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November 02, 1921 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-11-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Pr" iE MICHIGAN

DAILY

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ILLIARD FANS HAVE TREAT-TODAY WHEN.
SUTTON, ARMLESS WONDER, PLAYS HERE

VARSiTY STARTS ON .2 WEEKS GRIND
IN PREPARATION FOR THE BADGERS

George H. Sutton, the armless bil-
liard wonder will give two exhibitions
of his remarkable ability in the Union
billiard room today, one this afternoon
at 3:15 o'clock and another tonight
at 8:15 o'clock. Tom Shepard, '24, will
oppose him in the afternoon while
Harry Byrne, '23, will furnish the op-
position in the evening.
Although his arms are amputated
at the elbow, Sutton plays a wonderful
game, ranking with the best in the
country. Last January, Sutton made
a world's record in 18.2 balk line of

799, however this is not official as it
was made in regular game. At
straight rail he has made the high
run of 3009. Added to this he has a
large number of fancy shots at which{
he is most adept. Even though hisI
arms are severed at the elbow there
are few better billiard players in the
country than Sutton.
Chances on Wisconsin Trip given un-
til Tuesday P. M., Nov. 8. Arcade Bar-
ber Shop.-Adv.
Patronize our Advertisers.-Adv.

Wisconsin Has One of Strongest Teams
in History and Seeks Big Ten
Championship
KEEN COMPETITION CENTERS
AROUND BACKFIELD PLACES
Coach Yost has cut the string on his
bag of tricks and the .foolers which
are planned to put the skids on Wis-
consin and Minnesota are being hand-

ed out to the Varsity behind closed
gates. Not only are the Wolverines
absorbing all the strategy of foot-
balldom but they are using the ghost
ball in long drills after sundown.
There is but one thought among the
Varsity players and that is "beat Wis-
consin." The Badgerg undoubtedly
have one of the most powerful aggre-
gations "Jawn" Richards has ever
turned out and they are set upon

reaching the top of the Conference
adder, an achievement they have not
gained since their tie for honors in
1915.,
Settle Down to Grind
Fresh from its victory over Illinois,
Michigan has settled down to a twol
weeks grind before they meet the Bad-
gers at Madison. Michigan's victory
aver the Illini, while not overwhelm-
ing, raised the morale to a pitch where
it will be difficult for any team to down
the Wolverines. Michigan opened the
contest at Urbana-with all odds against
it. Only one experienced backfield
man, Steketee, was in the lineup, while
the line received a shakeup when Cap-
pon was pulled back from tackle to
halfback. Zuppke's men presented a
far stronger line-up than the one which
faced Wisconsin the previous week.
Peden, the fastest Illinois back, was
again in shape while Crangle opened
the game at full.1
Michigan's Strength Greater
Undaunted by injuries, the Wolver-
1 9 k5 a N L"3 n aM 1 a %
I, _-
'U
'U POCKET BILLIARDS U
'U
a Fourteen tables on see- U
aend floor reserved exclu-
sively for this sociable *
g game.
You do not need to be
an expert to enjoy it.
SIRsLTARDS CYGARlS CANDIES3
* PESLUNCHES 6 15
SnWe try to treat you r
M PIPES U~cHES OWN

0

(

ines pulled themselves together and
by the splendid work of Cappon and
Roby in punching the line, Steketee
with his educated toe, and the line In
outcharging the Illini, they were able
to outplay their opponents at all times
except for a brief period at the be-
ginning of the second half. The score
does not indicate the comparative play
of the two elevens. Michigan gained
10 first downs by. straight football as
against two for Illinois. Steketee gain-
ed about 70 yards in exchange of kicks
and was forced to kick one time less
than his opponent. On the same num-
ber of kicks, Stek had an advantage of
over 110 yards. Michigan's off tackle
plays and plunges through center net-
ted a total of 171 yards against 71 for
Zuppke's men. Michigan was weak in
passes and was not up to par in block-
ing. In the overhead attack Illinois
was able to complete half of its eight
attempts, for a total of 44 yards and
Michigan failed to complete a single
pass. Illinois also ran back punts
farther than the Michigan safety men
were able to. This was principally
due to the superior blocking of the
Indians.
Busy on Passing and Blocking
In these two departmentsof play,
passing and blocking, Coach Yost is
drilling his men intensively. He is
building a defense for the Badger pass-
es and against the Cardinal open field
work. Last night nearly all of the
men took part in a light workout.
Usher was out in uniform and took
part in as much work as his injured
leg will allow.' All of Yost's cripples
should be ready for action on Nov. 12
although Usher, Banks, Wieman, and
Neisch ~will be handicapped by lack
of rough work. This should not ser-
iously affect Usher and Banks. Uter-
itz and Banks are about on a par in
the matter of experience while Utz
has the advantage of having directed
the team against Ohio and Illinois.
With Cappon and Roby as likely fix-
tures in the backfield and Usher, Kip-
ke, Steketee, Banks, and Uteritz all
clamoring for a place there will be, a
lively battle for two weeks. To match
Elliott, Williams, Sundt, and Gould of
Wisconsin is Michigan's goal, and with
six sterling backs fighting for places
the Wolverine coach should be able to
turn out a quartette second to none in
the Conference.
NO IMPROVEMENT NOTED IN
EMPLOYMENT SITUATION HERE
No improvement has been shown
in the employment situation and a
number of men may have to leave
school on account of lack of funds
to carry them through, according to
data received from the University em-
ployment bureau. More me are look-
ing for positions this yearthan -ever
before. Some work is availble, how-
ever, in the form of odd jobs.
ANN ARBOR. SHOE REPAIRING
FACTORY. Bring your repairs and
save money by walking a block; next
to Ham's Lunch Room. 534 Forest
Avenue.-Adv.
TAKE AO tC
Rc.
'TAKE Gr oD CARM

YOU should not for one mo-
ment forget that your health
is worth more to you than all
the honors and wealth of the
world. Neglecting your plumb-
ing is neglecting your health.
Are all of your drains and pipes
working properly? If not, con-
sult us.
WM. HOCHREIN,
PLUMBER
Phone 525
211 South Fourth Avenue

./

THIRD ANNUAL

EXTRA CO.'NCERT SERIES
FIVE ATTRACTIVE ORCHESTRA CONCERTS
BY
THE DETROIT SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
OSSIP GABRILOWITSCH, Conductor
WITH A CELEBRATED SOLOIST AT EACH

'1,

ULE LIEBLING
Soprano

SCHEDULE OF DATES
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 8
ESTELLE LIEBLING
SOPRANO
MONDAY, DECEMBER 12
RAOUL VIDAS
VIOLINIST
MONDAY, JANUARY 23
OSSIP GABRILOWITSCH
PIANIST
MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20
HANS KINDLER
'CELLIST
MONDAY, FEBRUARY 27
BENDETSON NETZORG
PIANIST

TO THE PUBLIC
In response to many requests the University Musi-
cal Society has enriched the Extra Concert Series by the
inclusion of five orchestral programs at each of which a
gifted soloist will also appear. Obviously, an undertak-
mg of such magnitude involves heavy financial obliga-
tions. The Society hopes to make such a series an an-
nual event. In order to do this the enthusiastic support
of all who are interested in good music is invited; other-
wise it will not be possible to continue such an orchestral
series as an annual event. The prices of course tickets
have been placed at the lowest possible point to cover
expenses, and have been based on the assumption that the
auditorium will be entirely filled. Special attention is
called to the fact that the seats in the upper balcony
($2.00 and $3.00 for the course) are particularly desira-
ble for orchestral programs.

I

OSSIP GABRILOWITSCH
Conductor and Piano Soloist

SCHEDULE OF PRICES
Your attention is called to the fact that on the basis of the
admission to individual concerts ranges from as low as 40 cents to a
which bring good music within the reach of all.

course prices- given below the
maximum of one dollar, prices

$5.00 seats: Three center sections on the main floor and the first eight rows in the first balcony.
$4.00 seats: Two side sections on the main floor and the last seven rows in the first balcony.
$3.00 seats: First fourteen rows in the second balcony.
$2.oo seats: Last ten rows in the second balcony.
COURSE TICKETS are now on sale at the University School of Music.
CHARLES A. SINK, Secretary.

I

RAOUL VIDAS
Violinist

BENDETSON NETZORG
Pianist

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For Electrical
Repair Call the

Washtenaw

Electric Shop

Telephone 273
200 E. Washington

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