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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 22, 1921 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-10-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

OIN IN WELCOMING ALUMNI AND O.S.U.

IN A k I

WEATHER
tAND WARNER
TODAY

I

0,4r

3k i4rn

lIati

ASSOCIATE
PRESS
DAY AN PNI GHT
SERVICE

VOL. XXXII. No. 24

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 22, 1921

PRICE FIVE

U* 5 9RAILBOARD
TKES ATION TO
PREVENT TRIKE
CRISIS- IN NEGOTIATIONS IS MET
BY ORDER OF GOVERNMENT
TO STOP WALKOUT
CONFERENCE SET FOR
OCT.26 BETWEEN HEADS
Move is Result of Advice From Wash.
Ington That All Agencies Would.
Support Demand
(By Associated Press)
Chicago, Oct. 21.-The government
today moved to prevent a railroad
strike and to enforce obedience by
both union and railroads of decrees of
the United States labor board, the
board formally announcing that it had
received 'full . jurisdiction in the rail
crisis and ordering the workers not to
strike, pending a.conference of union
heads and rail chiefs, which is called
for Oct. 26.
Decide After Oct. 80
A decision from this conference will
not be announced until after Oct. 30,
the scheduled strike date, board mem-
bers said, declaring that in this way
a walkout will be averted unless the
unions defy the -board's orders not to
strike pending a ruling.
The action was taken following the
receipt from Washington of informa-
tion that every interested branch of
the government would back the board
in its attempt to settle the rail. dif-
ficulty, members declared.
Men Strike Tommorw
Trainmen on the International and
Great Northern, a Texas road, yester-
day decided to carry out their plans to
strike tomorrow and the maintenance
of ways in the firemen's union, repre-
senting 400,000 rail workers announc-
ed here that they would join the pro-
posed walkout Oct. 30. These two
groups are part of the 11 unions num-
bering three-fourths of the nation's
rail employees which have voted to
strike but have not issued the strike
call
If the unions choose to carry
thorugh strike plans, members of the
board said the next move would have
to come from Washington, intimating
that today's action exhausted their at-
tempt to furnish the teeth with the
transporation act.
STUDENTS TO BEAR
FROST ON OCT. 29
Robert Frost, the well known poet,
now resident in Ann Arbor, will speak
to the Unitarian Young Peoples' For-
um of Religion, Oct.. 29, on the sub-
ject of "What Do We Mean by Essen-
Vials?" At the personal request of Mr.
Frost the attendance will be limited
to members of the organization.
This is one of a series of lectures to
be delivered to the members on the
general subject, "Essentials of Life,"
which is to be the theme for the year.
A large variety of subjects for lectures
to be delivered during the course of
the year mark the program of the or-
ganization.- During the spring months
a formulation of the essentials of life
will be drawn up from the material
gleaned from the lectures, and pub-
lished.
WEARING OF COLORS AT 0.S. U.
GAME TODAY IS ADVOCATED

BEST DECORATEDC,
HOUSE TO GET. CUP
The industrious drapers of the
bunting have not labored in vain. In
addition to the pure pleasure of be-
ing "dressed up", some one of the
fraternity houses or house clubs will
soon be in possession of an attractive
silver loving cup as a reward for its
decorative ability. The awarding of
the prize will be under the supervi-
sion of the Student council and the
Homecoming day committee.
The prize was obtained through the
joint contributions of the Blu-Maize
Blossom shop, Arcade Jewelry com-
pany, Calkins-Fletcher Drug com-
pany, Quarry Drug company, Busy
Bee resturant, and Wagner and com-
pany.
NO CRALOWED NEAR0
FOOTBALL FIELD TOAY
SPECIAL PARKING SPACE PRO,
VIDED BY HIGH SCHOOL
GROUNDS
Traffic regulations for tomorrow as
issued by the police department will
close up State street from Monroe
street to McKinley avenue to all ve-
hicles. Parking around the Union
will also be prohibited and no cars
will be allowed to approach within
one block of Ferry field.
Park at Wines Field
The most convenient localities for
parking will be the streets branclling
off State street, but as parking
room is limited, all townspeople who
have homes at a short distance from
the field are asked to walk and save
the space near the football grounds
for those who are visiting from out
of town. Wines field, the high school
athletic grounds, which may be
reached from State street through
Hoover or.-Hill street, will be thrown
open to parking at a cost of 50 cents
per car. This cost will include check-
ing and core of car during the game.;
The field will take care of approxi-
mately 500 cars.
Use Nearest Entrance
Four special inclined entrances and
exits have been arranged to handle
he crowd when entering and leav-
ng the field and the athletic officials
wish to emphasize the necessity for{
using the entrance nearest the seats
occupied.

HOMECOMING

DAY

You have come back to the spot that you love. It has a
permanent place in your heart. It nurtured you while you were
changed from a boy into a man. It transformed the high school
girl into the college woman. Michigan is in very truth your
Alma Mater. On this campus you took your first chances at real
life. Those four years were packed full of experiences which
gradually enabled you to find out something about yourself and
the world. You have idealized your University. It means more
to you than you would care to express. It really seems like
home. You belong here! Today is your home-coming!?
So we do not need to welcome you. That would be too for-
mal. You are glad to be told that it seems tremendously good to
all of us to have you come back. We hope that the old home
will please you. Do not let externals disillusion you. It is the
same fine place that you came to and that you left. It must
change, just as it changed while you were here. You may not
have realized it but you did not leave the same university that
you entered.
Do not forget that the youngster you once were is running
around the campus somewhere today. If you keep your eyes
open you will encounter him or her almost anywhere. Just fre-
quent your old haunts, meet yourself, look yourself straight in
the eye and see what a real boy or girl you were -- and are.
It is worth while to renew your youth whetner you graduated
in 1921 or 1871. Someone once suggested that no man is a man
who has lost all the boy out of him.
Remember, too, that genuine sportsmanship makes real men
and women. You know now from actual experience what the
college man or woman is learning during a day such as this.
They see that a man must get into the game for all that he is
worth; that rules must be obeyed; that only thorough-going
team work will meet the test; that the best man knows how to
lose and that to the bitter end he plays to win..
Behind and beyond the game these qualities will make our
University a true home for manhood and womanhood. American
citizens will be developed here. We count upon your support
in making your university home a place where these qualities
will thrive. May this day, on and off the field, add true glory to
the name of Michigan!
M. L. BURTON, President.

REVENGE FOR TWO SUCCESSIVE
DEFEATS SOUGHT BY VARSI1TY IN
STATE BATTLE THIS AFTERNO

CALL 960 FOR SCORES

t

Results of today's football
games will be given out from the
business office of The Daily after

BuIRTON *-OUTLINES
ED0UCATION'S AIM
BE FORE PRESSMEN
SAYS DEVELOPMENT OF UNIVER-
SITY LIFE IS VITAL PART
OF AMERICA
DUTY TO MICHIGAN WILL
REQUIRE GREAT EFFORT
Opens with Expressions of Thanks to
Editors for Support Before
Legislature'

ANNOUNCES ENTRY
HALF OWNER OF DETROIT NEWS
WILL ENGAGE IN IT'S
OPERATION
CALLS SMALL PAPERS
MORAL POLICE OF U.S.

Will Give University Publicity in
itorial Columns of All His
Papers

Ed-N

Ann Arbor Music
Week Ends With
Concert Tonight
Michigan's first Music week will
come to a close with the program at
8 o'clock tonight in Pattengill audi-
torium. Interest shown this week by
the Ann Arbor public proves that as
i whole it is interested in music for
everyone and it is hoped here, as
elsewhere, that the week can be an an-,
nual event.
Features of tonight's program are
the choir of the First Metodist church,
William Wheeler, director; Mr. and
Mrs. Wheeler, tenor and soprano; Dor-
is Howe, contralto, and the high
school orchestra. The orchestra will
open the program with several martial
selections, among which will be the
"Boy Scout March" in honor of the
Ann Arbor Boy Scouts, the guests of
the evening. Dr. Stalker, of the First
Methodist church, will be the four
minute speaker and groups of child-
ren from Tappan and Eberbach
schools will give some songs.
ALUMNI ASKED TO HOME
OF PRESs BURTON TODAY

Characterizing the development of
higher education under democracy as
the most significant fact in America
today, President Marion L. Burton in
his address at the banquet of the
Press club last night declared that
he University must turn out men and
women equipped with active mind and
resolute character to meet and go
through instead of around the prob-
lems confronting American civiliza-
tion at the present time.
W1ll Betray Trust
Otherwise, he said, the University
will not prove itself worthy of the
trust placed in it by the state of
Michigan as shown in the appropria-
tions granted last spring.
Four things are necessary if this
end is to be attained, according to
President Burton. There must be
greater emphasis on the old-fashioned,
standards of painstaking accuracy
and thoroughgoing scholarship, ac-
tive intelligence must be aroused,
students must be made to reckon with
the present and future, and, finally,
they must be able to maintain public
confidence through courage to search
out the truth.
In beginning his speech, President
Burton thanked the newspaper men
for their support during the Univer-
sity's campaign for legislative appro-
priations. He assured the editors of
the desire of the University authori-
ties to co-operate with them in the
development of instr'uction in jour-
nalism.
President Burton's address con-
cluded the banquet of the editors. The
closing meeting of the convention will
be a short business session at 9:30
o'clock this morning.
Frost Reception Well Attended
More than 50 were present at the
reception given last evening by the
editorial staff of Whimsies at Betsy
Barbour dormitory in honor of Robert
Frost. The program was so arrang-
ed that the guests, every one of whom
was interested in some form of writ-
ing for its own sake, were able to
speak with the poet on rather infor-
mal terms.

7 o'clock tonight. No phones
other than 960 will be answered.
SPIRIT RUNS HIGN
ON EVE OF BATTLE
Big Pep Meeting in Hill Auditorium
Instills Fight for Ohio State
Game
CHEERS AND TALKS PROVE
THAT MICHIGAN IS READY
When cheer leader Al Cuthbert
dumped to the platform of Hill audi-
torium at 7:30 o'clock last night, the
big building was packed with a yell-
ing, cheering, coatless mob whose
minds knew only one thought-"Fight
'em, Michigan." A ripping locomotive
split the air, and the lid was off on
what old-timers agreed was one of the
most enthusiastic and spirited pep
meetings in the history of Michigan.
Assistant cheer leaders W. H. Frank-
hauser, Jr., '23L, E. K. Pilcher, '23E,
and G. A. Heath, '23E, led a cheer
each in his own particular style, after
which Willis Blasklee, '21L, Introduc-
ed Prof. R. K. Immel, of the oratory
department. Professor Immel, in a 15
minute talk, kept the crowd alternate-
ly laughing and cheering.
"Jimmy" Schermerhorn, '18, sports
editor of The Daily in 1918, and now
a newspaper man in Detroit, came
next with an old-time pep speech that
brought an ovation from the crowd.
An appeal in behalf of the cross
country team was made by the cap-
tain, F. Pemberthy, '24L, who pointed
out the fact that only nine freshmen
are out for the yearling cross coun-
try team and 20 candidates for the
Varsity. "Give Coach Farrell 200 fresh
men and he will turn out a team that
will be second to none," asserted Pemr
herthy. "But it is impossible to make
a winning team out of the small num-
ber of men now trying out."
Capt. R. Jerome "Duke" Dunne and
Frank Steketee followed Pemberthy
with short talks in which they express
ed the fighting spirit that imbues every
man on the team, most of whom were
already at home sleeping in prepara
tion for tomorrow's contest.
Coach Yost was called for, but he
'ad disapneared and could not be lo-
cated, so the crowd gave him a cheer
the band brought the house to its feet
frith "The Yellow and Blue," to close
the meeting.
Band Must Have
$500 To Start
On Illinois Trip
Five hundred dollars must be col-
'ected today if Michigan intends to
rend her band to Illinois!
Last night approximately $700 was
collected. It will take $700 more to
send the band.
Today you will meet, at various cor-
ners of the campus, men with tin
pails. They will ask you for a con-
tribution.
If you wish your band to march thti
Illinois field next Saturday, playing
the Victors, you will respond.
12 Girls Elected
To Mortarboard
Mortarboard, national honorary so-
ciety for senior women, has elected

the following 12 girls to membership.
Euphemia Carnahan, Ruth Deemer,
Harriet Gustin, Camilla Hayden, Neva
Lovewell, Joyce McCurdy, Katherine

VISITORS HAVE EDGE ON LINJ
WOLVERINE BACKFIELD
FASTEST
NEW STADIUM EXPECTEE
TO ACCOMMODATE 42,0(
Buckeyes Claim Team Is Stroge
All-around Aggregation Yet
Assembled by Wilee
When the Wolverines, led by Ca
tain "Duke" Dunne, come on Fer
field this afternoon to oppose _Obi
State in the opening Conferenceba
tie of the season they will represe
one of the greatest fighting eleve
Coach Yost has ever sent upon a grid
iron. The largest crowd that has eye
cheered for a Michigan team will fi
fthe new stadium to its full capacit
of 42,000. Spurred on by the retur
of Maddock and Cole, members of th
famous Yost point a minute machin
the Varsity is on edge for the Buc
eyes and is out to avenge- ite
against them for the defeats adminb
tered during the past two years.
Buckeyes Well Balanced
Dr. Wilce's squad of Scarlet an
Grey warriors, 43 strong, arrived thi
morning from Columbus in prime co
dition for the crucial struggle again:
the Maize and Blue. Ohio comes thi
year in a new role, that of chan
pions of the Conference. Never b
fore has an O. S. U. team appeared o
Perry field as Western champions an
the result of today's battle will larg4
ly determine whether they are to t
n the running for Big Ten honor
,again. The Buckeyes boast of th
strongest all-around team in Ohio
football history. No one man stand
out conspicuously above the rest
claim of the Ohio camp. They are a
evenly balanced 11 man team cor
sidered by Wilce to be superior to tb
elevens which included the famou
Harley to Stinchcombacombnato
O)hio State's line is made up of ;me
^nquestionably, the equal of any foi
yard wall in the West, while the bac
eld is scarcely less powerful tha
the line.
Wolverines Outweighed
To match the Scarlet and Gra
eleven Michigan's squad ,is the mo
iggressive Coach Yost has turned o
for a number of seasons. When the
ine up this afternoon the Ohio fo
ward wall will have a slight adva
Cage in experence and nearly .1
pounds to the man in weight. T
Buckeye line is almost intat froi
the championship team of last yea:
Tn the backfield Michigan is still cor
ceded an edge despite the absence e
Banks andUsher. Coach Yost is fo
unate in having two strong subst:
.utes in Uteritz and' Roby, who hav
;tepped into the veterans' places wit
out .weakening the Wolverines behin
the line.
Man for man the two elevens ai
pear nearly even and barring all ui
sets they should oppose each othe
evenly matched with the Buckeye
holding a slight advantage, on tb
line, and the Wolverines in the bac
field. Goebel, at right end, will oi
pose Captain Myers of Ohio. Bot
men are veterans and are rate
among the best in the Conferenc<
Goebel's work on the defense ha
marked his play in all of the games i
which he has taken part. Last yea
he was pitted against Slyker in th
game at Columbus. Time after tim
he piled up the Buckeye advance an
more than once stopped the runs h
the speedy Stinchcomb. Captain M
ers has done brilliant work fc
Ohio.
Huffman Shades Muiread
Stanley Muirhead will play his fir
game under Big Ten fire this afte

Arthur Brisbane, editorial writer,
and daily speaker to millions, last
night announced his entrance to
Michigan, the state.
Further, he stated that he had come
to stay; that he 'v/s one-half owner
of the Detroit Times, and that it was
his intention to make that paper's
growth one that would push or pass
any competitor.
Before "one of the most completely
representative groups of newspaper
men of Michigan ever assembled," in
the words of F. J. Ottoway, president
of the Press club of Michigan, this
message raised the tenseness of the
audience to a pitch seldom reached
by any speaker.
"The University of Michigan need
have no fear such as was expressed
by its President tonight-'That if this
fails - speaking of the University -
democracy cannot be a success.
"'This University is a succes3,.and
democracy is a success.'
University Important Factory
'Newspaper men of this country
have been mightily interested in De-
troit, tiie fastest growing city in the
world. They are interesated in it be-
cause of its immense factories, and
their consequent production. But I
shall tell them through my columns
that the only important factory of this
state is not at Detroit, but here, at
this University.
"In the words of Dante, 'Give light
and the people will find their own
road'. This is the lighthouse. Col-
leges make men. They are the fac-
tories of democracy."
Brisbane Talks to Millions
Brisbane daily talks to millions of
people. He does not know how many
millions. Not only does he write the
column "Today", which appears simul-
taneously in Los Angeles, Chicago,
Atlanta, Milwaukee, San Francis-
co and Detroit, but he writes
an editorial for his evening papers,
and a longer one each Sunday. Yet,
despite this tremenodus circulation,
Mr. Brisbane referred to the papers
of smaller circulation, of two or
(Continued on Page Twelve)

It has been suggested that Michigan
rooters at the game today wear some
sort of identification so that they may
be distinguished from O. S. U. support-
ers, who will likely come decked in
scarlet and grey. If you have some
pieces of maize and blue ribbon pin
them on your coat lapel this after-
noon, if you have no ribbon a made up
combination of maize and blue may be
purchased at the Jane Singleton shop
in Nickel's arcade.
I -
FREE MOVIES TONIGHT
Through the courtesy of the
management, the Arcade and
Majestic theaters will give a
free show to students and visit-
ors beginning at 10 o'clock to-
night. The regular features will

After the Michigan-Ohio State game
until 7 o'clock tonight, President Mar-
ion L. Burton and Mrs. Burton will be
"'at home" to alumni in the city for
the game. They also especially in-
vite Michigan alumni who are mem-
bers of the various faculties to take
this occasion to call at the President's
house and to bring with them friends
who may be visiting Ann Arbor.
President Burton and Mrs. Burton
wish in this way to make an opportun-
ity for renewing old college friend-
ships among those who are returning
to the campus and those who have not

noon when he
Huffman, the

opposes former Cal
Buckeye left ta

Huffman is probably the strong(
man on the Ohio wall and has, a c
cided advantage over Muirhead in e
perience although in the games t
year Stan has been adept in flippi
through opposing lines. Huffman b
an advantage in weight in addition
his experience of three years.

Montgomery, Margaret Schnaple, Mar- Jc
garet Spalding, Doris Sprague, Hazel one
Storz, and Elsie Townsend. whe
Initiation will take place on Sun- ley.
day, Nov. 7.

ohns at right guard will undf
of the biggest jobs of his <
n he opposes the 225 pound

(Continued on

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