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November 06, 1921 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-11-06

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TODAY

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Ar Ap
AL
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Iaitg

ASSOCIATE
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT
SERVICE

No. 37.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN:~SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 1921

PRICE FIVE

UNION PAMPH LETS
MALED BY DRIVE
WORKERS TO'NIGHT
APPROXIMATELY 1,600 BOOKLETS
CONTAINING FULL DATA
DISTRIBUTED
WILL DIVIDE CAMPAIGN
AREA INTO DISTRICTS
Arrange "Flying Squadron" for Cases
of Emergency or First Attempt
Failures

RELIGIOUS EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTE
OPENS WITH BANQUET MONDAY NIGHT

"The New Christia Leadership*
will be the subject of the address by
Prof. J. L. Brumm, of the department
of rhetoric and journalism, at the
opening banquet of the institute of re-
ligious education, to be held at 6
o'clock Monday evening in the Con-,
gregational church.r
Shirley W. Smith, secretary of the
University, will be the toastmaster of
the banquet. Following Professor]
Brumm's address the teachers of the
various groups will briefly outline
their programs and all the classes will

NEW ENROLLMENT RP'TPBISE
REPORT~ PULSE

More than 1600 illustarted pamphlets
telling the story and purpose of the
Michigan Union were mailed yesterday
to all non-members of the Union in
Ann Arbor and vicinity, as a pre-cam-
paign primer for the life membership
drive which begins next Tuesday. The
booklet contains data. comparing the
membership standing, fees, and the re-
lative value of membership in the
Michigan Union and in similar organ
izations in other universities.
"Squadron" Again to Work
The campaign this year will be di-
vided geographically into districts
which will be solicited by teams com-
posed of ten men each. Each man will
call upon a group of non-members who
are located within one small aiaa in
order that the work may be completed
rapidly and duplication of effort avoid-
ed. In the event that a first visit to
the prospective member does not re-
sult In his signing for his membership
card, the so-called "flying squadron,"
a special committee composed of pick-
ed solicitors, will be called upon to in-
terview and convince.the skeptical one
of the necessity of his signing both
to himself and to the perpetuation of
the Union.
The life membership fee for resident
students is $50 which may be paid at
once or in $10 payments. All funds
collected in the campaign will be add-
ed to the Union building fund, which
must be kept at a level which will in-
sure the Union against an enlargement
of its present debt.
Prize for Best Work
The campaign will be conducted on
a comparative basis, the first five high-
est men on the committees being pub-
lished each day in The Daily. Final in-
structions will be given all committee-
men at the general meeting at 8:30
o'clock tomorrow night in the assem-
bly hall of the Union. At this time the
prize will be announced which will be
awarded the solicitor who turns in the
largest number of subscriptions.
The committee is headed by Maynard
A. Newton, '22, general chairman, and
Frank McPike, '23, Lawrence D'Ooge,
assistant general chairmen. The cap-
tains of' the soliciting teams are as
follows: Frederick Weynard,'. '23,
George F. Perrin, '23, Wallace F. El-
liot, '22, Henry H. Hubbard, '23, Maur-
ice M. Moule, '23, Frederi'ck E. Gilner,
'24, Ralph L. Hagamier,. '23, Lyle S.
Hubbard, '23, Walter K. Scherer, '24,
Robert W. Preston, '24E, Edward C.
Stark, '24, Arthur Campbe'll, '24E, Ken-
neth Hoag, '24, William C. Valentine,
'23, Sigmund Kuntstadter, '22, Charles
F. Shearer, '24, George E. Sloan, '24L,
Joseph W. Crabbe, '23, will lead the
"flying squadron" and Harry A. S.
Clarke, '23, and Seth R. Bidwell, '24L,
respectively will head the alumni team
and the faculty team.
Saturday 's Games
Purdue 3, Northwestern 0.
Iowa 41, Minnesota 7.
Ohio State 7, Chicago 0.
Illinois 21, De Pauw 0.
Cornell 41, Columbia 7.
Syracuse 13. McGill 0.
Yale 28, Maryland 0.
Princeton 10; Harvard 3.
Nebraska 10, Pittsburgh 0.
Navy 6, Bucknell 0.
Notre Dame 28, West Point 0.
Colgate 41, Rochester 0.
Penn State 28, Carnegie Tech 7.
Brown 35, Monaventure 0.
Case 13, Mt. Union 7.
Ames 7, Drake 0.
M. A. C. 14, S. Dakota 0.

Figures Checked, Found Same
Those Announced; 9,350
on Campus

as

SECOND SEMESTER WILL RAISE
TOTAL TO MORE THAN 11,000
A careful check of the figures con-.
tained in the report on enrollment
announced by Registrar Arthur G.
Hall on Oct. 20 shows little variation,
which makes it probable that the fig-
ures as now announced will remain
comparatively stable for this year.
There are now 9,350 students on the
campus, according to -the report -of
Registrar Hall. This is a gain of
345 over last year, when the registra-
tion showed 9,005 students attending
the University. The number of un-
dergraduates decreased by 11 in the
College of Literature, Science, and
the Arts, which was covered .bygains
in other colleges. The Engineering,
Architecture, Pharmacy and Dental
colleges lost enrollment, while Med-
ics, Laws and Homoeops gained. The
summer school also gained 100 last
summer, making a'total enrollment of
1,300.
According to Registrar \Hall's latest
report the enrollment of the various
colleges are as follows: '
Colleges of Eng. and Arch. ....1,936
Medical school..................546
Law school ................... 375
College of Pharmacy............ 78
Homoeopathic Medical school... 63
College of Dental Surgery....... 396
School of Education ............ 259
Graduate school............. 428
Univ. Hops. Nurses Tr. school.. 163
Hom. Hosp. Nurses Tr. school... 34
It is also estimated that about 600
more will register the second semes-
ter, which will give an estimated to-
tal enrollment' of 11,222 for the year.
SHAWMS .PYGMALION" s
COEDYCLUB CKWCE

have a preliiinary meeting for a few
minutes.
Not only are these services which
will be held every following Monday
Nov. 14 to Dec. 12 in Lane hall open
to members of thet University but op-
portunity will be given to townspeo-
pie to attend, thus giving a wider
contact and enlarging the usefulness
of one of the University activities.
Several out-of-town people have also
signified their intentions of attend-
ing.
The staff of instructors includes sev-
eral of the best known campus and
city men. The opening session will
be in charge of Dr. W. A. Stalker, of
the Methodist church. Prof. Leroy
Waterman of the department of se-
metics will have the section on "The
Old Testament in the New". Mr. L.
A. Butler, superintendent of Ann Ar-
bor schools, will conduct the group.
on "The Principles of Teaching".
"Principles and Methods of Work with
Boys" will be the topic of H. C. Coff-
man. Prof. W. D. Henderson, head of
the University Extension service, will
take charge of the class on "Chris-
tian Ethics", Charles H. Griffitts, of
the psychology departmet, of the class
on "The Development of the Child and
Adolescent", and T. M. Iden of the
class on "Jesus' Philosbophy of Life".
Tickets for the banquet can be secur-
ed from all the churches or from H.
C. Coffman at Lane hall.
SANCTIONS CHANGES
IN 'ENSIAN MKAUP
Michigan's year book, for the first
time in its history, will undergo a de-
cided change in size and form.
This was decided at a meeting of
the Board in Control of Student Pub-
lications at their meeting yesterday.
Decided change in size and ar-
rangement of Michigan's year book
has significance, it is believed, for at
least two reasons.
The new book will be 9 by 12 inch-
es, instead 6f 8 by 11 inches, the pres-
ent size. The change will economize
space, with a resulting volume of less
bulk. It will also make possible the
more concise grouping of photographs,
illustrations, and the reading matter
accompanying them.
The new form will establish a prece-
dent in the style of college year books,
in the belief of this year's editors.

SOLDIER BONUS
BILL PROVOKES
LIVELYEBTE
MUCH DISCUSSION WILL DELAY
VOTE UNTIL MONDAY
NIGHT
TAX REVISION NEXT,
FOR CONSIDERATION
Senators Simmons, Walsh, La Follette
Take Floor During
Argument
(By Associated Press) -
Washington. Nov. 5. - The fight
over the soldiers' bonus was in full
swing tonight with so many senators
desiring to speak that there was
doubt that a final vote could be reach-
ed before Monday. The first proposal
taken up was that by Senator Reed,
Democrat, Missouri, to continue the
excess profits tax as a means of fi-
nancing the "five-way" adjusted com-
pensation plan. Senator Simmons, of
N. Carolina, and Senator Walsh, of
Massachusetts, Democrats, also were
prepared to offer their proposition to
pay the bonus out of the interest on
the foreign debt.
After the bonus issue is disposed of
leaders on both sides expect rapid
progress to be made on the tax revi-
sion bill with possible passage.-of the
measure Monday night. Debate on
the bill today was enlivened by an
attack on Secretary Mellon by Sena-
tr La Follette, Republican, Wisconsin,
and a 'descent on the treausry chief
by Senator Watson, Republican, In-
diana.
TEC HNIC MAKES FIRST
APPEARANCE TUESDA-Y
MAGAZINE CONTAINS STORIES OF
GENERAL AND PROFESSIONAL
INTEREST

MICHIGAN W INS
X-COUNTRY RACE
Lansing, Nov. 5.-Michigan defeated
M. A. C. in the annual five-mile grind
here this afternoon. Chute, of Mich-
igai, finished first in 24.40, Thurston,
of M. A. C., came in second. Adolph,
of M. A. C.,was third, and Arndt, of
Michigan, fourth. Bendel and Huston,
of the Aggies, came in fifth and sixth
respectively. Whittemore, Standish,
Bowen and Penberthy finished in the-
order named. The Reserves of the
Aggies defeated those of Coach Far-1
rell.
HOLMES ADDRESSES
SERV1IS TONIGHT
Drake University President Chooses
"Religious Education" as
Subject
NEW UNIVERSITY CHOIR WILL
PRESENT MUSICAL PROGRAM'
Dr. Arthur Holmes, president of
Drake university, Des Moines, Ia., will
be the speaker at the Union services
tonight in Hill auditorium. He has
chosen for his subject "A Religious
Education".
Dr. Holmes is a widely known psy-
chologist, having been an instructor in
that subject at the University ,of
Pennsylvania before becoming presi-
dent of Drake university. He has
written several, books upon the sub-
ject, the most popular of which are,
"Decay in Rtationalism" (1909); "Prin-
ciples of Character Making" (1913);
and "Backward Children" (1915). Dr.
Holmes is well known in Ann Arbor,
having been pastor of the Memorial
church from 1904 to 1905.rr
Tonight will be the first appearance
of the new University choir, under the
leadership of George Oscar Bowen of
the School of Music. Rev. J. B. Sil-
cox of the Congregational church will
conduct the scripture and prayer serv-
ices. Emerson Swart, '22E, will be
the presiding 'oflicer.
EXTRA CONCERT SERIES

MARSHAL FOCH TO
PAY BRIEF VISUT
HERE _TOMORRO
SPECIAL TRAIN BEARING PAR'
SCHEDULES FIVE-MINUTE
STOP
UNIVERSITY BODY WILL
GREET FRENCH GUES
Administrative Officers Draw Up
ficial Message of Welcome
to Visitor
The special Michigan Central tr
bearing Marshal Foch and his pa
will stop at Ann Arbor for five m
Ates Monday. Word to this effect -
received Saturday from Hon. Alton
Roberts, head of the American Leg]
committee in charge of entertainm
for the Marshal. The special tr
will leave Battle Creek about 9
and is due to arrive at Detroit
noon, sodthattalthough the exact ti
Is not 'known, it is expected to rei
Ann Arbor about 11 o'clock.
Classes Out
All classes and the administrat
offices of the University will be lo.
from 10 to 12 o'clock tomorrow mo
ing. The deans are asked to meet
the office of the President, and
faculty in the rear of the Law bu;
ing, or in case of rain in the Natu
Science auditorium. The student b
will assemble in front of Univeri
hall at 10:15 o'clock and d process
will be formed, headed by the ba
which will march to the Michigan C
tral station. The train will stop
east of the station, so as to ena
more people to get a good view of
Marshal, who will not leave
train.
Michigan Hero in Party
An official party, composed of
deans and other administrative
cers of the University, together v
Regent Junius E. Beal and the ma
of Ann Arbor, will welcome Mars
Foch, and present him with a par
ment inscribed with a message
greeting from the University.
Harold A. Furlong, '24M, Mi
gan's Medal of Honor man, will b
member of the Marshal's par'ty.
IBERT TO- LECTURE
ON FRENCH- POSITIOI

Comedy club will present Bernard
Shaw's "Pygmalion" as its annual'
play this year, the first of Shaw's
plays to be given in Ann Arbor. '
" "It is the most difficult play yet at-
tempted by the Comedy club, consid-
ering the demand on the actors,"
Prof. J. Raleigh Nelson stated yester-
day. "The cast chosen for the play
here is an all-star campus cast. Al-
most every member has made a mark
in campus dramatics. -Even the two
maids have had leading parts in pre-
vious plays of Masques."
The cast is as follows:
Eliza Doolittle, Mildred Henry, '22;
Hurz Higgins, John Herman, '23;.Col.
Pickering, Clement Smith, '23; Alfred
Doolittle, Richard Forsythe, '22; Mrs.
Pearce, Catherine Greenough, '23;
Mrs. Higgins, Mildred Chase, '22; Mrs.
Eyriesford Hill, Caroline Napier, '22;
Miss Eyriesford Hill, Christine Mur-
kett, '22; Freddy Eyriesford Hill, John
Hassberger, '23; bystanders, -Howard
Stimpson, '24, Wendell Hanselman,
'23, Charles Dresbach, '24; maids,
Joyce McCurdy, '22, Elizabeth Vick-1
ery, '22.
The first, meeting of the cast will
be held at 7 o'clock Wednesday eve-
ning in Barbour gymnasium. At that
time the parts will be given out and
study of the play begun.
Prof. Hall Speaks This Evening
Prof. Louis P. Hall of the Dental
school will be the speaker at the
Harris hall supper for Episcopal stu-
dents at 6 o'clock this evening. He
will tell of his trip to France, made
last summer as a representative of
the Rotary club,

"TipTop Star
Will Aid Shuterl
Ro'y Hoyer who is playing the lead
in Fred Stone's "Tip Top" now in its
14th week at the Colonial theater, Chi-
cago, will be in Ann Arbor today con-
fering with E. Mortimer Shuter regard-
ing the dancing in this year's Michigan
Union opera, "Make It For Two."
Mr. Hoyer will be at the Michigan
Union theater at least twice a week
from now until the production of the
show, leaving Chicago on the midnight
train, arriving here about7 o'clock in
the morning and leaving here at 1 to'
be back to play in his show that night.
Long years of experience have made
Mr. Hoyer the foremost juvenile danc-
er on the stage today. Heie s now in
his eighth season with Fred Stone,
having played the leading role in
"Chin Chin," "Jack o' Lantern," and
now in "Tip Top." His work is ex-E
ceptional in that he is one of the very
few men who produce their own
dances.
SCHEDULE OF STUDENT SPECIAL
TO WISCONSIN ANNOUNCED
The special train for the Wisconsin
game will leave the Michigan Central
depot in Ann Arbor at 9 o'clock next
Friday evening, arriving in Madison
at 8 o'clock Saturday morning. The
special will start its return trip at 11
o'clock that Saturday evening and will
arrive in Ann Arbor at 9 o'clock Sun-
day morning. Any one may stay over
in either Madison or Chicago provid-
ing that they leave Chicago on the
12:05 o'clock train which gets into
Ann Arbor at 7 o'clock Monday morn-
ing. The round trip fare is $19.74,
$4.86 for a lower Pullman berth, $3.89
for an uper berth, and $17.82 for a
drawing room.4

The Michigan Technic makes its
first appearance on the campus this
year in a new form Tuesday. With
the change in size to a larger maga-,
zine, many new features in set upr
and general appearance make it rank
with the first on the campus. The
slogan "A Journal of a Technical
College" is carried out in a series of
non-technical articles of popular as
well as professional interest.
J. T. N. Hoyt, chief structural engi-t
neer for Albert Kahn, has written an+
article on the "Nescience of Engi-
neering". "Lake Superior as a Mill
Pond" is the title of a feature told by
L. C. Sabin, '90E, a well known
Michigan engineer. Prof. Walter E.
Lay, of the mechanical engineering de-
partment, outlines the story of the
new automotive laboratory.
Three articles written by under-
graduates also feature, the authors
being William A. Cotton, Jr., '23E,
Bernard L. Beckwith, '21E, and George'
Gregory, '21E. William J. Hale of the
Dow Chemical company has also writ-
ten an article bearing on& industrial
chemistry.
DR. DANTZIG WILL
LECTURE MONDAY
"Anti-Friction Bearings" will be they
subject of the address to be given by
Dr. Dantzig, of New York City, at
7:30 o'clock tomorrow night in room
348 of the Engineering building. Dr.
Dantzig will lecture under the auspices
of the student branch of the American
Society of Mechincal Engineers. He
has been engaged for many years in
research and analytical engineering,
but has been more recently employed
in anti-friction problems both in the
laboratory and in the field. The lec-
ture is open to all who are interested.
'22 DENT CLASS APPOINTMENTS
TO COMMITTEES ANNOUNCEDI

The Detroit Symphony orchestra,
Ossip Gabrilowitsch, conductor, and
Estelle Liebling, sopranp solist, will
open the Extra concert series at 8
o'clock Tuesday evening ii Hill audi-
torium. This appearance will be the
first of five by the Detroit orchestra
and Ann Arbor patrons are looking
forward to it with much interest.
Deroit's orchestra is one of the
youngest great symphonies in the
country, btu it ranks among the
highest. Most great orchestras have
taken years to gain prestige. However,
under the direction of Mr. Gabri-
lowitsch and with the support of De-
troit music lovers, the orchestra has
made a sure and rapid progress to a
place with the few great American
orchestras.
Programs during the season have
been- announced as consisting of
brilliant and attractive music. They
will not be "high brow". Neither will
they be ",Jazz". They will consist of
good music of a tuneful nature such
as will interest the layman as well
as the professional.
Estelle Liebling with her unaffect-
ed stage appearance and her great
artistic assets is a singer who has
won universal approval. Her good
voice is easily and excellently pro-
duced, and in addition her serviceable
technical equipment and appreciation
of styles and types enables her to
present her numbers' with most cred-
itable results.
)IICHIGANEN$IAN ANNOUNCES
. NEW STAFF APPOINTMENTS

COMENUS TUESDAY
DETROIT SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
TO PRESENT FIRST OF
FIVE PROGRAMS

AT ARMS CONFEREN
"Fiance's Position in the Arn
ment Conference" will be. explained
Prof. Charles B. Vibbert, of the" p
losophy department, at 6:30 o'cl'
tonight in the Congregational chui
Professor Vibbert will show, fry
the standpoint. of French history, I
all of France today, from the
tre'he conservatives to the ultra-ri
icals, are all agreed on one point
that France must be granted milit
security and financial solvency. Mc
sieur Briand, the French represen
tive in the armament conference, a
demand these concessions, accord
to Professor Vibbert, and will t
far have the support of every polit
group in France, but he will b
much opposition from such pers
as Monsieur Poincare as to the m
ner in which he will seek to obi
these ends.
PROF. WHITE LEAVES FOR
CONFERENCE TOMORR
Prof. A. E. White, of the chem
engineering department and dire
of the department of engineering
search, leaves Monday for a serie
conferences in three Michigan ci
Monday evening he will speak be
the Jackson engineers, while on Tu
day he is scheduled for an all
conference in Detroit. On Wednes
he is called, into consultation at
City.

Centre college 55,
Kentucky 0.

University

of

The football manager had a hard
time arranging games in '96 due to
the demand of the smaller colleges for

Chairmen of the senior dent class
committees appointed recently are as
follows: social, F. C. Naylor; audit-
ing, C. L. Rothrock; finance, W. M.
Taylor; cap and gown, C. W. Wilson;
picture, R. E. Kleinesteker; memorial,
W. C. McBride; 'Ensian, R. W. Chris-
tie; announcement, G. R. Maitland.

The managing editor of the 1921-22'
Michiganensian wishes to announce
the following additional appointments
to the 'Ensian staff: Women's editor,
Athalie Hough, '22; athletic editor,
Thornton W. Sargent, Jr., '22; staff
photographer, George Stone, '22.

SENIOR NOTICE
Only 13 days left to have
'Ensian pictures taken. N
tension of time can be gra
Organization pictures only
to be taken during the mon
January.

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