLE MAN."

COMING SUNDAY - WILLIAM S. HART in "THREE WORD BRAND"

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