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September 29, 1921 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 1921-09-29

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ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDA-, SEPTEMBER 29, 1921

Pi

3

MBINATION
LWAYS INTO
W SYSTEMS

1 9 1

BROPHY APPOINTED.
UNION SECRETARY
George 0. Brophy, '22L, has been
appointed general secretary of the
Union, an office which was vacant last
year. The work was handled by Paul
Eaton, '21, president of the Union, but
the duties of both offices proved to be
too great for one man.
George Hurley, '18L, held the office
during the year 1919-1920, and it is
now to be revived in order to relieve
the president of much detail work,
correspondence and directing in the
Union organization itself. Brophy's
term will extend throughout the col-
lege year. His office is located at
the north end of the student activity
room on the third fior of the Union

Freshman n entors Will be Advised
President Burton and Gower
at Union

byI

ADVISERS REGEIVE
ORDERS TONI6HTi

ERCE COMISSION THINKS
CTION WOULD ABOLISH
WEAKNESSES
L TRY TO MAINTAIN
GE ROADS IDENTITY

I That Consolidation Can Be.
pleted Without Sale of
Properties

Comr-

building. Office hours will be
nounced later.

an-1

(By Associated Press)
washington, Sept. 28. - A tentative
n for consolidation of all major
terican railroads into 19 great com-
ing systems was announced today
the Interstate Commerce commis-
a.
Will Remove Weaknesses
The proposed combination, author-
d under the transportation act, is
ilgned to remove weaknesses that
national railroad system has
wn under the operation of the rate
eking power of the commission and
effect readjustmentofm'communal
I. other subsidiary facilities with re-
tant economy in operation.
Weak lines which have shown their
bility to "live" under rate ached-
s permissible to stronger rpads,
old under the plan be attached to
tems more advantageously situat-
It was announced that in every
ie an effort was made to maintain
identity of existing strong sys-
hearings will be called by the com-
ssion for the purpose of discussing
proposed consolidation. Since,.
der the law, no plan can be adopt-
which has not been given the ap-
>val of the individual lies affected
well as that of the commission, it
s expected that discussion would
prolonged and that a number of
lificatIons from the plan made pub-
today would be suggested
Follows ipley Plan
n the main, this ,plan follows the
es of consolidation worked out un
the direction of the Interstate
rnmerce commission by Prof. Wil-
an C. Ripley of Harvard college, but'
e changeswere made and alterna-
es proposed.-
'rofessor Ripley suggested that the
isolidations, if decided upo., could
brought about without sale of
>pertles, through the exchange of
urities betwen the corporations
rticipating in mergers.
JillIiU ILT VWtR bM
90YEA I GIN
Freshman engineers to the number
400 met for the first time yester-
y in room 348 of the Engineering
ilding, to be welcomed by Dean
rtimer E. Cooley, of the engineering
lege.
)ean Cooley spoke on the opportun-
es and responsibilites that fall to or
e thrust upon the engineer. He ad-
ed the men to start right by build-
a solid foundation of general
owledge, saying that it is easy to
too eager to specialize. He recom-
3 ded the training of the R. 0. T. C.,
dch, he said, would be useful in the
oft of another world war. Major
bert Arthur of the R. O. T. C. fol-
w ed .Deai Cooley.
the, assemblies are compulsory
oughout the semester.

1922 1ENS1KNSTAFF
STARTS WORK ON BOOK
WILL ATTEMPT TO HAVE PUBLI-
CATION COMPLETED BY
APRIL 1
Work on the 1922 Michganensian
has already started and preparations
for the sales campaign are being
made, according to R. Wieneke, '22,
business manager of the 'Ensian.
"An attempt will be made to get
the 1921 'Ensan out some time in
April," stated Wieneke, "and the co-
operation of the various students and
organizations is necessary. It is im-
perative that all seniors have their
pictures taken as soon as possible.
All work must be In the hands of the
staff at an early date and Nov. 18 is
the final date for pictures to be ac-
cepted. Seniors should begin today to
make arrangeemnts for sittings. Offi-
cial photographers are Dey, Randell,
Rentschler and Spedding."
Organizations, including classes,
fraternities, and clubs, are allowed sit-
tings from Jan. 3 to 28 only.
Vaudeville Acts
Feature Of New
Theater rProgram
Variety week-end programs will be
featured during the coming year at
the new campus playhouse now under
construction on the site of the old
Union, which is to be known as the
Mimes Campus theater. A combina-
tion of burlesques, one-act comedies,
dramas and moving pictures will be
given beginning shortly after the
close of the opera tour.
- All Old Favorites
Included in the list of burlesque
attractions which will be produced
are such travesties as Richard Carles'
"Way up Yeast," "Barbara Fidegity,"
"Quo Vas Iss," "Sapolio," "Waffles,"
"Diplunacy," "Secret Servants," "Du
Hurry," and several others of the
first order, according to E. Mortimer
Shuter, director of Union dramatics.
In announcing the program for the
new theater Shuter said; "We are
out to please the student body, and
intend to make the program for this
winter a popular means 'of week-end
entertainment."
Admission Charge Small
In all probability movies only will
constitute the program on Sunday aft-
ernoons and evenings with a combin-
ed program for Fridays and Saturdays,
A small =admission charge, which will
be determined by the cost of the pro-
duction, will be made at all perform-
ances.
Talent for these new Mimes' pro-
ductions will be drawn from tryouts
including men who have had teXperi-
ence in skits, monologues, or vaude-
ville acts. All men desiring parts in
these acts should consult Mr. Shuter.
MUST MAK UORRECTIONS
FOR DIRECTORY BY OCT. 1
Students who did not put down an
Ann Arbor addresses or telephone
number on their registration blanks,
may call or mal this data to the Stu-
dents' Directory, Press building, until
Oct. 1. This applies also to correc-
tions in address or telephone number.-

All fraternities, sororities, and house
clubs, must have typewritten lists of
members in at the office of the Direc-

COMMITTEE HAS PREPARED
INSTRUCTION BOOK FOR WORK
Upperclass advisers fqr this year
will learn of the purpose, methods, and
value of their work tonight when they
meet at 7:15 o'clock at the Union to
complete plans for the advisory work
of the year. President Marion L. Bur-
ton will address the meeting and W.
W. Gower, '23, chairman of the com-
mittee will explain in detail the duties
fof the men.
Have Issued Booklet
Supplementing the addresses at the
meeting, an eight page booklet ex-
plaining the purpose of the organiza-
tion will be given to all advisers, con-
taining information which they will
find valuable when having talks with
their freshmen. Not only does the
book give instructions, but also gives
a tone of the whole work, advising the
men In the way to approach their
charges, and impressing on them the
importance of their work.I
Speaking of the necessity of all ad-
visers attending the meeting, Gower
said, "We hope all the men who have
signed up will attend, for we must
have a firm apd unified organization.
President Burton believes the work is
one of the most valuable things which
can be done to maintain the spirit and
high standards of the University, and
it is highly important that all the men
hear his address. We must also get
started immediately in meeting the
men, and the meeting tonight will start
off the work."
Need More Advisers
A few more upperclassmen are need-
ed on the committee, Gower stated, but
nearly all of the 450 required have
volunteered. All men intested in
the work are requested to come to
the meeting, as some men in reserve
are needed in addition to those who
are needed to complete the quota.
Following the lack of success of last
year's organization, the committee
this year has taken hold with plans to
make the work of the advisers what it
should be on the campus and give it
the prominence it has been hoped it
would assume. Instructions in the
booklet which is to be issued give
much advice which is far friom appli-
cable to advisers alone.
Good Start Essential
Emphasizing the factthat the fresh-
man is the biggest potential element
on the campus, the booklet shows that
on his attitutde and actions in the first
few weeks he is here depend almost
entirely his whole college life, and his
effect on that life. That Michigan
wants her freshmen, that they are not
undesirable and to be discouraged, is
prevalent In the tone throughout the
booklet.
Michigan must train, encourage,
busy and work with her freshmen, the
booklet says, a'nd must forget that the
time ever existed when the freshman
was the object of discouragement and
abuse. All this is the work of the ad-
visers, says the booklet, and with them
rests the possibility of a'greater or a
lesser Michigan.
OLD AND NEW WOMEN
ENTERTINED Bf, LEAGUE
University women were entertained
last night at the first Women's league
party of tpe year. Following the re-
ception, which gave all entering wom-
en an opportunity to meet bean Myra
B. Jordan, Mrs. Marion L. Burton,
Mrs. J. F. Efhinger, Miss Marion

Wood, and Miss Marion Dawley as
well as all' of the upperclasswomen,
parts of last year's Judior Girls' play
were given.
Elise Smith, '22, Christine Murkett,
'22, and Mildred 'phase, '22, were
among the stars who gave some of
the most popular songs from ┬░aSelina
Sue."
An hour of dancing and refresh-
ments followed. The affair was given
for the purpose of acquainting the
women of the class of '25 with those
of the other classes already on the
c'ampus. ,4

HOURS OF HEALTH
SERVICE EXTENDED
Announcement that the hours of
the University Health service will be
extended from the former schedule of
9 to 12 In the morning and 2 to 4 in
the afternoort to a schedule of 8 to 12
and 2 to 5, was made last night by
Dr. Warren E. Forsythe.
"We are making this change min or-
der to take care of the increased
number of students requiring our at-
tention, especially since the physical
examination rule has been made toE
include upperclassmen as well as
freshmen," said Dr. Forsythe. "No
student will now have any excuse for
not appearing for examination, nor
will it necessitate his absence from
classes.'
e LOW

"LOYALTY . THE WJTCHWORD,"
BURTON TELLS MEN OF 192 SCN-FIH9 I

i

CLAIM

LANSING INEFFICIENCY IS
RESPONSIBLE FOR
DELAY

According to B.. F. Hausman, '22E,
adjutant of Richard N. Hll post,
Veterans of Foreign Wars, there are
more than 50 ex-service men in the
University who have not yet received
the bonus given by the state of Mich-
igan and who depend upon this money
to help pay their way through col-
lege this year. It is expected that
Commander N. K. Chamberlin, '22E,
will call a meeting of the post this
week and that pressure will be
brought to bear upon officials at
Lansing to speed up the payment of;
the bonus money. Leonard L. Fen-
wick, '22, quartermaster of Richard N.
Hall post, says that the delay is not
due to insufficient funds but a lack of
help -at Lansing to handel the enor-
mous amount of clerical work con-
nected with issuing the bonus checks.
AMERICAN ACE ,PASU
AT ENGINEERING SMOKER
Eddie V. Rickenbacher, known
throughout many countries as the
Dean of American Aces, was the prin-
cipal speaker at the Enginering
smoker held last evening at the
Union. Rickenbacher was introduced
to his audience by Donald Porter,
'21, a former ace, and a "buddy" of
Eddie-.
Dean Mortimer E. Cooley, of the
Engineering college, developed the op-
portunities of "aces" in civil life. With
the present unsettled condition of the
world, the dean said, the need of pio-
neers and leaders correspondingly in-
creased.-
Music donated by Robert Dubach's
orchestra, food and the tobacco part
of the smoker completed the evening.
RD SORY COMMITTEL
ORGNIZES'FOR YEAR
At the first meeting of the Student
Advisory committee, held Sept. 27,
it was decided that the regular meet-
ings with Dean J. A. Bursley would
be held at 4:30 o'clock op the first
and third Monday afternons of each
month.
The committe men are Douglas
Dow, '22E, chairman; Paul Goebel,
'23E, secretary; Walter Ray, '22,
Maurice Atkenson, '22, and T'homas
Underwood, '22L. Ex-offico members
are. Brewster Campbell, '22, Angus
Goetz, '22M, and Emerson Swart,
'22E.
Soph Committee Hlds First Meeting
With the aim of making this year's
committee one of the most efficient
in years, several new ideas were put
into execution at the initial meeting of
the underclass conduct committee,
held last night in the J'nion.,
Announcements of the method of
reaching this year's committee, in ord-
er to 'report violations of tradition, to-
Ugether with an explanation of the
aims and purposes of the committee
will be made public soqn.

STATE SCHOOLMEN 'MEET TO
DISCUSS REORGANIZATION
A group of schoolmen, including
some of the most prominent educa-
tors in Michigan, will meet at 2
o'clock this afternoon at the Uion
to discuss the reorganization of the
Michigan State Teachers' association.
Edwin L. Miller, principal of Detroit
.Northern high school, will preside.
Others, expected to be present are
Superintendents Butler, ofAnn Ar-
bor,* Cody, of Detroit, Greeson, of
Grand Rapids, and Sexton, of Lan-
sing. %Several men from the School
of Education will take part.
VOE$55000 tTO
d .:
Michigan Manufacturers Donate Money
to Carry on Industrial In-
vestigation
BURTON THINKS PLAN WILL
BETTER .FACTORY METHODS
At a joint meeting of the directors
of the Michigan Manufacturers' asso-
ciation and representatives of the de-
partment of Engineering-research held
at Barton Hills Country club Tuesday,
the manufacturers decided to provide
a fund of $25,000 for further work of
'this department. This action was tak-
en after a long discussion of the possi-
bilities of what could be accomplished
by further and extended work of the
department py several members of
the faculty.
Besides the directors of the associa-
tion, President Marion L. Burton, Re-
gent Benjamin S. Hanchett, of Grand
Rapids, Regent Junius E. Beal, of Ann
Arbor, and' Mr. Frank Fletcher, of Al-
pena, former Regent of the Univer-
sity, were present.
President Burton explained to the
directors of the association that it
would be -impossible for the Univer-
sity to finance the work of the depart-
ment but expressed the earnest hope
that the directors could find some
means of carrying on the work which
he considers as very important to the
advancement of industrial efficiency.
F. W. Hutchins, president of the
association called upon others present
to give remarks. All who spoke were
desirous of keeping the work of the
department up to standard and every-
one present seemed enthusiastic about
the possibilities of so doing. After
these remarks, a motion to make an
assessment of $250 upon each memer
of the 'advisory committee of 100, was
unanimously adopted. This amount
will be sufficient to get the work under
way and it is expected that shortly
other funds will be available for the'
work.
FOTH TRADITIONS DAY
SET FOR FRIDAY NIGHT,
Freshmen of Michigan will be giv-
en their first chance to learn Michi-
gan customs at the fourth annual
Traditions day meeting Friday night
in Hill auditorium, according to plans

drawn up at the Student council
meeting last night.
"Definite plans for the event are
not yet complete, but things are shap-
ing themselves fast," stated Angus G.'
Goetz, '22M, president-of the Student
council, last night. "The Varsity band:
will be there and will demonstrate
one true Michigan tradition - PEP."'
Cheers also are scheduled on the pro-
gram and Al Cuthbert, '22E, Varsity
cheer elader, will be on hand to show
the freshmen how to yell. Prof. Rob-
eit M. Wenley will represent the fac-
ulty and *ill address the assemblage.
It is expected that George 0. Bro-
phy, '22L, will be the student speaker
and an alumni speaker is yet to be se-

PRESIDENT MAKES STIRID
PEAL TO ASSEMBLAGE
500 YEARLINGS
EACH NEW MAN ME]
PRESIDENT PERSONI
Are Advised to Help Themsel
Lendiug Aid to Fellow
Men
More than 500 freshmen a
the second annual reception I
incoming class last night in I
sembly hall of the Union.
A committee composed of m
of Sphinx and Triangles of
James B. Fry, '22, was chairm
ceived the men at the door,
they formed into 'a long lii
were later personally welcome
the University by Presient
L. Burton.
Swart Opens Meeting
Following the reception Er
Swart, '22E, presidentpofnthe
in a short introductory addre
phasized the importance of the
to the large class of incomin
and laid particular stress upo
man giving the Union his unqi
support. Swart then intr
President Buton, who launch
a short addess, both of welco
advice. President Burton .s
part:. "There are two classes
pe -drifters and anners. d
the time fdr you to decide w
the two you shall be. Do not 1
the present. An African savag
for today, the Chinese cgolie '
the past, though he is graduall
ing around to look toward the
but you men of the class of '2
live to make the future a presex
ity. > The greatness of the
States is found in the hopes,
tions, ambitions and ideals of o
and women.
Lend ,Helping hand
"You mei \vWll go out from MI
in four years with a new set of
principles, and hop s, but the
most principle in your plans f
future should be to make the r
yourself. However, do not ;get
top by crushing your fellow
Germany has sufficiently prov
such methods cannot succeed
way to get there is to lend a l
hand to everyone and by so do
will be more greatly benefitei
above all, be loyal. Loyalty
watchword of every Michigan
and loyalty as a citizen to Mi
guarantees future success and
ness."
Dishop In L urtG
Buying New Bo
Librarian William W. 3ishop
in Europe buying up books wh
University needs. So &r he h
in London and Manchester and:
visiting book dealers inParis,
and Rome.
Mr. Bishop was also the offlci
resentative of the American x
association and the Universit:
meeting of the English Librar:
ciation held during the second i
September at Manchester.
Librarian Bishop sailed Aug..
will return to Ann Arbor sod
in December. During his abse
Francis Goodrich Is in charge
Library.
F. E. ROBBINS IS
PRESIDENT'S A

Dr. Frank E. Robbins, as
professor of Greek, has bee
pointed assistant to President
L. Burton to succeed Oscar L
whose resignation was accep
Sept, 1. Official announcement
appointment is made in the
Bulletin this morning.

VISES SENIOR LIFE
ERS TO PAY $4 AT ONCE
First Installment of Pledge
d Save Each M4n
$6.00
* A
who have taken out life
s in the Union can save $6
e a paymetn on their mem-
ore Dec. 1. In many in-
a have pledged themselves
a year for five successive,
they have graduated. If
life members will make a
now, the Union will cancel
nnual installment of $10,
ag a saving to the men. The
>btain the $6 from the Uni-

Open Social Billed
There will be an op
at 8 o'clock Thursday
29. at the Bethlehe
church, South Fouti

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