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November 01, 1921 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-11-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FF.,CTIVE OCT. 10, 1921
,al Standard Time
P.M. A&PM
Daily Daily
Adrian...Ar 7:00 12.45
Tecumseh6...6:2512:
Clinton-......6:05 1:5,
Saline. . 5:15L:.0
Ann Arbor Lv. 4:45 10:3a
P.M. A&PMj
Read Up
SAND HOLIDAYS
P.M.
*Adrian ..Ar 9:00
Tecumseh .... 82
Clinton ... 8:05
Saline 7:15
Ann Arbor Lv. 6:45
P.M.

START IT RIGHT
7:30 Breakfast
12:00 Lunch
6:00 Dinner
END IT RIGHT
LUNCH AT THE
STUDENT LUNCH
409 EAST JEFFERSON

ANN ARBOR DAIRY CO.

you looking for good,
)lesome butter, cheese,
and cream?

clean,
milk,

THAT'S US

IE HOME OF PURE MILK
TELEPHONE 423

-4

~EANERS
P --AND ~
PRESSERS
29W XWASNINUTON

P.
E
S
I
N
G

DIVISION OF STUDENTS
ACCORDING TO ABLITY
PRBBEINNOVTION
PROFESSOR PILLSBURY CITES
EXAMPLES OF SATISFAC-
TORY RESULTS
(By Delbert Clark)
With the improvement of methods in
teaching has arisen the question of
intellectual segregation: dividing stu-
dents according to mental ability. The
idea, has not, to any great extent,
been put into practice. Of late, mental
measurements have been widely talk-
ed of, and tried out with varying de-
grees of success, partly due to vary-
ing conditions, and partly to differ-
ences in methods of administering the
tests. Such tests were made in the
Ann Arbor high school last year, and
in one. ward school actual segrega-
tion took place. Not the least im-
portant venture in this field was made
last year at Michigan when all stu-
dents who were placed on probation
at the end of the first semester were
required to take what was popularly
termed an "intelligence test." The
idea of the test was to ascertain to
what extent poor work and low-grade
intellect went together.
Segregation in Romance Languages
In the romance language depart-
ment actual segregation has taken
place to a limited degree. At the
opening of each semester every stu-
dent electing French or Spanish is
required to state how much language
he has previously stuided, and his
average grade. He is then assigned
to a section accordingly. Certain sec-
tions are theoretically composed of
students who learn languages with
facility, others not so advanced, and
still others further down the scale.
During the semester, if a student
shows himself unfitted for the section
in which ,he has been placed, he is
transferred to one better suited tohis
ability. The obvious flaw in this plan,
according to its chief advocates, is
the fact that high school teachers vary
to such a degree in their standards of
grading. A student receiving an aver-
age grade of 90 per cent may have
no greater ability than one from an-
other high school with a recorded
grade of 70 or 80 per cent.
"Results Satisfactory"
In cases of actual mental examina
tion and segregation observed, accord-
ing Prof. Walter B. Pillsbury, of the
psychology department, satisfactory
results have been obtained. Students
of marked ability when segregated
have covered in two semesters the
work of three, without being worked
beyond their capacity. On the other
hand,. the students in lower sections
have not had the presence of a few
brilliant ones to discourage them, and
have brought their work up to normal.
It is well-known that in mixed classes,
those students who have marked abili-
ty are often neglected, it being taken
for granted that they will sua volun-
tate do the work required, while those
who are backward and learn wit
difficulty !receive a disproportionate
amount of attention. "The one danger
to be avoided," said Professor Pills-
bury, "is that of allowing the poor
student to become aware that he is
considered backward. If this happens,
the plan is spoiled, and much harm
may be done to the individual. Di-
vision should be made without the
students themselves knowing the
reason."
The best plan for instituting the
system in colleges seems to be thai

of a test given to students before they
leave high school, when it is known
that they are going to enter college,
A questionnaire, prepared by the state
university, is sent to the high schoolE
of- the state, and the students are re-
quired to answer the questions off-
hand. Their answers are graded first
by their teachers and then at the uni-
versity, and on their entrance they
are classified accordingly.

BLU MAIZE BLOSSOM SHOP
OPENS NEW BRANCH STORE
The BluMaize Blossom shop had a
formal opening, of its new branch
store last night at 213 East Liberty
street, under the direction of its own-
ers, W. S. Wells and Daniel F. Vollmer,
'21. Mr. Vollmer has studied under
Max Schling, of New York City and:
Charles Uttley, of Harrisburg, Pa.,
both of whom are American floral
artists.
Patronize our Advertisers.-Adv.
Daily Want Ada Pay.-Adv.
PARCEL
DELIVERY

EBERBACH &.SON CO.
200-204 East Liberty Street

TELEPHONE
2700
TRUNKS
'N EVERYTHING

Laboratory Supplies

y

1

Drugs and Toilet Specialties

evening at Newberry hall. Dean Myra,
B. Jordan will talk. s
(Continued on Page Seven)

Es.CAN4 Es
STEAM 6 GAS FITTING
TELEPHONE 21410Fl

-4

STUDENTS SUPPLY STORE
UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT

Chemicals

Engineers and Architects Materials.

Stationery

Fountain Pens.

Pennants and Blankets

Laundry Agency

Morse and Gilberts Chocolates

Eversharp Pencils

r

628

REPAIRING

' ,
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...., - j
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XMAS MORNING

when the folks. are all coming
home to spend the day with you
and you are anxious that every-
thing go well, will your plumb-
ing and heating be in good con-
dition or will you have to have
plumbers tinkering and fixing at
the last minute?
TTER LET US FIX YOU UP NOW!
BERANEK & MARTIN
2452 320 N. MAIN ST.

moxmmxw.

hi

Service

That Saves

Cleaning and pressing at our establishment does
more than improve the appearance of your garment

Swissilizing

Takes out the grit and sand that wear out the fabric

Overcoat
Acrd its high time you were

Time
fitted in one of

Energine

Is free from all mineral oils, nothing remains in the
fabric after going through our process.
SWISSILIZED GARMENTS STAY CLEAN LONGER

The Home
n rin 0

Ga r n t G
Com aany.
L

omen
All women who have been warned
or are on probation are requested to
see Dean Myra B. Jordan at once.
Sigma Delta Phi will meet at 12
o'clock today at the Dey studio for
the, Michiganensian picture.
Rehearsal of the University Girls'
Glee club will be held at 4:30 o'clock
this afternoon in Newberry hall, in-
stead of Barbour gymnasium.
There will be a meeting of the'
Junior Girls' playl committee at 4
o'clock this afternoon at the Delta
Gamma house.

The Wonderful Coats We are Offering at

$20 - $25-$30 - $35- $45 - $50

JE uertA.

FASHION PARK CLOTHES

)NE 2508

0-1

',

Mi

Dames will meet this

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