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October 23, 1921 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-10-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

S COUNTRY RUNNERS

All That fichigan Football Team Is
Or Hopes To 7Be It Owes To Coaches

U'

MICHIGAN. IN OPERING MEET

ith Lower Score Wins in Hill
Dale Race By Close Count
of 8 to 82
S CROSSES TAPE AHEAD
CHUTE AND WHITTEMORE
e defeated Coach Farrell's men
nnual dual cross country run
ty morning by a 23: to 32 score.
the Purdue ace, was the first
cross the tape, closely follow-
iute of Michigan. Furnas cov-
course in the splendid time of
tes and 38 seconds, with Chute
seconds behind. These two
a neck and neck over the first
les of the course, but near the
e, the Purdue star. drew away
L Wolverine runner and was
eaded.
emore of Michigan, was third
)dman. of Purdue, was fourth.
r men came in in the following
Magruder; Captain Harrison,
Purdue, Bowen, Marston, Stan-
urcell, Tammy. of Michigan,
of Purdue, and ,. Earhart of
Ui.
Purdue Pleased
O'Connor, of the Boilermak-
well pleased with the showing
eam and expects that his men
Lke other Conference runners
beat them for the Big Ten title.
ting coach was also impressed
o splendid treatment he and
t received while here.
a, the winner of the race, isa
of no moan ability as he has
many firsts in the Conference
.ountry and track meets, be-
ing a member of the Olympic
contests in Italy, France, and
uropean countries. The only
hat bothered the Purdue men
great number of hills encoun-
ver the course. They have
ed to stepping over level.
s and the hills slowed them up
at.
Freshmen Hold Trial
y night the freshmen. had ae-
rial run which was far more
ng than the one held the pro-
eek. About 25 yearling were
the trip and good time was
r the three mile course. Isbell,
pped first in the former trial re-
his feat again Friday, although
closely followed by Rienke.
nen to finish under the first.
e: Zinn, Aunztuz, McFarland,'
dding. Although the yearling-
wing more interest in the dist-
ent than before there is still
om for good runners.
Point, Ever Sharp and Auto
encils in silver and gold. Hal-
cller, State St. Jewelers.-Adv.

All that the Michigan football team
,is or ever hopes to be, it owes to its
coaches.
Too often, many times too often, the
success of a football team is directly
attributed to the stellar performance
of certain members on it and the
coaches, the men who literally mother
the team through its earlier stages
of development, the men who are out
on the field day in and day out lend-
ing their advice to those who are
most in need of It, thehmen who work
6ut the plays to be used in battle,
the men who direct the execution of
these very plays from the sidelines
unobserved by the cheering throng§,
members of the board of strategy, as
it were, are ungratefully overlooked
in the great and intense excitement of
victory.

here to assume the role of Varsity
baseball coach. Coach Fisher has
"Beak" Weston as his aide in teach-
ing the reserves the game of foot-
ball as it should be played. "Beak"
played in the backfield of the '17 and
'19 teams, where he made up for his
slightness of stature by his plucky
fighting.
Coaches Mather and Karpus lead
the All-Fresh team through its prac-
tices. Coach Mather, another all-[
around athleteain his college days,
came to Michigan as Varsity basket-
ball coach after having held like po-
sitions at Lake Forest and Kalamazoo
Normal. Helping him with the year-
ling "pig-skin" chasers is "Joe" Kar-
pus who but last June graduated from
active participation in Michigan ath-
letics. These two yearling coaches
complete the list of regular football
coaches.

Maddock and Cole Help
However, this list of coaches was
supplemented for the Ohio State
game. "Joe" Maddock and "King"
Cole, two star tackles from the 1902
and 1903 teams, sacrificed all of
their personal business affairs to aid
Coach Yost in creating a forwardl
wall that coped successfully with the
line of the Buckeyes. No matter what.
the outcome of the game yesterday
afternoon may be, this coaching staff
is deserving of a great deal of credit.

Prof. Mittenthal from Detroit, the
most up-to-date dancing instructor-
will teach you the Terrace Fox Trot,
Culture Walk, and the University
Waltz. Class 7 to 8:30. Can be paid
in two payments. Ladies $5.00, Gen-
tlemen $8.00, for eight lessons.-Adv.
Special three piece orchestra every
evening from 6 to 7:30 P. M. at Chi-
nese Gardens.-Adv.
Special three piece orchestra every
evening from 6 to 7:30 P. M. at Chi-
nese Gardens.-Adv.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
SUNDAY, 10:30 A. M.
DR. ALLYN K. FOSTER
OF NEw YORK

You are invited

KIPHE
Whose. removal was a big factor in
SMichigans defeat.
ILLINOIS PUSHES
STADIUM CAMPAIGN
'Champaign, Ill., Oct. 22. - Stu-
dents and alumni of the University of
Illinois are raising $2,500,000 to build
a memorial stadium at Champaignn.
It will be dedicated to the Illinois
men who fought in the war. A field
of 100 acres near the campus has been
purchased and construction will be
started early next year.
In the original student drive last
spring $700,000 was subscribed and
this week the freshman class added
$300,000, making the total an even
million. The remainder is to be rais-
ed by the alumni, of which there are
about 42,000 with 740 in the state of
Michigan.
Pep meetings. will be held Oct. 29
In every city in the United States in
which there are alumni associations,
preceding the subscription drive
which will be prosecuted Nov. 1 to 5.
The Northern State Normal College
Alumni Banquet for the Michigan State
Teachers' Association will be held at
the Addison Hotel, Detroit, at 6:30 P.
M., Thursday, October 27th. Re-
servations may be made with Vero H.
June, 247 E. Warren Ave., Detroit,
or with Roy'I. Brown, care Cass Tech-
nical High School. Dinner will be $2.00
per plate. Pres. Kaye and Prof. Lewis
will be present.-Adv.

Not Merely Individuals
Every player on Michigan's football
team most certainly appreciates pre-
cisely what his coaches mean to the
team, how indispensable they really
are. The success of a football team
does not necessarily depend upon the'
performance of any individual mem-
ber thereon; but it does largely de-
pend upon the work of its coaches.
Michigan men and women have al-
ways realized this fact and have giv-
en just credit to the coaches.
Fielding H. Yost, one of the "grand
old men" of football, heads the Mich-
igan football coaching staff. In his
college days "Hurry-Up" gained an
enviable reputation by his stellar per-
formances inthe backfields of a West
Virginia football representation and
ever since that time has lieen actve-
ly connected with the game s a
coach. Before coming here in 1901,
exactly 20 years ago, "the old man"
parcelled out his football knowledge
and skill to gridders at Ohio Wes-
leyan, Nebraska, and Leland-Stan-

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Heaters EVEREADY Flashlights
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Electric Study Lamps and Silk cover
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Tills TAFIs
LOSES CLOSES"
P.M. ADVERTISING AT a P.M.

HEAD COACH YOST
ford with varied success. What he
has done for Michigan in the foot-
ball world during his 20 years as
coach here does not have to be men-
tioned; most everyone is familiar
with his attainments. Fielding H. Yost
is the "old man" who put Michigan
on the football horizon.
Yost Assistants
Assisting Yost with the Varsity are
Coaches Sturznegger, W eman, Pratt,
Goetz, Hahn, and Fallon. Sturzneg
ger gained his football reputation at
Nebraska and Harvard, where he dis-
tinguished himself as an end of great
capabilities. This is his third year on
the coaching staff and it is mainly
through his efforts that the team is
so well fixed on the flanks. "Tad"
Wieman and "Gus" Goetz need no in-
troduction to Michigan football en-
thusiasts. They have played on Wol-
verine gridiron teams three and four
years, respectively, and during that
time have won for themselves much
well deserved"popularity. "Tad" and
"Gus" are now busily engaged in de-
veloping the line.
Coach Derril Pratt is a backfield
tutor. Derril is trying to teach the
boys some of the tricks he learned
while cavorting around in the back-
field of University of Alabama grid-
iron elevens. Besides being a foot-
ball player of note in his college days,
Pratt distinguished himself on the
baseball diamond. At the present
time Coach Pratt is under contract
with the Boston American baseball
nine and is regarded as a star second
baseman by all the "higher-ups" in
the major leagues. Archie Hahn, a
former Michigan track star, is the
oMcial trainer of the team and he is
ably assisted by "Billy" Fallon, the
"demon" rubber. Between the two of
them Yost's huskies are kept in the
best of condition, that is barring any
serious injuries.
Fisher Takes Reserves
Tutoring the reserves are Coaches
Fisher and Weston. Coach Fisher
hails from Middlebury college, where
he gained a reputation of being an
all-around athlete. At baseball he is
considered quite an adept and it was
after eleven years of successful pitch-
ing in the major leagues that he came

NOW

OPEN

Ann Arbor's Newest,
Largest Cafeteria.

On Last Liberty, between
State and Mraynard

MICHIGAN

I.
9~
'I

I

LOST
-- Gold fountain pen between
8 Hill and E. University :and
moeopathie Hospital. Return to
Sprick, 1008 Hill. Phone 1508-3.
ward. 25-
P-Lady's gold wrist watch. Swiss
vement, Lancet make. Thurs-
evening. Phone 1456-R. 25
-Silver Eversharp, initials H. J.
Finder please return to Daily
ce, Box H. B. 24-2
FOR RENT
RENT - Share in large .front
to. Steam heat. Desks. Plenty
hot water. Also room-mate for
ble room. Phone 1194-M. 422 E.
shington. 25
RENT-Furnished rooms, steam
ted. Inquire at 114 No. Division
25

FORS ALE
FOR SALE-One bass and one snare
drum. Good for dance work. Also
one Hammond typewriter-several
kinds of type. Call 936-W. 24-3
FOR SALE - Folding cot used five
months in private home at half-price.
Phone 1418-W. 24-2
FOR SALE-Cadillac 57 touring car.
Apply 311 Maynard St. 24-2
WANTED
WANTED-A violoncello to rent for
the winter or to buy on easy terms.
Call 274-3. 24-2
WANTED-Washing to do at home.
Will call for and deliver. Phone
7115-F13. 24-3
WANTED-Student washing and iron-
ing. Call 2569. 110 N. Ingalls
St. 22-4

Under the supervision and
mianaement of C. J. Fingerle

U

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