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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 11, 1921 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-11-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

D

OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY
OF MICHIGAN
Published every morning except Monday during the Univer-
sity year by the Board in Control of Student Publications.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use for
republication of all news dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
credited in this paper and the local news published therein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
class matter.
Subscription by cagier, or mail, $3.50.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press building, Maynard Street.
Phones: Business, 960; Editorial, 2414.
Communications not to exceed 300 words, if signed, the sig-
nature not necessarily to appear in print, but as an evidence of
faith, and notices of events will be published in The Daily at the
discretion of the Liditor, if left at or mailed to The Daily office.
Unsigned communications will receive no consideration. No man-
uscript will be returned unless the writer incloses postage.
The Daily does not necessarily endorse the sentiments ex-
pressed in the communications.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
MANAGING EDITOR .......BREWSTER P. CAMPBELL
Assistant Managing Editor..................Hugh W. Hitchcock
City Editor.............................. E. P. Lovejoy, Jr.
Night Editors-
R. E. Adams G. P. Overton
Edward Lamibrecht M. B.Stahl
Hughston McBamn Paul Watzel
Editorial Board Chairman......................T. J. Whinery
Assistants-
S. T. Beach E. R. Meiss
L. A. Kern Leo Hlershdorfer
Sunday Magazine Editor.............Thornton W. Sargent, Jr.
exchange Editor.......................,.....George E. Sloan
Music Editor..............................Sidney B. Coates
Sporting Edit,)r .............George....... Reindel
Women's Editor ..........................lizabeth Vickery
Humor Editor.................................E R. Meiss
Assistants
R. N. Byers L. L. Fenwick B. H. Lee
W. B. Butler H. B. Grundy k E. Mack
A. D. Clark Agnes Holmquist athrine Montgomery
Harry C. Clark H. E~. Howlett R. C. Moriarity
JP. Comnstock Marion Kerr R. B. Tarr
ohn P. Dawson L. S. Kerr Virginia Tryon
. A. Donahue M. A. Klaver Dorothy Whipple
W. F. Elliott Marion Koch L. L.5Yost

WW " a s ayau-

,. B Young

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
BUSINESS MANAGER............. VERNON F. HILLERY
Advertising......................F. M. Heath, A. J. Parker
Publication ........................... Nathan W. Robertson
Accounts .. .............................. John J. Hamels, Jr.
Circulation. .............................. Herold C. Hunt
Assistants
S Burr L. Robbins Richard Cutting H. Willis Heidbreder
W. Cooley James Prentiss W. Kenneth Galbraith
L. Beaumont Parks Maurice Moule . A. Dryer
Walter Scherer ui atin Goldring Richard Heidemann
Udw. Murane Tyler Stevens T. H. Wolfe
David Park Paul Blumi
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 1921
Night Editor-M. B. STAHL
Assistant-Robert C. Moriarty. Proof-
readers-Jack Briscoe, John Bulk-
ley.
ARMISTICE DAY
Today the people of the United State Pay fit-
ting tribute to the memory of those who gave their
all on the field of battle in the greatest cause for
which man ever laid down his life. Throe years
have now elapsed since the signing of the Armis-
tice, three years since the world has been freed from
the menace of death and the yoke of restraint which
war places upon humanity. During the interval
which has passed since the peace pact was issued,
men have tried to erase all thoughts of those years
of horror from their minds, and have been bending
all their energies, directing all their efforts towards
repairing the damage and destruction which the rav-
ages of war brought about.
The past three years have- been devoted entirely
to reconstrution, and to forgetfulness of those
dark scenes - but not to forgetfulness of the men,
and women, too, who so gloriously, so unselfishly,
surrendered that which we all hold dearest-Life-
that others might live, and that a horde of barbar-
ians might be-prevented from destroying the ideals
of democracy. On various occasions men and
women of this country, and of the other nations
with which we were allied, have set up memorials
to the memory of these heroes, but today is set
aside as the day on which the people of those coun-
tries lay aside all labor and offer up prayer for the
perpetuation of the memories of the deceased -y
"that they shall not have died in vain."
Here in Ann Arbor all ex-service men, men who
fought in the Allied cause, will parade, together
with other school and patriotic organizations. No
man who feels any pride for the flag for which he
fought or for the country to which he gave so much
of his loyalty and service will fail to recognize that
it his duty to march in the ranks today. Let every
man turn out in his full uniform, to make Armis-
tice day in Ann Arbor the celebration that it de-
serves to be.
AMERICA'S "MODERNS"
Much has been written on the trend of modern
literature in America - so much in fact which is
so nicely contradictory that one wonders whether
he should believe the man who tells him that the
naturalistic novel is the ultimate thing in fiction or
whether he should believe that other "old-fash-
ioned" fellow who claims that it is immoral, unnat-
ural, abnormal and all of the other extremely
naughty things which he can say against it.
,Perhaps a more sober judgment should prevail in
the matter, and one searching the middle ground
.between the views of these two extremists, should
say that "the moderns", as they are pleased to call
themselves, have so far failed to produce the great
works of art which their favorable critics are al-.
ways heralding, but that they "may".
But all of that is rather incomplete and savors
somewhat of the sort of judgment which is a mere
"passing of the buck". It is not meant to be. A
man whose instinct for art is so cramped, so pe-
culiarly constructed, it might be said, that he be-
Neves sguch worksc ac hae rm. from 1Pa vto

naturalists during the past few years - most of
them lacking practically all of the rudiments of
style - are really art and are the final word in fic-
tion writing, is certainly no man by whose critical
judgments we should be bound; but conversely, the
man who says that they are all "rot" is just as nar
row as the first.
America has caught late the naturalistic trend
of literature which gripped the European countries
slightly some forty years ago, but now that it has
really gripped it, it is holding on in deadly earnest.
But the movement here is only in its infancy. It can-
not be expected that great works of art can come
from men who are just beginning to feel its spirit
and then, too, naturalism is peculiarly unadapted to
American ideals. It is distinctly a condition of the
mind which has come from European ideals and un-
til America catches the spirit which has been re-
sponsible for it, it seems almost futile to expect that
we shall ever produce anything at all which is really
art. .
In some of our writers - take Dreiser for exam-
ple --- the mood has been achieved, but he is lacking
in the ability of expression. His thought is there,
you can almost hear it begging for expression, but
the man seems incapable of achieving the form
which is necessary for what he desires to do.
Some day, from out of the new tradition which
we must admit to be growing up in America, we
may expect something which will be truly great.
But until that time comes, until our novelists ac-
custom themselves more thoroughly to the form
and steep themselves in the tradition which is neces-
sary for an artistic expression through naturalistic
channels, it seems almost futile to expect that any
fully-rounded, artistically expressed work of art
shall come.
MISLEADING OPTIMISM
It is the function of the newspaper to be cheerful
but it would seem that some journals, with their
glowing accounts of the rejuvenation of industry,
are carrying the "Pollyanna" idea to an extent
likely to work real hardship on job-hunters. There
is no use being pessimistic, but optimism should
never go to the extent of causing men with a living
to earn to seriously pursue pots of gold at the end
of rainbows.
With the employment situation as it is at present
the job-seeker will find it advisable not to rush off to
some town where the local paper boasts vain-glor-
iously of busy factories, without first consulting a
few "Help Wanted" colums. In them he will
find a reliable barometer and can take boom stories
with a grain of salt.
The next best thing to going to Madison next
Saturday is to go down to Detroit for that alumni
smoker. There'll be eats, drinks, talks, cheers,
play-play results of the game, and plenty of PEP.
Our idea of an institution that is entirely use-
less is the common municipal ordinance that re-
quires people to keep their sidewalks clean under
pain of being fined.
the Telescope
Some People Sure Think Deeply
Dear Erm, I hereby come to you
To ask a question deep,
A problem that has bothered me
And used up hours of sleep.
I've searched through great thick volumes,
And encyclos by the score,
But I guess that they have left this out,
A fact that makes me sore.
You never yet have failed me,
I must give you just dues,
So tell me where and what becomes
Of the polish on our shoes?
-Imp.
Stories" We Don't Believe:

The husband gently helped his wife across the
street, and then gallantly switched his position so
he should be on the part -of the sidewalk nearest
the curb.

Ii

GRAHAM'S
Iloth ends of the diagonal Fvalk

I ______________________________________

DETROIT UNITED LINES
Ann Arbor and Jackson
TIME TABLE
(Fastern Standard Time)t
Detroit Limited and Express Cars-6.o5 a.
m., 7:05 a. m., 8: o a. in. and hourly to 9:i0
p. mn.
Jackson Express Cars (local stops of Ann
arbor), 9 :48 a. i, and every two hours to
9:48 p. in.
Local Cars East Bound-s :5s a.m., 7:00 a.
m. and every two hours to 9 :oo p. m.,ix :oo
p. in.'To Ypsilanti only-ii:4o p. m., i2.2s
a. mn., i :T5 a. in.
To Saline,, change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars West Bound-7:50 a. M., 2:40 p.
Mn.
To Jackson and Kalamazoo-Limited cars:
3;:48, 10:481 a. mn., 12:48, 2:48, 4:48.
To Jackson and Lansing-Limited: 8:48
*i. in.
1921 NOVEMBER 1921
1 2 3 4 6i
6 7 8 9 10 11 12
13 14 15 16 17 18 19
20 21 22 23 24 25 26
27 28 29 30
NOTICE TO MEN
We do all kinds of high-class Hat
work at pre-war prices. Hats turned
'nside out, with all new trI'llIllnilgs,
are as good as new.
FACTORY HAT STORE
617 PACKARD STREET
Telephone 1792
Y Sr

Hemstitching Picot Edge Dress Pleating Plain Stitching
Gold and Silver Thread Work
QUALITY HEMSTITCHING SHOP
711 NORTH UNIVERSITY AVENUE PHONE 2526
Room 12, Over Arcade Theatre
MRS. G. E. MICKLE ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN
TWO TROUSER SUITS - $50.00
MADE TO YOUR INDIVIDUAL MEASURE
IN OUR OWN SHOP
SUITS ALSO MADE FROM YOUR OWN MATERIAL
ALBERT GANSLE, CUSTOM TAILOR
113 SOUTH MAIN STREET
Second Floor.
TheTendency of Every
Mnsto Live up to
Hi s Name

_..

Log Log Slide Rules

AT

buys a brand
$SOnew Corona
portable type-
writer. Other males
at attractive prices.
See usbefore you buy.'
0. D. 1ORRILL
Ann Arbor.Mich.

17 Nickels Arcade

YOU, MR. STUDENT
should have use for
a typewriter. You
can rent one from us
Y for three mouths for
$7.50 up. Or you
can rent with privi-
lege of buying. At
any time up toasix
months we will allow
all rent you have
paid to count against
sale price of machine. There is no obli-
gation to buy. This offer is made to
save you money if you find you want to
own a machine after first renting.
Your Choice of Makes
State your choice: Underwood, Rem-
ington, L. C. Smith, etc. Every machine
is perfectrebuilt by the famous "Young
Process." This process is our own. It is
recognized the country over. It is back
of our iron-clad guarantee which makes
you judge and jury. We grant io days'
free trial on all our machines. You run
no risk.
Get Our Prices
We save you 50 per cent and up on type-
writers. All makes and models to select
from-the largest selected stock of ma-
chines in America. Send for catalog be-
fore you rent or buy any where. Write
today!l
YOUNG TYPEWRITER COMPANY
25 W. Lake St., Dept. 234, Chicago
Phone Central 46

By J. R. HAMILTON
Former Advertising Manager of Wanamaker's, Philadelphia

ir

Wherever you find a good name you will find some man
trying to live up to it. Character follows reputation far more
quickly than reputation follows character. No one ever lost hisi
good name except through folly.
What the world thinks of a man is the 'fery best moral tonic
that is sold under the label of philosophy.
And it is the same with merchandise as it is with men. The;
nameless thing is dreaded everywhere, while the thing with a
good name is usually good because you expect it to be.
Men grow proud of their products. You will find a malnu
facturer saying, "This shoe has got to be good because it bears
my name." You will find a canner saying, '1 cannot use lye any
more than I can tell a lie." You will find a clothing manufac-
turer saying, "If I am 'all wool,' my clothing must also be all
wool."
And so it goes with every single product that carries a brand
or a name. Whenever a man sets a standard, he strives to live up
to it; and whenever the world sets that standard, he doubles the'
effort.
Which simply means, if you want the best, you must ask for
the best. And every time you ask, you make it better.
There is hardly one of you readers who does not know the
name of every good product on the market. From clothing to
sugar and from hosiery to baking powder some good name is
indelibly fixed in your mind, yet, when you ask for an article,
most of the time you do not use that name.
And every time you fail to do so, you discourage the maker,
you lower the standard for yourself and you allow some inferior
thing to gain in strength and capacity.
Let this go home in your mind: You set the standard of mer-
chandise. The maker follows your ideals, Adulterations creep
in through your laxity. Whenever you ask for any old thing,
you get it.
While you are reading the advertising news in this paper
today, make up your mind to ask only for what you know to be
good; to learn what is best and demand it and to have no parley
with the nameless things of trade.
(Copyrighted.)

cl

t"

"ESPECIALLY CAREFUL

SERVICE

,,

for

PARTICULAR PEOPLE"

This is what you get
when you have
SWAIN

Quoth Eppie Taff:
Inside a fiercely burning house
Matt Feinn his death did meet,
He tried out an asbestos suit
Which failed to stand the heat.
Our Latest Song Entitled:
"She Fell Down, Notwithstanding."

DEVELOP AND PRINT
YOUR FILMS

713 EAST UNIVERSITY

Av.

An Arbor Daze:
An unexpected holiday placed on the University
schedule.

A good morning to see our

Stolen Thunder
They say the country girl is shy
And full of dignity,
But, really it's the city girl
That seems most shy to me.

She flaunts a skirt cut rather high,
And quite a length of hose;
I'd say the city girl was shy
When you refer to clothes.
- Punch Bowl.
Famous Closing Lines
"I'm fast," said the co-ed as she hung on the

They're built for serkice
WAGNER & COMPANY
For Men Since 1848
STATE STREET A T LIBERTY

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