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October 29, 1921 - Image 12

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-10-29

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PAGE FOUR.

THE MICHIGAN

DAILY SATU A' , OCTOBER .29, 19 1

PAGE POUR THE MICHIGAN DAILY SATURDAY, OCTOBER '2~, 1921

I 1

CARRIES PLAN TO
REITERATE DEMAND
FOR NEW WAGE CUTI
DECLARE STRIKE SETTLEMENT
WILL NOT AFFECT PLAN
ANNOUNCED OCT.14
600 TEXAS EMPLOYEES
STILL AWAY FROM WORK
Labor Board Expected to Render
Decision for Wednesda Hearing
Tomorrow
(By Associated Press)
Chicago, Oct. 28. - Railroad heads
tonight declared the nation's carriers
would go right ahead with their
plans to seek new wage cuts through
Railway Labor board hearings. This
will be done despite the announce-
ment of the unions that their action
in calling off the strike, scheduled for
Oct.. 30, had been influenced by the
board's announcement that a pay re-
duction petition for any class would
not be considered until working con-
ditions for that class had been set-
tled.
Seek Wage Reduction
"The calling off of the strike will
have no effect on the plans announc-
ed by the carriers, Oct. 14, to seek
immediate wage reduction so that
rates could be reduced," said Samuel
Felton, president of the Chicago
Great Western and president of the
Association of Western Railroad Ex-
ecutives. "I don't know how long it
will take to reach a decision on any
pay cut petition,but these petitions
will be presented in a very short
time. It will be up to the board then
to decide when action will be taken.'
Mr. Felton's statements were echoed
by Samuel Dunn, editor of Railway
Age, who in an address at a luncheon
of the local railroad executives, de-
clared that "the union action settles
only one thing, that there will be no
strike. It does not settle the ques-
tion of further wage reduct'n or of
freight reduction."
Texans Still Out
With the code messages officially
calling off the strike sent out today,
only one echo remained of the rail-
road crisis, which for two weeks
threatened to develop into a general
rail strike. The situation was un-
changed on the Texas lines, where 600
trainmen walked out last Saturday.
No order to call off the strike was
sent these men, W. G. Lee, president
of the trainmen, saying that the
matter "is in the hands of the union
officials down there."
Mr. Lee, however, conferred with
the Labor board today, and it is known
that he is making every effort te
bring a settlement of the strike which
will be satisfactory to the employes
Rail Heads Leave Chicago
The chiefs of the "Big Five" left
for their homes tonight. The Labo
board continued work on its decision
for Wednesday's hearing and proba-
bly will render it tomorrow.
MICHIGAN TEACHERS MAKE'
DEAN WHITNEY PRESIDENT
I - liILi ltIL i
ORGANIZATION WILL CONSIDE
ENDORSEMENT OF SCHOOL
OF EDUCATION

Dean A. S. Whitney, of the School
of Education, was elected president 01
the Michigan State Teachers' associa-
tion yesterday at its convention in
Detroit. The organization will vote
on a resolution today giving the asso-
ciation hearty endorsement to' th
new School of Education at the Uni-
versity:
Other officers elected by the con-
vention for the following year are as
follows: Charlyes S. Poor, superin-
tendent of the Traverse City schools,
first vice-president; Mrs. Bessie
Priddy, of the State Normal at Ypsi-
lanti, second vice-president; C. H
Griffey, superintendent of the public
schools of Adrian, third vice-presi-
dent; Mrs. Dessalee Dudley, of Battle
Creek, secretary and treasurer; and
Charles W. Crandall, superintendent
of the Cadillac schools, and Frani
Ellsworth, of Kalamazoo, new mem-
bers of the executive committee.
The name of L. A. Butler, superin-
tendent of public school work in Ann
Arbor, was brought up in connection
with the elation of a president..
Sister of Social Director Dies
Word has been received here of the
death of Mrs. A. J. Garriott, a sistei
of Miss Grace Greenwood, the social
director at Martha Cook dormitory.
Miss Greenwood left here two weeks
ago to be with her sister whose home

To Urbana Trip
Ends At Jackson
For 16 Students
An exciting railroad ride from here
to Jackson, a warm reception by the
police upon arriving in that city, and
several hours of the night in jail were
the experiences of 16 studetns riding
blind baggage to the Illinois game.
More than 25 students stowed them-
selves away on the 10:40 train out of
Ann Arbor Thursday night. Depot of-
ficials tried to put the culprits off
before the train left Ann Arbor, but
without success. They just sneaked
back on.
On the journey the trainmen still
tried to put them off, using the hose
as means of persuasion. The students
believe that the trainmen thought
they were scabs going to Chicago to
break up the impending railroad
strike.
When the train pulled into Jackson
the blind baggagers were welcomed
by a volley of shots from the police.
A general round-up and many chases
through the streets finally landed 16
of the party in jail. Ann Arbor offi-
cials had telephoned ahead to Jack-
son.
That happened at 1:30 o'clock yes-
terday morning. At 4:30 relief ap-
peared upon the horizon when Frank
Blackman, graduate of tho Law
school, obtained their release.
Most of the students had tunas to
go on with the Journey, but a few of
the unlucky ones were forced to re.
turn to Ann Arbor.
PRESS CLUB HAS
tSTRONG PROGRAM

BURTON ADDRESSES'
STATE TEACHE[RS

ing interfered with. Dr. Burton stat- HALLOWE'EN PARTY FOR
ed that the failure to consider the so- CHILDREN AT HOSPITAL
cial significance of the automobile was
a serious one. Through the efforts of the King's
Must Develop Character Daughters of the Congregational
"Any system of education that fails church the children confined at the
to develop character is doomed to University hospital will be given a

Blames Wave of Moral Laxness
War and Passage of Eighteenth
Amendment

to

"CHARACTER BUILDING HAS
BEEN FORGOTTEN," HE SAYSI
Civilization is confronted by a wave
of moral laxity, which should serious-
ly concern educators, President Mar-
ion L. Burton told 4,700 teachers
Thursday afternoon at the convention'
of the Michigan State Teachers' asso-
ciation held in Detroit,
Defends Young People
There never was greater concern for
private morals than at present, the
teachers were told. The cry against,
"these wild young people" is con-
stantly heard. "The wild young peo-
ple," said the President, "are not so
wild as we think they are, nor are we
so conservative as they think us. The
fine standards of our fathers, which
we accuse the young people of violat-
ing, are not so fine as we think they
are. We have made a mess of
things. Ask yourselves what kind of
a world we are turning over to the
youngsters."
The President went on to say that
in view of the various problems be-
fore us - the war tax, the currency
system of Europe, the possibility of a
railway tie-up, the limitation of arma-
ment conference and the unemploy-
menttsituation, it was not strange
that the coming generation should
think that especially fine results have
not been produced by the standards
of the past years.
Blames War
In some ways, the President stat-
ed, the wave of moral laxness was re-
lated to the war and the passage of
the Eighteenth Amendment. Prohibi-
tion, he said, had brought about a
feeling that personal liberty was be-

failure," he said. "Education must
produce sound character. On this
rests the future of American ideals.",
Dr. Burton asserted that there is some
truth in the statement that private
schools have been better able to getl
at character training. He declared
that public schools have been so con-
cerned with the technique of teaching
that they have forgotten that they are
preparing future citizens.
Freshman Lits Elect Officers Monday
Freshman lit elections will be held
from 9 to 2 o'clock Monday, Oct. 31,
in the main corridor of Universityi
hall. At this time ballots will beJ
cast for the various class officers and
one of the two nominees in each case
will be chosen.

Hallowe'en party Monday afternoon.E
The children's wards at the hospital
will be decorated with Jack o' lanterns
and other Hallowe'en festooning, ac-
cording to Mrs. Arthur Hale, Mrs. A.
R. Crittenden and other ladies in
charge of the work.
1 Hinsdale Reappointed to Trusteeship
Dean W. B. Hinsdale, of the Hom-
oeopathic Medical school, has been
reappointed by Governor Groesbeck
os a member of the board of trustees
of the Michigan State sanatorium, it
was announced today. He will serve
in this capacity for a term of six
years.
Seven Teams in Cross Country Meet
Seven teams have entered in the

Intercollegiate cross country meet
which is being held today at Syra-
cuse prior to the Syracuse-Washing-
ton and Jefferson football game in
that city. The schools entering teams
are Syracuse, Mass. Institute of Tech-
nology, Cornell, Columbia, Colgate,
Dartmouth, and Yale.
Women's Organization to Hear Frost
Robert Frost, poet, will speak at the
first meeting of the American Associa-
tion of University Women at three
o'clock Saturday afternoon in the as-
sembly hall of the Union. The associa-
tion invites all women of the Graduate
school and all others who are eligible
to membership to attend this meeting.
Patronize Daily Advertisers.-Adv.
TAXI! TAXI!
PHONE 2012J
PAUL. ZAHNER, Prop.

d

ti

Just Received---

Bryce's American Commonwealth
Calvin's High School Teaching
Clifford's Further Side of Silence
Dewing's Financial Policy
Payne's History of Journalism
Terman's Test Material
WAH R 'S

11

University
Bookstore

a

STUDENTS SUPPLY STORE
UNDER NEW MANACEMENT

Engineers and Architects Materials.

Stationery

Fountain Pens.

Pennants and Blankets

To Hear Bingay and Schoenfield,
of Detroit News, at Supper
Monday Night

'18,

Laundry Agency

Morse and Gilberts Chocolates

Eversharp Pencils

!

WILL DISCUSS IMPORTANT
NEWSPAPER PROBLEMS OF DAY
M. W. Bingay, managing editor of
the Detroit News, and Alan Schoen-
field, '18, special writer for the same
paper, are to speak at the special meet-
ing of the Students' Press club at 6
o'clock Tuesday night at the Union.
The meeting of the Press club will
oe in the form of a buffet supper,
following which the speakers will dis-
cuss various phases of newspaper
work. The luncheon and speeches are
a part of the program that is being
aranged for students of journalism at
the University and others who are in-
terested in newspaper problems.
Mr. Bingay is well known in news-
paper circles in the country, and has
a wide range of experience in dealing
with the journalists' problems, accord-
ing to those who have arranged the
program for Tuesday evening.
His subject has not been definitely
announced, but it is known that his
talk will cover the newspaper prob-
lem in general, and he will explain
many of the problems of the metro-
politan daily.
Mr. Schoenfield has announced his
subject for the evening as "Inter-
views," and will tell what he can
about the work of meeting men and
obtaining their views for print in the
newspaper columns.
An admission of 75 cents will be
charged for the meeting, in order to
defray the expenses incurred in serv-
ing the buffet luncheon.. Tickets will
be on sale at the Union and at Wahr's
book stores. They also will be on
sale in the corridor of Univer-
sity hall from 1 to 4:30 o'clock Monday
afternoon.
Plans Dralvn For
fredical Society
Formulative plans for an undergrad-
uate Medical society, patterned after
the American Medical association, are
under way among the medical stu-
dents. The movement has met with
the approval of Dean Hugh Cabot. The
society will embrace the entire stu-
dent membership of the Medical
school. Primarily, its object is to en-
courage research work among the stu-
dents. In connection with this idea,
a day will be set aside next spring
when several prominent medical men
will speak and students will present
papers to the society.
An executive board has been chosen
and the following nominations for of-
fice have been made: For president,
J. E. Ludwig, '22M, W. R.Torgerson,
'22M; for vice-president, R. L. Must-
ard, '24M, Ruth Snyder, '24M; for sec-
retary, L. C. Ludlum, '23M, G. F. Keip-
er, '22M; J. W. Nagle, '22M; and for
treasurer, O. H. Gillett, '23M; N. S.
Keeler, '24M, and C. B. Zipf, '24M.

Said a visiting father after taking
dinner at the "Y" Inn with his son:
"Gee Son, I'm glad you are eating at
the 'Y' Inn. Your meals are just like we
have at home.
It's true, too!

1 ._..

Attractive'

CORSAGES Distinctive

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Goodhew Floral Co.

Phone 1321

225 E. Liberty

.1

Gruen Agncgy
- -k I ,_

G
R
U
E
N

W
A
T
C
H
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S

FOOTBALL EXTRA
For the Minnesota Game we will
have a big supply of "football" candy
boxes, large and small sizes. Just the
thing for football favors. Better get
yours now.
BETSY ROSS SHOP
15 NICKELS ARCADE
The Christmas Cards

GoldCase Factory and Service Workshops, Gruen Watchmakers Guild
Time Hill,.Cincinnati. where the jeweler's watchmaker can
obtain standardized duplicate parts promptly.
H ALLER & F ULLER
State St. Jewelers

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A Service

That Saves

Cleaning and pressing at our establishment does
more than improve the appearance of your garment
VSwssiIig
Takes out the grit and sand that wear out the fabric
EnerginI'e
Is free from all mineral oils, nothing remains in the
fabric after going through our process.
SWISSILIZED GARMENTS STAY CLEAN LONGER

and Stationery
are Ready! !

.,
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>s
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Orders for engraved cards are
being received daily. Engrav-
ing and Embossing orders left
with us are executed by the best

engravers

in the country.

The Bomne
PHONE 2508
209 South Fourth Ave.

aC uean%
Comany_

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17 NICKELS ARCADE
OPEN EVENINGS

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