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October 29, 1921 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-10-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE WEATHER
SOMEWHAT COLDER
TODAY

r

Sr i tan

att

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIRE
S ERVICE

VOL. XXXI No. 30. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 29, 1921 PRICE FIVE CENTS

CARRIERS PLAN TO
EIT TE
FORNE1WG CUT
DECLARE STRIKE SETTLEMENT
WILL NOT AFFECT PLAN
ANNOUNCED OCT. 14
600 TEXAS EMPLOYEES
STILL AWAY FROM WORK
Labor Board Expected to Render
IDecision for Wednesday Hearing
Tomorrow
(By Associated Press)
Chicago, Oct. 28. - Railroad heads
tonight declared the nation's carriers
would go right ahead with their
plans to seek new wage cuts through
Railway Labor board hearings. This
will be done despite the announce-
ment of the unions that their action
in calling off the strike, scheduled for
Oct. 30, had been influenced by the
board's announcement that a pay re-
duction petition for any class would
not be considered until working con-
ditions for that class had been set-
tied.
Seek Wage Reduction
"The calling off of the strike will
have no effect on the plans announc-
ed by the scarriers, Oct. 14, to seek
immediate wage reduction so that
rates could be reduced," said Samuel
Felton, president of the Chicago
Great Western and president of the
Association of Western~ Railroad Ex-
ecutives. "I don't know how long it
will take to reach a decision on any
pay cut petition, but these petitions
will be presented in a very , short
time. It will be up to the board then
to decide when action will be taken."
Mr. Felton's statements were echoed
by Samuel Dunn, editor of Railway
Age, who in an address at a luncheon
of the local railroad executives, de-
clared that "the union action settles
only one thing, that there will be no
strike. It does not settle the ques-
tion of further wage reduction or of
freight reduction."
Texans Still Out
With the code messages officially
calling off the strike sent out today,
only one echo remained of the rail-
road crisis, which for two weeks
(Continued on Page Eight)
WOMEN ANNOUNCE PLANS
f OR ]ULDING CAPAIGN
MANY SIGN LIFE MEMBERSHIP
PLEDGES AFTER LEAGUE
MEETING
"We are .going to materialize our
dreams for a women's building," said
Edna Groff, '22, in her introductory
talk at the meeting of the Women's
league yesterday afternoon in Hill
auditorium "Definite plans have been
worked out and will be presented to
you."
Neva Lovewell, '22, chairman of the
campaign tid committee, explained
the program of that committee which
will open a booth in the league room
in University hall to sell sendwiches
and home-made cakes on the campus.
The committee will also sell chrysan-
themums for the Minnesota game and
has planned a Christmas bazaar Dec.

8 and 9.
The basis of life membership in the
Women's league was expliined by Su-
san Fitch, 123. The amendment pro-
viding for the filling of vacancies in
the board of directors of the league
was passed.
Pledges for life membership in the
University of Michigan league were
signed by many University women at
the reception in Barbour gymnasium
which followed the meeting.

WATCH FOR THE PINK
EXTRA
The Daily will put out another
pink extra today giving a play by
play account of the Michigan-
Illinois game. A special wire has
been leased from Urbana to The
Daily so that the extra will be on
the streets almost at the same
time the game ends. Call 960 for
returns during the game; do not
call Daily editorial office. Re-
turns will also be given out at
the Union, Huston Brothers, Ma-
iestic and Arcadetheaters, and
Nickels' Arcade dance hall.
The publication offices will be
closed to all persons during the
game except those who are work-
ing on the editorial and business
staffs of the extra.
Watch for the pink sheet. First
on the streets with complete play
by play reports of the game.
RESENTS ACCEPT AID
F BRAZIL EXPEDITION
WILLIAMSON FINANCES PARTY
WHICH WILL EXPLORE
AMAZON
Regents of the University yesterday
accepted the offer of E. B. William-
son, of Bluffton, Ind., to finance a sci-
entific expedition to the basin of the
Upper Amazon in Brazil. The party,
to be known as the University of
Michigan expedition, has been offered
all possible assistance by the Brazil-
ian government in its work.
Announcement of the personnel of
the party or the date of departure for
South America has not yet been
made. Mr. Williamson, through whose
gift the expedition is made possible,
is honorary curator of odonata in the
University museum.
JUNIOR SOCIETY
JOINS SIGMA XI
Codification of the by-laws and the
incorporation of several new ones was
accomplished at a meeting of Sigma
Xi, national honorary scientific society
held at 5 o'clock yesterday in room
217, Natural Science building.
One of the most important of the
new by-laws provides for the in4r-
poration or affiliation of other scien-
tifie organizations into Sigma Xi. The
first step toward making Sigma Xi a
clearing house for all such societies
was made when affiliation by the Jun-
ior Research club was completed at
this meeting.
'ulletin
(Special to The Daily)
Urbana, Oct. 28.-- The team morale
is excellent. Boys are full of pep and
ready to meet the Illini. Weather
conditions favorable with a brisk
wind blowing. Field is in good shape
and should be fast tomorrow. Kipke
will. not play and Cappon will take
his place at half.
Michigan Lineup
Kirke L. E., Johns, L. T., Dunne, L.
G., Vick C., Wilson R. G., Muirhead R.
T., Goebel R.E., Uteritz Q., Cappon
L. H., Roby F. B., Steketee R. H.
Sister of Social Director Dies
Word has, been received here of the
death of Mrs. A. J. Garriott, a sister
of Miss Grace Greenwood, the social

director at Martha Cook dormitory.
Miss Greenwood left here two weeks
ago to be with her sister whose home
was in Bedford, Ky.
Hoey, '24, Is Recovering
Harry Hoey, '24, who was operated
upon Wednesday morning for appendi-
citis, is doing well, according to a.
hospital report given out yesterday.
WATCH FOR THE PINK EXTRA.

SPECIAL CARRIES
0 0 TO ILLINOIIS
Student Train Composed of Fifteen
Cars Arrives at Urbana This
Morning

FULL QUOTA
SOLD TO

OF GAME SEATS
MICHIGAN ROOTERS

Loaded with enthusiastic students
on their way to the biggest Conference
football struggle of the day-to what
they hoped to be a great comeback
for Michigan, the special train for
Urbana pulled out of the Michigan
Central station at 10 o'clock last night.
A total of 600 students made the trip,
accompanied by the Varsity cheer
leader and the band.
Run 15 Cars
The train run by the Michigan Cen-
tral was a full section, containing 11
Pullmans, three day coaches, and one
club car. The number originally plan-
ned was added to as the students ap-
plying )for accommoations exceedett
the required 300 toward the end of
the week.
That the number of students making
the journey to Urbana on the special
is only a small part of all the Michigan
men and women that will witness the
game is evidenced by the fact that the
full quota of 1000 seats that were
sent up by the Illinois athletic author-
ities were sold out early yesterday,
afternoon. More than 50 students ap-
plied yesterday for tickets after the
supply had been exhausted and deter-
mined to take a chance on getting them
at Urbana at game time today.
Return Tomorrow
A special car was run for the ac-
commodation of University women and
special entertainment will be provid-
ed for them. The train reached Illin-
ois at 7 o'clock this morning and will
remain there till 10 o'clock tonight,
when it will start on the return trip,
arriving in Ann Arbor at 9 o'clock
tomorrow morning.

PRESS ."CLUBHA
STRONG PPGRAM
To Hear Bingay and Schoenfleld, '18,
of Detroit News, at Supper
Monday Night
WILL' DISCUSS IMPORTANT
NEWSPAPER PROBLEMS OF DAY
M. W. Bingay, managing editor of
the Detroit News, and Alan Schoen-
field, '18, special writer for the same
paper, are to speak at the special meet-
ing of the Students' Press club at 6
o'clock Tuesday night at the Union.
The meeting of the Press club will
be in the form of a buffet supper,
following which the speakers will dis-
cuss various phases of newspaper
work. The luncheon and speeches are
a part of the program that is being
aranged for students of journalism at
the University and others who are in-
terested in newspaper problems.
Mr. Bingay is well known in news-
paper circles in the country, and has
a wide range of experience in dealing
with the journalists' problems, accord-
ing to those who have arranged the
program for Tuesday evening.
His subject has not been definitely
announced, but it is known that his
talk will cover the newspaper prob-
lem in general, and he will explain
many of the problems of the metro-
politan daily.
Mr. Schoenfield has announced his
subject for the evening as "Inter-
views," and will tell what he can
about the work of meeting men and
obtaining their views for print in the
newspaper columns.
An admission of 75 cents will be
charged for the meeting, in order to
defray the expenses incurred in serv-
ing the buffet luncheon. Tickets will
be on sale at the Union and at Wahr's
book stores. They also will be on
sale in the corridor of Univer-
sity hall from 1 to 4:30 o'clock Monday
afternoon.

Students Invited
To AlumniSmoker
An opportunity to see the Michigan-
Illinois game, play by play, on a min-
iature gridiron is offered to all stu-
dents by the Detroit alumni who have
planned a big smoker for this after-
noon at which there will be cheers.
detailed reports of the game and en-
tertainment. All who cannot get to
Urbana are invited by the alumni to1
come into Detroit and attend the smok-
er, at the corner of Lafayette and First]
streets. The program will begin at
2 o'clock.
The program arranged for the aft-
ernoon is in charge of J. M. O'Dea,
'09, and will consist of several vaude-
ville skits, songs , cheers led by Var-
sity cheer leaders, and all the features
of a pep meeting. Cider, smokes and
doughnuts will be provided in addi!
tion. The admission charge is $1.
MIHIGN]TEACHERS MAKE
DEAN WHITNEY PRESIDENT
ORGANIZATION WILL CONSIDER
ENDORSEMENT OF SCHOOL
OF EDUCATIONf
Dean A. S. Whitney,. of the Schoolf
of Education, was elected president of
the Michigan State Teachers' associa-
tion yesterday at its convention in
Detroit. The organization will vote
on a resolution today giving the asso-
ciation hearty endorsement to the
new School of Education at the Uni-
versity.
Other officers elected by the con-
vention for the following year are as
follows: Charlyes S. Poor, superin-
tendent of the Traverse City schools,
first vice-president; Mrs. Bessie'
Priddy, of the State Normal at Ypsi-
lanti, second vice-president; C. H.
Griffey, superintendent of the public
schools of Adrian, third vice-presi-
dent; Mrs. Dessalee Dudley, of Battle
Creek, secretary and treasurer; and
Charles W. Crandall, superintendent
of the Cadillac schools, and Frank
Ellsworth, of Kalamazoo, new mem-
bers of the executive committee.
The name of L. A.Butler, superin-
tendent of public school work in Ann'
Arbor, was brought up in connection
with the eltion of a president.
Trip To Urbana
Ends At Jackson'
For i6 Students
An exciting railroad ride from herea
to Jackson, a warm reception by the
police upon arriving in that city, andI
several hours of the night in jail were
the experiences of 16 studetns riding
blind baggage to the Illinois game.1
More than 25 students stowed them-,
selves away on the 10:40 train out of
Ann Arbor Thursday night. Depot of-
ficials tried to put the culprits off
before -the train left Ann Arbor, but
without success.', They just sneaked
back on.
On the journey the trainmen still
tried to put them off, using the hose
as means of persuasion. The students
believe that the trainmen thought
they were scabs going to Chicago to
break up the impending railroad
strike.
When the train pulled into Jackson
the blind baggagers were welcomed
by a volley of shots from the police.
A general round-up and many chases
through the streets finally landed 16

of the party in jail. Ann Arbor offi-
cials had telephoned ahead to Jack-
son.
That happened at 1:30 o'clock yes-
terday morning. At 4:30 relief ap-
peared upon the horizon when Frank
Blackman, graduate of tha Law
school, obtained their release.
Most of the students had funas to
go on with the journey, but a few of
the unlucky ones were forced to re-
turn to Ann Arbor.

TRAMPLED ILLINI'
MEET WOLVEINES
AT URBANATODAY
AFTER TWO REVERSES ZUPPKE
DECLARES HE WILL WIN
REMAIANG GAMES
BOTH TEAMS RECOVER
FROM RECENT INJURIES
Johns, Swan, and Nesech Prepared to
Reinforce Varsity Forward'
Wall
Michigan and Illinois clash on the
gridiron for the eighth time this after-
noon at Urbana. Their meeting will
mark the third annual fray between
a Yost machine and an eleven drilled
by Zuppke.
Both elevens have met with re-
verses, largely due to injuries which
have kept their star players on the
sidelines. This afternoon Zuppke and
Yost will each send an eleven on the
field determined to make amend for
early season disasters. Zuppke has
said that with Crangle back in the
lineup and in condition he expects to
capture the remaining games on the
Indian schedule, while Coach Yost ex-
pects to pit an eleven against the In-
dians which is wiser and more pow-
Buckeyes last Saturday.
Cappon to Backfileldi
Illinois will be strengthened by the
addition of Don Peden, star halfback
from last year's squad who watched
the Wisconsin contest from the side-
lines. Crangle also will be in better
condition than at any time this sea-
son. It has been rumored that Cap-
pon is to be shifted to the backfield
for the game today but nothing defi-
found necessary. As far as is defi-
nitely known the Wolverines will use
practically the same lineup that op-
posed O. S. U., it will be a different
Michigan that meets Illinois. Greater
in reserve strength and trained to
combat the Waquist to Carney pass-
es, Michigan will be a stronger eleven
all around than it was a week ago.
Against Ohio State, Swan was the only
line substitute in condition. Today
Wilson, for three years a veteran on
the line, will again take his place on
the forward wall, while Johns, Swan
and Neisch are in top condition to
hold down any line position.
Teams About Equal
Lined up man for man and compar-
ed individually there is little to choose
between the two elevens. Michigan
appears to be stronger on the left
half of its forward wall, while the
'Wolverine right side is about equal
to the Illinois left.-
Kirk on the left flank opposes Wil-
ison, or Sabo, Cappon meets Drayer at
tackle, and Captain Dunne will play
opposite Anderson at guard. Vick
faces Vogel, Wilson is pitted against
Mohr, Muirhead, at right tackle, plays
against Olander, while Goebel and
Carney battle for honors on end.
Michigan's backfield will be com-
posed of Uteritz, Roby, Steketee and
Kipke. Zuppke is expected to start
Captain Walquist at quarter, Peden at
right half, Sternaman, Durant or Ta-
ber at left halfback, and Crangle at
fullback.
Five veterans on each eleven play-
ed in the game on Ferry field last, fall.
Mohr, Olander, Carney, Walquist, and
Crangle were all factors in Zuppke's
E attack, while Cappon, Captain Dunne,
Vick, Wilson, and Goebel played in
the memorable 7-6 struggle for the

Maize and Blue. Steketee was on the
sidelines during the greater portion
of the game and due to an injury was
unable to carry the ball after his en-
trance into the fray during the final
quarter.
'Kirk at end has had more experi-
ence than Wilson, the opposing Indian
flank man. Wilson is playing his(initial
season for Zuppke and like the Indian
tip men is tall and rangy. Cappon
(Continued on Page Four)

After Dance Dinners Rob Catalpa Of
Allurement 1'orGrads AtHomecomink

(By Leo J. Hershdorfer)
Great old world, this. Michigan's
going to beat the Urbanities today, the
railroad strike has been called off,
Christmas vacation is only a couple of
months off. Everybody's happy 'round
the old town. Great feeling, too, this
permanent joy. Trouble is, though, it's
only local.
Last Saturday was Homecoming day.
All the old boys were in town. Shook
hands, saw the game with Ohio State,
shook heads. Old Man Gloom came in
on a special flyer that day. Made his
way down to the places where the
grads were staying, whispered in their
ears, and then beat it again.
That was some whisper. Just be-
ginning to hear it around the campus
now. Seems as if he told 'em more
news about Joe Parker's. Revelations
were a great shock to the boys. Girls,
women students, are now drinkin' high
and dry down at the old rendezvous.-
High schooners of water, leave dry
taste in mouth. Grads went down to
old tap room, looked over place, saw
old initials carved on table tops, and,
put bands of mourning 'round them.
Don't blame them.
That Gloom kid sure had some volt-
age. Sent out plenty of shocks. Slips
old boys another one. Tells them the
bar is to be taken out. Copious tears
flow from '80 eights and . naughty
naughts. This is last straw for home-
comers. Makes them want to resort
to desperate means. Strange formulae
they used, too.
That's not the half of it, either. Old
dining room down at Joe's being en-
larged. Want to make more room for
dinner parties and after dance affairs.
No stag parties, mostly couples.
Big Boy Joe's in town now, hitting
on all six. Got good news, too. Says
that Joe's table tops, with initials

and football scores of all years from
'95 to '17, are to be sold. Many out-
siders want to eget hold of 'em. Of-
fer big money, too, Joe says no. Wants
them to stay in town, prefering Union
tap room. Good chance for some of
the old boys to step in and parley with
Joe. Save themselves further Jupe
Pluvian outbursts, if they do. Besides,
if they go down to the taproom, "Men
Only" admittance signs will still hold
good.
WHEELER APPEARS
IN TOMORROW'S
FACULTY CONCERT
William Wheeler, head of the voice
department of the School of Music,
and Mrs. George B. Rhead of the piano
department will give the second con-
cert in the faculty series at 4:15
o'clock tomorrow in Hill auditorium.
Mrs. Rhead has chosen two inter-
esting groups, while Mr. Wheeler will
sing selections representing composi-
tions from several French writers and
five songs by Greig.
X. M. JOHNSON, '23E,
SERIOUSLY INJURED
Veal M. Johnson,'23E, of High-
land Park, is in a serious con-
dition at an Ypsilanti hospital as
the result of having been struck
by a Ford truck while walking in
the country near Ypsilanti with
his roommate last night. He
suffered a broken leg and In.
juries about the skull. He was
still unconscious at a late hour
last night.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

POPULAR PRICES
FIVE BIG CONCERTS
$2.00 - $3.00 - $4.00
$5.00

OSSIP# GABRILOWITSCH and the
DETROIT SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
WILL GIVE FIVE BIG POPULAR ORCHESTRA-ARTIST CONCERTS IN HILL AUDITORIUM:
(1) Nov. 8-ESTELLE LIEBLING, Soprano; (2) Dec.- 12-RAOUL VIDAS, Violin; (3) Jan. 23-
OSSIP GABRILOWITSCH, Pianist; (4) Feb. 20 - HANS KINDLER, 'Cello; (5) March 27-
BENDETSON NETZORG, Pianist.

TICKETS ON SALE
-AT THE -
UNIVERSITY SCHOOL
OF MUSIC

Nooo~woow4pw4A

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