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November 02, 1921 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-11-02

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o.

THE WEATHER
FAIR AND COOLER
TODAY

Ar

4:3atl

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT W
SERVICE

VOL XXXII. No. 33 ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 2, 1921 PRICE FIVE CE

NATIONAL STRIKE
Of COAL MINERS
APPEARSLIKEILY
JUDGE ANDERSON'S INJUNCTION
IS IMPORTANT FACTOR IN
CONTROVERSY
UNION OFFICIALS FAVOR
WALK-OUT AS WEAPON

Failure of Conferences Results
Messages Sent Broadcast
to Workingmen

in

(By Associated Press)
Indianapolis, Nov. 1.-A nation wide
strike of coal miners seemed inevit-
able tonight if operators heer the in-
junction issued by Federal Judge A. B.
Anderson, whcih described the "check
off" of union views.
A telegram sent late today from
headquarters of the United Mine
Workers of America afted it had been
definitely learned that the injunction
was not yet in effect, advised union
officials to regard discontinuance- of
the "check off" as breaking the exist-
ing wage agreement.
Message Signed by Officers
The telegram signed by President
John L. Lewis, Vice-president Phil-
lip Murray and Secretary William
Green, said: "Any abrogation or set-
ting aside of any part or section of
this agreement, including the section
providing for the checking off of dues
and assessments cannot be regarded
as other than a violation of the agree-
ment and should be treated according-
ly by the district officers and local
unions."
While no cause of conduct for union
officials was outlined by the telegram,
it was said authoratively that the in-
ternational officers regarded the strike
as the union's only weapon to enforce
a contract.
Many States Affected
The states into which the massage
was sent were Pennsylvania, Ohio,
West Virginia, Illinois, Indiana, Mis-
souri, Kentucky, Michigan, Iowa, Kan-
sas, Oklahoma, Arkansas, Texas, Wy-
oming, Montana and Washington. The
message did not go to officials of the
three anthracite districts in Pennsyl-
vania or to partially organized' bitu-
minous districts, because the "check-
off" is not used there.
Dispatch of the message culminated
a seres of conferences between union
chiefs and councils that extended
throughout the day.
RICAU ILIGTION
TO CONFERENCE NAMED
FORMER SENATOR SUTHERLAND
MADE ADVISORY COMMITTEE
CHAIRMAN
Washington, Nov. 1. - President
Harding completed election of'the Am-
erican delegation to the armament
conference today by the appointment
of an advisory committee of 21 to act
with the four principal delegates, and
a technical staff of 34 to provide matter
and expert opinion on military, naval
and far Eastern questions.
George Sutherland, a former senator
from Utah and former president of the
American Bar association was design-
ated chairman of the advisory commit-
tee which will also number among
its members Sec. Herbert C. Hoover,
Gen. John J. Pershing, Rear Admiral
W. L. Rodgers, Pres. Samuel Gompers
of the American Federation of Labor
and Pres. Charles Barrett of the Farm-
ers' union. Four members of the com-
mittee are ;women.
tion largely as an informatio body
in connection with today's appoint-
ments but it was indicated that the
technical staff was intended to func-
tion largely as an informative body
while the advisory committee was de-
signed to give the four principal del-
egates the benefit of gneral council on
policy as well as a reflection of various
schools of public sentiment.
Nov. 12 Last Day for Senior Photos
Seniors have only 17 more days in
which to secure sittings at the pho-

tographers for pictures to be used in
the Michiganensian. The pictures are
due at the 'Ensian office not' later than
Nov. 18, so that no delay will be caus-
sAtIin th~a nmrh.nno n nanwrvn.. na.

VISITS CITIES ON
OPER'S ROUTE
Homer Heath, general manager of
the Union, left yesterday for a trip
through Ohio and Indiana to make ar-
rangements with Michigan alumni and
newspapers throghout the district for
the trip of the 1922 Union opera,
"Make It For Two". He will also
make final arrangements with the
theaters that will be visited during
the trip as to advertisements and the
necessary stage properties.
He will be in Lima, Ohio, today and
will visit Toledo, Indianapolis, Cleve-
land and probably Cincinnati before
returning Saturday.
INVITE DOCTORS TO
TE IN FRNCE
Profs. Warthin and Novy to Represent
University at Celebration in
Scientists' Honor
WORK OF PASTEUR WILL BE
COMMEMORATED AT STRASSBURG
Profs. A. S. Warthin and F. G.
Novy, of the Medical school, have
been invited to represent the Univer-
sity of Michigan at a celebration to e
held in May, 1923, by the city and
University of Strassburg, France, and
the Pasteur Institute in Paris. The
occasion is a centennial of the birth-
day of Louis Pasteur, the great
French scientist whose work has been
the basis of all knowledge of bacte-
riology and infectious diseases.
At this celebration in Strassburg a
monument to the memory of Pasteur
is to be dedicated. Contributions for
this monument will be collected from
all over the world. Anyone here wish-
ing to contribute should communicate
with Professor Warthin or Professor
Novy by Jan. 1, 1922.
In connection with the celebration
there will be an International Hygi-
enic Congress, at which Dr. Warthin
has been asked to give a resume of his
work on spirochaetes.
News of the Day
IN BRIEF
,
Washington, Nov.1-Flat charges by
Senator Watson, Democrat, Georgia,
that many American soldiers in the A.
E. F. had been hanged in France with-
out court martial or other trials stir-
red up a storm in the senate today
which resulted in the adoption by un-
animous vote for an order for an in-
vestigation at which the Georgia sen-
ator will be asked to present the truth
of his charges.
Kansas City, Nov. 1.-Marshal Foch,
General Diaz and Baron Jacques paus-
ed today in the midst of their activities'
at the American Legion convention to
celebrate an early morning mass in
the small private chapel at the resi-
dence of Bishop Thomas S. Lillis. Fol-
lowing the mass Bishop Lillis address-"
ed Marshal Foch: "You are the hero
of the world. Thousands will pay you1
tribute today but amidst it all you
have paused long enough to worship1
God."

Chicago, Nov. 1.--Marshal Foch,]
who will be Chicago's guest next Sat-
urday will witness his first football
game in America when he attends the
Ohio State-Chicago contest Saturday
afternoon as the guest of Pres. Harry
Pratt Judson of the University of Chi-
cago. Several boxes have been reserv-
ed for the Foch party which will be
escorted to the game by the ex-service
men of the university. The honorary
degree of Doctor of Laws will be con-
ferred on the French military leader.
QUARTERDECK WILL INITIATE '
TODAY IN ENGINEERING ARCH
Engineering arch, for years the fav-
orite ground for society initiations,
will be the scene of another cere-
mony at 4 o'clock this afternoon, when
Quarterdeck, marine engineering up-
perclass society, will initiate six men.
Following the ceremonies a banquet
will be held at 6:30 o'clock in the

PRESS CLUB HEARS
DETROITNEWS MEN'
Bingay, Editor, and Schoenfield, '18,
Special Writer, Speak Before
Meeting
DISCUSS FIRST REQUISITE.
FOR SUCCESS IN JOURNALISM

"SPECIAL" MAY BE
SENT TO MADISON
Negotiations for a special train to
the Wisconsin football game at Madi-
son Saturday, Nov. 12, are now being
carried on by Union officials and the
result of their attempts will be an-
nounced in a few days. At present
there are several roads that have of-
fered to transport the students to the
game at a reduced rate, and full ac-
commodations will be provided for all
who wish to make the trip if- a suffi-

ciently low rate
Qualities essential to the journalist The success of
were discussed by M. W. Bingay, man- nois last Saturda3
aging editor of the Detroit News, and for renewing nej
Alam Schoenfield, '18, special writer railroad compani
for the same paper, at the meeting of game way from A
the Students' Press club last night at accommodations r
the Union. way, according to
"There is no one way in preparing trip, and no diffil
for newspaper work any more enced at any tim
than there is any one way in pre- company or Mich
paring for life," Mr. Bingay stated in train.
characterizing the preparation that a,
man must have to write for the news-
papers. "The journalist must have
th e fundamental elements that STUDENT
make for success in other e elds -
morality, decency, and understand-
ing."' SE KSH
Mr Binza didt not onninA himself

is procurable.
the special to Illi-
y is the chief reason
gotiations with the
es for the second
nn Arbor. Excellent
were provided all the
those who made the
culties were experi-
ne with the railroad
igan students on the
OP RETURN

Sophomores interested in
work on the business staff of
The Michigan Daily may apply
to the business manager during
the remainder of this week.
Anyone interested in copy writ-
ing may also apply. Freshmen
on the campus are not eligible
at this time.

} 1

CAMPUS THEATER PLANS EVOLVED
AF4TER TWO, YEARS O-F WORK; COST
LIKELY TO APPROXIMATE 8400,00

BUSINESS TRYOUTS 74AY
APPLY

COMMITTEE EXAMINES PLANS I
OTHER COLLEGE SHOW
HOUSES
TWO AUDITORIUMS
INCLUDED IN SKETCHI
Would be Ample to Take Care of A
Michigan Productions; Sketches
Provide for Details

o . n efg yeld
to any one field

in the journalist's

work, but touched upon all of the va-
rious phases. His talk was a general
outline of the things that must be
recognized when the beginner starts
out in the work.,
Cynicism Explained
He spoke of the cynicism of the
majority of newspaper men and de-
clared that much of this was caused
because of the fact that the journal-
ist so oftentimes "sees behind the
scenes" in the political and social life
of the world. He also depicted the ex-
periences in meeting men of affairs,
sometimes in the most informal man-
ner.
In concluding Mr. Bingay spoke of
the moral el'ement in journalism,
stating that the beginner in the field
should get on a paper with a good
moral tone and should then stick to
its principles. He also declared that
the personnel of the paper, largely in
this way, was the factor that gavet
the paper its moral standpoints.
Interviewer Must Conform
Mr. Schoenfield outlined the workf
of the interviewer, and presented nu-,
merous side-agis in tnat field of the
profession. He characterized the
work of interviewing as the most fas-t
cinating of the entire game. He
enumerated the qualities that were
essential to the man who interviews,
as: breadth of knowledge, ability toj
approach and win the confidence of7
the man to be interviewed, unfailingt
accuracy, keen news sense, and ability
to convey impressions. Many of these,
he pointed out, primarily essential to
any division of the newspaper field,
were particularly applicable to inter-
viewing.
Exclusive Angles Important
"Watch for the unusual slants,",
Mr. Schoenfield said. "There is a
stereotyped kind of interview which
should be avoided. What is desired is
something which has not been written
in the numerous previous interviews1
with the man."
The meeting of the ,Press club at
which approximately 100 were pres-
ent was held shortly after a buffet
luncheon. The next meeting of the
club will be held Nov. 15, at which{
time A. W. Stace, managing editor of
the Grand Rapids Press, and A. Har-
rison, district business manager of1
the United Press association, will
speak.
FRESHMAN LITS,
BOLLOT TODAY
Freshman lits will ballot for class
officers between the hours of 9 and 3
o'clock today in the corridor of Uni-1
versity hall, opposite the registrar's
office. This election was to have been
held Monday, but was postponed when'
it was discovered that one of the
nominees was ineligible to hold office.
The list of nominees is as follows:
President, Richard Laurence and
Thomas Yutzy; vice-president, Ruby
Green and Alice Powell; secretary,
Jeane Briggs and Ardys Stoner; treas-
ure, D. E. Johnson and J. G. Lamo-
ree.
Evans Appears In Twilight Series
Harry Russell Evans of the organ
faculty of the School of Music, will
give the next program in the Twilight
organ series at 4:15 o'clock tomorrow

Revised Plans To Be Presented
Committee on Student
Affairs

to

GROUP IS APPOINTED TO CON-
FER WITH DEAN BURSLEY
Steps designed to bring about the
restoration of the J-Hop were taken
by the Student Advisory committee at
its regular meeting yesterday after-
noon. A sub-committee consisting of
Douglas Dow, '22E, chairman, C. M.
Atkinson, '22, Thomas I. Underwood,
'23L, and Perkins Bull, '23, was ap-
pointed to act with Dean Joseph A.
Bursley.{
Suggest New Rules
This committee will proceed to
draw up a set of revised regulations
for the Hop and house parties and al-
so a plan for the enforcement of the
regulations, which they will present
to the Student Advisory conmittee
and to the Junior classes of the Uni-
versity for amendment or approval,
as soon as possible. The final report
will be submitted to the Senate com-
mittee on student affairs with a re-
quest for the return of the Hop under
the revised plan. 0.
Other Bodies Interested
Besides the Student Advisory com-
mittee, the Student council and the
junior law, lit, and engineer classes
have all gone on record as favoring:
the return of the Hop.
UNION MUICAL CUBS
ANT SPECIALTYIACTS
SEVERAL MORE MEN NEEDED TO
COMPLETE PERSONNEL OF
MANDOLI\ CLUB
Specialty acts for the fall Glee and
Mandolin club concert are now being
sought by the club, and Gordon F.
Godley, '22E, manager, has announced
that all men who have acts, skits,
sketches or stunts are asked to re-
port at 4:30 o'clock today in room 308
of the Union to try out.
Concerning the poster work for the
concert, it was announced that one
more chance will be given for men
who wish to do this work. They are
asked to come at 5 o'clock today to
room 308 with sketches. All men who
previously tried out are expected to
be present at that time with the work
they were to have ready.
The Mandolin club is practically se-
lected, it was announced, but a few
more guitars are needed to complete
the personnel. Men who can play a
guitar are asked to come to room 308
at 4:30 today.
COMMITTEES APPOINTED BY
JUNIOR MEDICS YESTERDAY
Social, finance and auditing commit-
tees were appointed yesterday morn-
ing at a meeting of junior medic of-
ficers. The social committee is James
W. Halfhill, Howard C. Walser, John
H. Labadie, Clarence W. Hardy and
A. Dale Kirk. The finance and audit-
ing committees are Arthur F. Heyl,
Theodore I. Bauer and James W.
Townsend. The "Brown Derby" com-
mittee is Charles A. McNeil, Stewart
IE. Doolittle, Harold W. Riggs, John

SEATS SELLING RAPIL
FOR MINNESOTA EAM
SENIORITY PREFERENCE WILL'
NOT BE OBSERVED AFTER
NEXT WEDNESDAY
Approximately 3,000 students have
not filed their applications for tickets
to the Minnesota game, according to
officials in the athletic office who have
charge of the distribution.
Ticket orders are being received
in about the same numbers that they
were received for the Ohio State
game, and the indications are that the
entire stands will soon be sold. Un-
til next Wednesday the orders will be
received and filed in accord with the
class preference rule. After that
time they will be filed in order, irre-
spective of campus seniority.
The disregard of the warning issued
previous to the Ohio State game,
caused a few of the tardy individuals
to lose out on their reserve seats, and
they were forced to see the game from
the standing room, at the east end of
the gridiron.
lirectories Sell
Fat irst Day
Fast Fl
Student directories sold like the
proverbial hot cakes yesterday and at
6 o'clock last night most of the little
red-bound information catalogues had
been disposed of. There were 2,500
directories printed and more than
2,300 of these have already been sold.
The last 125 offered to the public will
be placed on sale in front of the Li-
brary between 11 and 12 o'clock this
morning.
COMMITTEES NAMED
IN SOPH MEETING'
Announcement of sophomore lit
committees was made yesterday after-
noon in Mason hall. The meeting of
the sophomore lits was presided over
by Harry Kipke, president, who urg-
ed that all sophomores be present at
every meeting in order to make it
possible for the class to carry on their
various functions.
It was announced also that class
dues are payable at once. The sopho-
more soccer team will begin practice
Friday. Plans were discussed for a
soph mixer to be held before Christ-
mas.
The following members of the class
were appointed to committees: social
committee, Mary Hayes, Dorias Kraus,
Clyde Verkerke, Morris Robinson,
Carlton Hill, Donald Steketee, Mo-
reau Crosby; auditing committee, G.
E. Tappan, Kenneth Kerr; financial
committee, James Prentice, Robert
Wilkins; publicity committee, Joseph
Sterling, Hai'ry Clark, Russell Thorn-
quist; athletic comnittee, William1
Merner, William Weeks, William Hat-
tendorf.
PRESIDENT BURTON LEAVES
TOMORROW FOR ST. LOUIS
President Marion L. Burton and
Mrs. Burton will leave tomorrow for
St. Louis, Mo., where the President
will address the Missouri State Teach-
ers' association on Friday. From St.
Louis they will go to New Orleans
where Dr. Burton will speak before
the National Association of State Uni-

A real University theate, containing
within its walls facilities for all cam-
pus productions, large and small, and
giving Michigan a commanding posi-
tion in educational . dramatic work
aniong all the universities of the coun-
try, is the aim of the theater commit-
tee, a branch of the Campus Dramatie
association, which has been working
on plans for the structure for the last-
two years.
It will cost a sum well in excess of
$400,000 to develop the sketches that
have already been made by the com-
mittee, of which Prof. J. Raleigh Nel-.
son, of the English department, is
chairman. The funds will all be rais-
ed by private donation and nothing
is expected by grant from the state.
Michigan May Be First
If the present sketches are evolved
into a complete architectural plan and
actual construction work started with-
in the next two years, as is expected,
Michigan will be the first university
in the country to build a large, modern
theater, fully equipped for college
dramatics on a large scale.
Moved by the inadequacy of all the
University auditoriums for dramatic
productions of any complexity, the
Campus Dramatic association two
years ago appointed the committee
that has announced tentative plans for
the project, naming Professor Nelson
chairman, and Prof. J. F. Shepard, of
the psychology department, Prof. R.
D. T. Hollister, of the oratory depart-
ment, and Prof. H. A. Kenyon, of the
romance languages departmenit, the
other members.
- Otihr Colleges Surveyed
Since that time the members of the
committee have investigated the needs
of a campus theater at Michigan and
the successful ventures at other Am-
erican colleges at every opportunity.
A large number of workshops on a
smaller scale than the one planned
here have been worked out at various
places, most notable of which are the
Harvard Workshop 47 and the Vassar
Workshop. But a laboratory theater,
intended primarily for instruction of
University students in the arts and sci-
ence of the drama, involves the devel-
opment of plans that will be in them-
selves a contribution to the technique
of the stage.
Two auditoriums are contained in
the tentative plans that have sbeen
submitted to a Detroit architect and
are being worked out. The larger au-
ditorium could be used for the la'ger
student productions, such as the Mich-
igan Union operas, the Junior and
Senior Girls' plays, and the annual
plays of the Comedy club and Masques.
It might perhaps be suitable for lec-
tures and concerts, or operas by pro-
fessional companies for which Hill
auditorium is too large or inadequate.
For All Productions
The small auditorium would be use-
ful for trial performances of original
plays by students and faculty, for ex-
perimental class work, and for the
smaller plays of the Comedy club,
Players club, and Masques. Both
stages would be completely equipped
for individual performances, but the
same dressing and property rooms
could serve both. In addition a num-
ber of rooms would be provided for
rehearsal and administrative purposes.
The University Dramatic societies
that are interested in the plans of the
Campus Dramatic association are the
Comedy club, Players club, Mimes,
French, club, Masques, Spanish club,
Classical club, Junior Girls' play, Or-
atorical association, and Senior Girls'
play.
Sigma Delta Chi Rfeetng Postponed
digma Delta. Chi will meet tomor-

row night instead of this evening, in
room 306 of the Union. The meeting
was postponed because no room could

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