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October 30, 1921 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-10-30

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

a_ *
-OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY
OF MICHIGAN
Pulished every morning except Monday during the Univer-
sity year by the Board in Control of Student Publications.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use for
republication of all news dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
credited in this paper and the local news published therein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
class matter.
Subscription by carrier or mail, $3.5.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press building, Maynard Street.
Phones: Business, g6o; Editorial, 2414.
Communications not to exceed 300 words, if signed, the sig-
nature not necessarily to appear in print, but as an evidence of
faith,, and notices of events will be published in The Daily at the
discer-tion of the Editor, if left at or mailed to The Daily office.
Unsigned communications will receive no consideration. No man-
usript will be returned unless the writer incoses postage.
r The Daily does not necessarily endorse the sentiments ex-
pressed in the communications.
"What's Going On" notices will not be received after 6 o'clock
on the evening preceding insertion.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
MANAGING EDITOR .......... BREWSTER P. CAMPBELL
Assistant Managing Editor...............Hugh W. Hitchcock
City Editor............................... P. Lovejoy, Jr.
Night Editors-
M. B. Stahl G. P. Overton
R. E. Adams Hugston McBain
Paul Watzel Edward Lambrecht
F. H. McPike
Editorials..T. J. Whinery, L. A. Kerii, S. T. Beach, E. R. Meiss
Sunday Magazine Editor ..........................T. S. Sargent
Sporting Editr.............................. George Reindel
Women's Editor..........................Elizabeth Vickery
.Humor Editor. ................................ E R. Meiss
Assistants
- Harry B. Grundy John Dawson Ben H. Lee, Jr.
Wallace F. Elliott Sidney B. Coates JulianHMack
-M. A. Klaver L~owell S. Kerr Howard Donahue
Dorothy Whipple H. E. Howlett Ar>old Fleig
Marion Koch Katherine Montgomery
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
BUSINESS MANAGER .............VERNON F. HILLERY
Advertising.......................F. M. Heath, A. J. Parker
Publication............................Nathan W. Robertson
Accounts ................................. John J. Hamels, Jr.
Circulation ................................. Herold C. Hunt
Assistants
Burr L. Robbins Richard Cutting H. Willis Heidbreder
W. Cooley James Prentiss W. Kenneth Galbraith.
L. Beaumont Parks Maurice Moule . A. Dryer
Walter Scherer Martin Goldring Richard Heidemann
Edw. Murane Tyler Stevens T. H. Wolfe
Persons wishing - to secure information concerning news for
any issue of The Daily should see the night editor, who has full
charge of all news to be printed that night.
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 1921.
Night Editor-PAUL WATZEL
WISCONSIN NFXT!
Yesterday afternoon Michigan staged one of the
most glorious "come-backs" in her history, when
she won against her old rivals, the Illini, on a
muddy, slimy field. The fact that the game was won'
by only a small margin counts for little. We won,
we won fairly in straight football, and we won
against a most capable foe.
The showing made at Urbana was one worthy in
every way of a Michigan team, a Michigan coach,
and a Michigan crowd. We have two games to go,
and the prospect of a truly excellent record at the
end of the season, despite our first loss and the
howls that arose immediately following. - How
about it?
The O. S. U. game is over and done. Forget it!
Illinois has bowed her head to us. Wisconsin is
next. Make it big!

THE UNIVERSITY CHOIR
Music is almost as indispensable to religious
services - being nearly as much needed as the
speaker or the audience. Congregation singing is
nearly as old as Christianity itself and of recent
years it has been growing rather than waning in
favor. There seems to be something in the soul of
man that can be expressed only through music.
The Union Sunday evening programs, begun two
years ago to provide student services for the entire
campus, have alway§ carried essentially strong mus-
ical offerings. Artists from the Schol of Music,
church choirs and quartettes from Detroit, and oc-
casional mass singing by the Choral Union have
left little more to be desired as regards this portion
of the programs.
This year a choir of a hundred voices is being
organized among students for the express purpose
of providing music for these occasions. George Os-
car Bowen of the School of Music has been secured
as director.
As a means toward making the services more
completely "by and for the students", the plan
marks a forward step. Through it two of the
three essentials of the religious meeting will come
from undergraduates. By taking a larger part in
the program, the campus should develop a corre-
spondingly larger interest and concern in its suc-
cess.
Some fifty persons have already signified their
intention of joining the chorus. Although the new
organization will have a hard time excelling the mu-
sic of past years, there is little doubt that it can
make the proper showing if a sufficient number of
good voices can be secured. There are on the
campus more students with musical ability than the,
quota desired, and there should be no hesitancy on
their part to volunteer.
Where is the "Police Gazette which used to oc-
cupy the position of honor in every barber-shop?
Now the "Saturday Evening Post" and Leslies
adorn the tonsorial emporiums. Evidently the
American male is growing better.
Collections are in order for Canadian bootleg-
gers. It is said that they are in such straights that
they are taking nickles and dimes left out in milk
bottles.
In compliance with our request, practically every
inquiry as to the game yesterday came over our
business phone. Thanks! This courtesy was appre-
ciated.

Log Log Slide Rules
AT
GRAHAM'S
Bloth ends of the diagonal baalk

li

SII

DETROIT UNITED LINES
Ann Arbor and Jackson
TIME TABLE
Derit(atern Standard Time)
DetroitLimited and Express Cars-6.o a.
n., 7:05 a. in., 8:io. a. m. and hourly to 9:io
p. m.
Jackson Express Cars (local stops of Ann
Arbor), 9:48 a. in. and every two hours to
9:48 p. m.
Local Cars East Bound-- 5s: a.m., 7:o a.
m,. and every two hours, to 9 :oo p. in..ixi :oo
P. i. To Ypsilanti only-i: :40 p. m., 12.25
a. in., r:15 a. m.
To Saline, change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars West Bound-7:5o a. M., 2:40 p.
in.
To Jackson and Kalamazoo-Limited cars:
8:48, 10:49 a. M., 12:48, 2:48, 4:48.
To Jackson and Lansing-Limited: 8:48
P. in.

J

If
if

you
or

are hungry,

you are
or

thirsty,

1921

OCTOBER

S
9
16
23

0
10
17
24
31

4
11
18
25

5
12
19
26

6
1s
20
27

14
21
28

1921
1
8
15
20.
29

NOTICE TO MEN
We do all kinds of high-class Hat
work at pre-war prices. Hats turned
inside out, with all new trimmings,
are as good as new.
FACTORY HAT STORE
617 PACKARD STREET
Telephone 1792
HOLLAND EDUCATOR
TO LECTURE HERE
Prof. A. J. Barnouw, of Holland, who
is traveling in this country as a rep-
resentative of the Dutch government,
will give three lecturers here this
week under the auspices of the Uni-
versity. Subjects provisionally select-
ed for the addresses are: "Holland
During the Reformation," "Dutch Col-
onial Expansion," and "Contemporary
Dutch Literature." The lectures will
be given at 4:16 o'clock Nov. 3, 4, and
5, in Natural Science auditorium.
Professor Barnouw will be a Univer-
sity lecturer next semester at Colum-
bia university. His presence in the
United States is a part of a larger plan
fostered by the academic institutions
of the world to bring scholars of dif-
ferent nationalities in touch with each
other.
Michigan students heard Professor
Barnouw when he lectured here in the
spring of 1920.
Don't forget to pay your Daily sub-
scription.--Adv.

If you just need a friend,
Drop in at that friendly place.
TUTTLE'S LUNCH ROOM
I Just Told Vera
that after we got married she would
have to bake our own pies and cakes
because I was sick and tired of eating
these bakery pies that you get around
town. And Vera, can bake pies too.
You just ought to taste some of them.
You never see anything like it around
here except -,well, yes you do to, over
-,.,...AT
Flowers Restaurant
32,STEPS FROM STATE ST.
But they are an exception anyhow - you
know they make all their own pies and cakes

"Oh man ! Dutchess Trousers, $2.95"
clothing adv. It won't be long before this
name will be too confusing to be of much use.

reads
trade

Thse Telescope

The Difference
When spEaking./of
The ladies fair,
Two peaches make
A perfect pair.

A MENTAL EXCHANGE
The question of how to bring about a closer per-
sonal contact between students and faculty, in the
interests of a broader education for the individual
undergraduate, has already been raised. In the
past some steps have been taken toward a solution
of the problems, with varying results. For exam-
ple, certain faculty members -have taken it upon
themselves to invite the members of their classes to
their homes early each year, but this scheme has
proved only partially satisfactory. The practice can-
not very well be continued throughout the year, and
in the case of very large classes it is obviously out
of the question. So these attempts, laudable in
themselves, are of rather doubtful value.
What is probably the best-working plan for
bringing faculty and students together on the same
plane is one which was put into practice on the
campus on a- small scale last year ; it can best be
presented by a description of its salient features. At
least one group of men students met regularly once
a week with a well-known professor. There was no.
organization, no formality - only a sociable eve-
ning, sans restraint, sane refreshments. The custom
met with such favor among the members of the
group that they would often forego other engage-
ments in order to attend this weekly gathering.
Everyone concerned, including the professor him-
self, is said to have been highly gratified with the
results.
There is no valid reason why a number of these
circles should not be formed on the campus. Let a
few students whose interests are similar get to-
gether with some faculty member who can best
sympathize with their ideas and aspirations, and at
intervals meet informally for an evening of mutual
enjoyment. There are enough really big men on the
faculty, with a sufficiently wide range of activity,
to put the thing across, provided the students are
actively interested.
The project is not one that can be undertaken
with a whoop-hurrah and a pep meeting: it is a
matter necessitating individual and group, not mass
interest. But if faculty and students are as inter-.
ested in the solution of this problem as they seem
to be, this year should see a number of such circles,
and the results in the long run will be such as have
long been dreamed of, but never yet seen here to

But poker hands
Are different each,
Two pairs don't always
Make a peach.
NEWS ITEM: -No difficulty in sleeping while
sitting up was experienced by the Ann Arbor boys
on their special train, as their lecture courses have
given them considerable experience in this field.

The Rolling Stone
Much have I traveled; much I know;
And yet, methinks the world would be
Improved if modern girls would show
Less legs and more efficiency.

-I

I

-_

Vee

Our Latest Song Entitled:
"The Dentist Is an Awful Grind."
R

Dee.
ope.

Clothes for You
at economy Prices
MjOST students are willing to practice
economy in clothes buying if they can
still be well dressed. Which explains why
so many buy most of their clothes here.

We Agree
There once was a nut from Dupree,
Who built him a house in a tree,
And said, "H. C. L.
Can go straight to L.
For I'm living high cheaply, you see."
-0. Y. Knott.

We've

taken garments that have been

It's hard to believe that there is free speech in
this country after you look at a telephone bill.
Truth Is Stranger
"A paradox you'll find in life
Is this," said Samuel Gupp,
"To forward any movement
You will have to back it up."
Professor in Journalism: Two people say they
haven't read the Arbuckle case yet - so they say.
The Gambler's Wooing
The dealer bid his single heart
{ And his partner showed disgust,
Then opponent raised them one in spades
And the partner passed his thrust;
But the dealer pressed on with his suit
While his partner fumed and cussed,
"If he only, only, only knew
That I have a perfect bust."
Famous Closing Lines
"I've met my match," breathed the cigarette, all

worn -- some of them only slightly - and
put them through our process of thorough
steaming, cleaning and repairing so that
they look like new and will give long serv-
ice.
Fine Winter Overcoats p riced
as low as $3.50. Others to $15
Opposite Court House on Fourth

1'I

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