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October 25, 1921 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-10-25

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THE WEATHER
CLOUDY AND WARMER
TODAY

Y.l e

i an

ju ttl

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIRE
SERVICE

VOL. XXXII. No. 26 ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN. TUESDAY, OCTOBER 25, 1921 PRICE FIVE CENTS

i

BURTON SPEAKS ON
SELFRESPECT AT
SUNDAY SERVIGES
FIRST SUNDAY SERVICE OF YEAR
ATTRACTS BIG
CROWD
VARSITY GLEE CLUB
SINGS TWO NUMBERS
Speaker Calls Integrity, Mastery, Ac-
tion, Sense of Right, Essential
to Useful Life
"Self Respect" was the subject of
President Marion L. Burton at the
University service Sunday night in
Hill auditorium. He drove home very
forcibly the essentials of this virtue.
Self respect was not big-headedness
nor an aristocratic notion, he said,
but was a "consciousness of the re-
sponsibilities of your community and
of yourself."
Of the four requirements of self re-
spect outlined by President Burton,
integrity came first. "Integrity is that
which enables a man to look the
the world straight in the eye and com-
mand the respect of the world," he
said. "He must get into the habit of
speaking the truth at all times under
all circumstances. America has been
guilty of the vice of superficiality.
Multitudes of men have not been do-
ing an honest day's work. If you lead-
ers of the future are to lay the foun-
dations which will make us all respon-
sible for the generations just ahead,
we must have self respect, which re-
quires integrity in work, in speech and
in actual character."
"Master Your Work"
The second requirement is a sense
of mastery, the feeling in a man
he has the power to master some-
thing. Evil of every type exists to be
conquered and a man is a man and
a woman is a woman just so far as he
or she can walk up to these things
and master them. We should master
whatever our work may be, rather
than have that work master us, and
by this means keep our integrity and
be conscious of our dignity and re-
serve power for coming inevitable
crises.
"You must actively oppose the
things of which you disapprove," said
President Burton in summarizing the
third requirement of self respect.
",The man of self respect in a democ-
racy is the man who sees to it that
the things which he does not approve
are opposed. Every citizen must be
responsible for the problems of the
community of which he is a citizen.
"Respect Yourself"
"Fourth, any mani who is to respect
himself must have a sense of being
right with his universe." This was
considered by President Burton to be
perhaps the most important of the re-
quirements of self respect. It is the
trait upon which a man builds all his
other life. A man who believes he
is right with his God, with his con-1
science, with his community, with his
world, that man may respect him-
self.
"Finally," said President Burton,
'come the results of self respect. The
person who respects himself gets
certa n results which cannot be ob-
tain in any other way, for he sees
his full powers and is at liberty to
do his work. Justso far as you are
the man you ought to be, you will

have power in your community and in
your world."
Tells of S. C. A. Work

STUDIES ADD MANY
YEARS TO HISTORY
--PROF. LANGDON
"More than 3,000 years have been
added to antiquity from 1898 to tue
present day, and it is now posible to
trace the histories of kings and dy-
nasties as far back as 5000 B. C.," said
Prof. Stephen E. Langdon, '98, profes-
sor of assyriaology at Oxford, in his
lecture delivered before an interested
audience in the Natural Science audi-
torium Monday afternoon at 4:15.
. Professor Langdon accompanied his
lecture with lantern slides showing
different phases of the religious life
of the Sumaric peoples as well as re-
plicas of liturgies and ' folk-songs,
aMong which the title "Love is Blind"
appeared especially modern. Similari-
ties which have come down through
the Babylonian conceptions and prov-
inces into our Christian religion were
also emphasized and, further, "legends
of antiquity (5000 B. C.)) have been
passed on into the Hebrew, and still1
persist today".
OPERA SCENERY PLANSI
COMPLETED BY BRUMEL
ACTUAL CONSTRUCTION STARTS
AT UNION WORKSHOP NEXT 7
WEEK
Designs for the scenery of the1
Union opera, "Make It For Two", are
now being worked on by Carl Bro-
mel, the Detroit artist who has plan-.
ned the opera scenery for several
years, and actual construction will be
started within a week. Several new
ideas were outlined by Bromel to the
directors of the 1921 opera during his
visit in Ann Arbor last week, when he
received a synopsis of the plot and
sketched the probable layout of the
various scenes.
The set of the first act, the music
room of the Houghton's family home
on Long Island, will be elaborately
done. The second act will be futuris-
tic in style, a type of decoration at
which Bromel is said to be particular-
ly skilled. He is planning on using
for this act a new shade of red that
was just introduced on the New York
stage six months ago. He is now
sketching his plans for the whole per-
formance at his workshop in Detroit
and will be in Ann Arbor in a few
days to supervise the carpentry work.
Bromel has a considerable reputa-
tion throughout the West as a scenic
artist, having been employed by
Zekfeld Follies during their last run
in Detroit to retouch the scenery be-
ing used on their western tour.
News of the Day
IN BRIEF
' 1

91IL BOARD SEES A
"GREAT HOPE" OF g
AVERTING STRIKEo
BROTHERHOOD CHIEFS SAY DATE e
CANNOT BE POST-H
PONED w
R
COLISEUM PICKED FOR s
HEARINGS WEDNESDAYM
g
ignalmen's Union of 15,000 Votes Not
to Authorize Walkout at t
Present g
g
t
(By Associated Press)
Chicago, Oct. 24. - An announce-
nent which is expected to have ant
mportant bearing on reaching an ar-
>itrary decision concerning the threat-
fled strike of railway workers was
iven out here tonight when the rail
road labor board declared that there
s "great hope" that the strike can be
ettled and that a probable tie-up of
he nation's industries will thus be'
prevented.
Word was also received by the I-
or board from the chiefs of the "Big P
pour" brotherhoods, reiterating the &
warning that the strike could not be i
postponed, although it may be set- d
led.
r
The Coliseum, the scene of manyr
nationalpoliticalconventions, wasq
tnally chosen by the boards a the i
place where strike hearings will be t
eld, with an attendance of 1,800 rail
and union chiefs, beginning Wednes-v
day, Oct. 26. Together with an invi-
tation to the public to be present ato
he hearings, it was also made imper- i
ative that every one of the 1,800 exec- e
utives must attend every session. b
Officials of the signalmen's union,'
representing 15,000 rail employes,
voted not' to permit authorization of
walkouts at present, thus narrowing
down the number of prospective strik-
ers to 475,000 trainmen, conductors,i
engineers, firemen, switchmen and i
telegraph operators.-
SENIOR ENGINEERS HEAR
FORMERFACULTY MANn
CLASS FAVORS STUDENT CHEER-s
ING SECTION AT ILLINOIS t
GAMEt
Gardner S. Williams, '89E, formert
professor of engineering and now an
Ann Arbor consulting engineer, ad-
dressed the October senior engineers'
assembly upon power developments ine
nonnection with the St. Lawrence deep
waterway yesterday morning in the
engineering assembly room.6
- Class business transacted by thet
assembly included the passage of a
esolution favoring astrictly student
cheering section for the Illinois game,
students to be segregated from alum-
ni and visitors for the purpose of pro-
curing better organized cheering.
A. 0. Cuthbert was elected class ath-
letic manager. .
G. W. McCordic, class president, an-t
nounced the appointment of the fol-
[oiwng committees: Social - R. S.d
Kersey, chairman; E. S. Bradley, S.a
Peterson, A. D. Stauffer, C. M. Vogt.1
Finance-C. M. Kreuger, chairman;

M. A. Goetz, the president, vice-presi-
dent and treasurer. Auditing-W. E.
Bandemer, chairman, and E. B. Tuck-
er. Publicity-Norman Clements. M..
N. Boonstra, R. Lambrecht. Advisory--
All class officers and the chairmen of
the social, finance, and auditing com-
mittees.
ALPHA EPSILON MU GIVES
ENTERTAINMENT FOR BAND
Alpha Epsilon Mu, honorary musi-
cal fraternity, -gave a joint smoker for
the University and 0. S. U. bands in
the Union after the game last Satur-
day.
The purpose of the smoker was to
develop a co-operative spirit between
the two bands. Directors from both
bands gave brief talks. This is the
second of these get-together smokers

ADVISERS TO MEET
AT UNION TONIGHT
Upperelass advisors with names be-
inning with the letters A to F, inclu-
ive, will participate in a joint meet-
yg with their freshmen at 7:30
'clock tomorrow night in the assem-
ly hall of the Michigan Union.
Several speakers have been procur-
ed for the occasion. Prof. W. R.
lumphreys of the English department
will represent the faculty. Walter
lea, '22, will talk on "Sports", Emer-
ion Swart, '22E, will speak of the
dichigan Union, and Byron Field,
rad., will deal with the various pub-
ications.
All delay will be avoided, so that
hose having work to do may have a
ood part of the evening to attend
o it.
'S"FOR MINNESOTA AME
SMALL PROPORTION REQUEST
SEATS IN CHEERING
SECTION
Seats in the cheering section at the
big football games are entirely un-
popular, judging from the applications
'or Minnesota tickets, which are arriv-
ng in the Athletic association offic
laily. Out of some 200 orders, taken at
andom from the files, only about one-
quarter of the students desired to sit
n the cheering section and respond
o the yells.
The admitted poor cheering at the
ecent Ohio State game caused the res-
olution passed by the senior engineer
n their assembly yesterday, to the
effect that a genuine cheering section
be created. To this end it was pro.
posed to completely segregate the
students and the alumni, placing their
n diffeernt ends of the stands.
This resolution will be presented to
the Student council, which at present
is trying to determine a means of al-
oting the tickets so that more student
will sit together and aid in the yells
Action will be taken Wednesday night
when the council meets.
The few ticket orders examined yes-
terday at the athletic office, showe'
that seats in the cheering section were
not favorable to the majority of the
students. Out of 64 applications from
seniors, but four desired seats in the
section, Juniors were a bit more prone
to yell, 38 out of 139 wishing to sit in
that part, and the freshmen were split
half and half in their choice betweer
the section and other parts of the field
A good many of those wishing to sit
in other parts of the stands were men
attending the game alone or with oth
er students.
SAYS "SO TO ILLINOIS"
WRITER PLEADS FOR SUPPORT
OF STUDENTS FOR TEAM WHEN
IT GOES TO URBANA
Editor Michigan Daily:
Men and women of Michigan, our
football team has just suffered its
third successive defeat from Ohio
State. This message is not to con-
done or bereave the fact. We lost to
a team that outplayed us. The task
before us is to win our remaining
games.

SURPRISE PEP MEETING BRINGS OUT
THOUSANDS; BAND TRIP' TO ILLINOIS
ASSURED BY 8302.178 CONTRIBUTED

. I

LET'S GO MICHIGAN!I
No special train can be run for
the Illinois game unless at least
one hundredamore tickets are
secured by students. The round
trip fare will be $12.14.
Five hundred tickets are still
available for some of the choic-
est seats in the Illinois stands,
for Saturday's game. Five hun-
dred have been sold to date.
Buy that ticket at the Union
today, not tomorrow or the next
day! Don't be a piker! No
team can win unless it is sup.
ported!l
LET'S GO MICHIGAN!

TOTAL RAISED IS ,NOW NEARLY
$1,000, STATES BUSINESS
MANAGER
"FORGET DEFEAT BY
O.S,U.", SAY SPEAKERS
"Shorty" Longman,'05, Goetz,-Wieman.
Banks, Hillery and Usher Speak;
Cuthbert Leads Yells

1
'tt
I

LIFE MEMBERSHIP
DRIVE OPENS NOV.9

Maynard A. Newton, '22, Heads
mittee Which Conducts
Canvass
CAPTAINS FOR CAMPAIGN

Com-

PICKED;

PLANS COMPLETEI

Committee appointments are being
rapidly completed for a membershipt
campaign through which every Mich-
igan man, faculty member and alum-t
nus in the city will be given an op-1
portunity to become a life member of1
the Michigan Union. The campaignt
will open on Nov. 8 and continue untilt
the night of Nov. 10.I
The jersonnel of the committee un-
der the general chairmanship of May-
nard A. Newton, '22, is as follows:
Assistant general chairman, Frank Mc-
Pike, '23, and Lawrence D'Ooge, '24;
team captains, Frederick Weyand, '23E,I
George F. Perrin, '23, Wallace F. El-
liott, '22, Henry H. Hubbard, '24E.
Maurice M. Moule, '23, Ross Riford, '23,
George W. Fiske, Jr., '23E, Fred E. Gil-
ner, '24, Ralph L. Hagamier, '23, Lyle
S. Hubbard, '23, George E. Sloan, '24L.
Walter K. Sherer, '24, Robert W. Pres-
ton, '24E, Edward C. Stark, '24, C. Ar-
thur Campbell, '24E, Kenneth Hoag,
'24, William C. Valentine, '23, and al-
umni team captain, Harry A. S. Clark,
'23.
The faculty campaign will be in
.harge of Seth R. Bidwell, '24L, and
the "flying squadron," a body which
Droved its value in the campaign last
vear, will be headed by Joseph W.
Crabbe, '23E. Last year this division
of the committee brought in 132 signa-
tures for life memberships after the
members of the committee proper had
°nterviewed the men and failed to sign
'hem up. Each team captain will se-
lect the members of his own team and
plan the territory which they will be
expected to canvass.
S.A.L. Has Best
Decorated House
Sigma Alpha Epsilon won the cup
which was offered as a prize for the

"Go to Illinois, send the band there,
and forget the Ohio State game," was
the keynote of the pep meeting held
last night at Hill auditorium. The
meeting, called for the purpose ef get-
ting enough students to sign up for
the special train that will carry the
Michigan rooters to -Urbana, was at
tended by more than 3,000 students and
from the first resounding cheers to the
last word it was the finest Michigan
pep meeting so far this year.
That the band will go to Illinois was
definitely determined by the collection
which was taken up at the close of
the meeting. Men with pails collecting
at the exits, added $302.78 to the sum
which has already been secured for
the purpose of sending the band into
the Indians' territory. The total now
is approximately $1,000, which accord-
ing to Seth R. Bidwell, manager, is
practically enough to defray the ex-
penses which will be incurred.
Band Parades
With but a few hours advance notice,
the Varsity band met at the Union at
7:45 o'clock and marched about the
town, students rapidly filing in behind.
At 8:30 o'clock the doors of the audi-
torium were thrown open and the
crowd entered. The band loaded on
trucks and continued to advertise the
meeting.
Angus G. Goetz, '22M, last year's
Varsity captain and president of the
Student council at present, presided
at the meeting and introduced the
various speakers. He brought out the
fact, in'a preliminary talk, that it is
up to the students to support theteam
now as it never did before.
Wieman Speaks
"Tad" Wieman, last year's tackle and
now assistant coach, declared that we
are at a testing place. "Either Mich-
igan spirit is to be characterized by
red-blooded he-men or by critics and
quitters," he stated. "It is time to put
0. S. U. behind and begin looking to
Illinois."
"Ted" Banks, Varsity quarterback
who was unableto play last Saturday
because of injuries, further brought
out the advantages of looking toward
the future, anddeclared that the root-
ors should turn their eyes to Illinois
Hillery Says Forget Defeat
Vernon F. Hillery, '23, business man-
ager of The Daily and Junior lit coun-
cIlman, declared that we have now no
reason for being disheartened. He
pointed out that Michigan had been
considered one of the possible con-
tenders for the Big Ten championship
that other schools had been watching
the Maize and Blue, and that a de-
feat in our first game with six men out
was nothing to point to a disastrous
year.
"Shorty" Longman, '05, former Var-
city halfback, spoke and brought out
the point that the yell master can't put
pep into the crowd, that it's within the
rooters themselves. He urged the root-
ers to show this pep by going to
Illinois and going strong.
Usher Praises Band
"Eddie" Usher, disabled halfback
characterized the thrill of the Mich-
igan band on a foreign field as a feel-
ing which could not be equalled and
urged that the band be given the Illin-
ois trip.
"Al" Cuthbert, Varsity yellmaster,
led the cheering, and a number of as-
sistants aided in the work.

Walter B. Rea, '22, presiding offi-
cer, opened the service by introducing
James G. Frey, '22, who told of the
Student Christian - association dele-
gates' experiences at the Eastern Re-
ligious conference held last summer
at Silver bay.
The Varsity Glee club furnished the
musical number on the program. Se-
lections chosen were "Laudes Atque
Carmina" and "Morning Song", both
by Dr. A. A. Stanley. The club had
sung only after two rehearsals and
the work done shows 'bright prospects
for the coming season. The hymn
singing was led by George Oscar
Bowen and Earl V. Moore played an
organ prelude and postlude. Scrip-
ture reading and prayers Were by
Rev. Charles T. Webb of St. Andrew's

Washington, Oct. 24.-Regulationr
covering the use of beer and wine forc
medical purposes will be issued im-s
mediately by the treasury, Secretaryn
Mellon announced today.
The regulation, Mr. Mellon said,
permits the manufacture and pre-I
scription of beer and wine for the
ick.
Phoenix, Ariz., Oct. 24.-An indict-T
ment against Ralph Harry Cameron,=
United' States senator from Arizona,I
was returned by the Federal Grand
jury at the last term of the Unitedd
States district court here, accordingF
to a brief entry made in the minuteE
book of the court today. The indict-T
ment was on a charge of perjury.
Aboard Steamship Kashimia, Maru,t
Oct. 24. - The basis of Japan's pro-
gram at the Washington conference on1
the limitation of armaments and far
eastern questions will be a desire to
maintain a defensive navy large
enough to cope with any naval force,
that any other nation would be capa-
ble of sending into the Far East, ac-!
cording to information given today.,
London, Oct. 24.-It is reported that
former Emperor Charles has been
captured by the national army, says
a Reuter dispatch from Budapest. Em-
peror Charles had been making a des-
perate effort to regain his throne and
had for the past two days been backed

here to back their team - a team
which only two weeks before had lost
to a minor efven. Saturday our men
fought this team to the very lest whis-
tle. Don't forget that! Whatever
faults there might have been Michi-
gan, with her injured men, lost fight-
ing like a lioness.
Ohio brought her rooters here.
What Is Michigan going to do about
supporting her team at Urbana? Re-
member, Michigan never dies.
SENIOR.
.- -
Aeronauts to Hear Pawlowski
Prof. Feliw W. Pawlowski of the
aeronautical engineering department
will address the Aeronautical society
at 7:30 o'clock tonight in room 203,
Union, it was announced yesterday by

the prize-winning decoration was a
miniature Ferry field laid out in the
side yard, near which was a stake to
which was tied a real, for-sure goat
festively decorated with the 0. S. U.
colors.
The cup was the result of joint
contributions by the Blu-Maize Blos-
som shop, Arcade Jewelry company,
Busy Bee restaurant, Calkins-Fletcher
Drug company, Quarry Drug com-
pany, and Wagner and company. The
awarding of the prize was supervised
by the Student council and the Home-
coming day committee.
Faculty Wives to Plan Organization
The wives of deans, administrative
officers, and heads of departments are
asked to meet with Mrs. M. L. Burton

Ohio sent six thousand rooters up I best decorated house. The feature ofI

11
n

BOTANISTS WILL HEAR BOOK
REVIEWS BY PROF. POLLOCK
There will be a meeting of the Bo-
tanical Journal club tonight at 8
o'clock in room 173 Natural Science
building. Prof. James B. Pollock, of
the Botany department, will review

that Alpha Epsilon Mu has given for officers of the society.
the bands of opposing teams, as a
similar smoker was held after the M. WIN FROM ILLIN(

promptly at 3 o'clock on Wednesdhy' three books.
afternoon at 815 South University
avenue, to discuss the advisability of WIN FROM ILLINOIS:
.,"a ;Y-n. 'oilf- 'Wman , nn,, HTV A 41SPF!1 AT. TC

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