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October 19, 1921 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-10-19

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'FATHER
kND COOLER
)DAY

I

r

AbP
an

til

ASSC
P
DAY AND

No. 21.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNE DAY, OCTOBER 19, 1921

PRICE F

TE RA-TI fIES~
ROlY, AUSTRlI
GARY TREATIES

11

ACTION
U.

BRINGS HARMONY
S. AND PRINCIPAL
ENEMIES

'to

ADMINISTRATION PEACE
PROGRAM IS COMPLETE
Democratic Effort to Substitute Ter-
salles Agreement
(By Associated Press) .
Washington, Oct. 18.-The adminis-
tration peace treaties with Germany.
Austria and Hungary were ratified by
the senate tonight. The vote on the
first two being 66 to 20, or 8 more
than the necessary two-thirds and in,
the case of the Hungarian treaty, due
to the absence of three senators, be-
ing 66 to 17.
Uomplete Pegce Program
The senate action completed the ad-:
ministration's immediate peace pro-
gram and brought a full state of:
peace with the principal enemy pow-
era. Remaining now are only the
formal exchanges of ratification ex-
oept in the case of the Hungarian
treaty and that government alone has
yet to complete parliamentary action
on the treaty.
Only three republicans-Senators
Borah of Idaho, LaFollette of Wiscon-
sin, and Norris of Nebraska, who was
absent on account of illness, was
paired against ratification, voted
against the treaty. Fourteen Demo-
crats, on the other hand, supported
the treaty, while two more were pair-
ed in favor of ratification.
Democratic Effort Falls
Before action was taken a Demo-
cratic effort to substitute, for the
German treaty, the treaty of -Ver-
sailles with the 12 Lodge reservations,
was defeated, and the foreign rela-
tions committee reservation prohibit-
ing American membership on the al-
lied reparations commission or any;
other international commission with-
£It the consent of congress were1
adpted.
RECEPTION WILL
BE GIVEN FROST
Robert Frost, poet, is to be tendered1
a reception Friday evening, Oct. 21,
at Betsey Barbour house by the edi-
torial staff of Whimsies, campus liter-
ary publication.c
It is the purpose of the originators
of the plan not to put the poet on ex-
hibition, but to permit those most in.-
terested to meet him on intimate
terms. To this end the rhetoric fac-
ulty have been consulted, and invi-
tations will be sent to such students
as are most interested in writing for
its own sake.
Plans have been so devised as to
permit the guests to meet Mr. Frost in4
groups of 8 or 10, and converse with
him informally. The sponsors of the
affair hope in this way to allow a
large number of students who ' are
especially interested to become per-
sonally acquainted with the poet.
MOORE, STALEY ON FIRST
MUSIC WEEK PROGRAM HEREt
Features of tonight's program oft
Michigan's First Music week at 81
o'clock in Pattengill auditorium con-t
sist of a choir selection by the choirl
of the First Congregational church, c
Earl V. Moore, organist and conduct-c
or; school number by students of the
Perry school; student number bye
Carol Pierson, soprano; four. minutet
address by Dr. A. A. Stanley; artist
number by Nora B. Wetmore, mezzo-t
contralto; selections by the Highc
School Girls' Glee club, George Oscar

Bowen, conductor, and communityr
singing by everybody.
Poster Designers Meet Shuter
Mon interested in designing the pos-t
ter for the 1921 Union opera, "Makef
It For Two", will meet with E. Mor-
timer Shuter at 4 o'clock this aft-f
ernoon in room 308, Union.
The men are asked to bring pen-e
cil and paper for the nurnose of tak-s

liauer Will Open
Series Thursday
Harold Bauer, master pianist, will
open the Choral UnionConcert series
at 8-o'clock tomorrow night in Hill
auditorium. He is an artist who has
been received enthusiastically by Ann
Arbor audiences in past years and
interest in his recital this year is
causing unusual interest.
Bauer came to this country for the
fi'rst time in 1900, when he played
with the Boston Symphony orchestra.
Since that time herhas played with
every symphony orchestra in the
country. He is a master of the tech-{
nical difficulties of his art and his in-
terpretation is extraordinary.
Individual tickets for this concert
may be 'obtained at the School of
Music.
ICLUB HREADY FOR J
Pres. E. J. Ottaway Opens Convention
at 8:80 O'clock Tomorrow
Afternoon
PROGRAM WILL INCLUDE ALL
PROBLEMS OF JOURNALISMt

CITY PREPARES TO-
WI'THSTAND STRIKE
University Coal Pile Large Enough to
Meet Requirements Until
March
WHOLESALE MERCHANTS HAVE
TRUCKING SYSTEM ORGANIZED
If the threatned country-wide rail-
road strike scheduled for Oct. 30 ma-
terializes, the University and the city
of Ann Arbor will not be entirely un-
prepared, according to information
obtained yesterday from various
sources.
At the department of buildings and
grounds it was stated that 18,000
tons of coal are now on hand, a sup-,
ply which is expected to fill all fuel
requirements of the University until
next March. In addition, 9,000 more
tons are in transit, though the ques-
tion of how much of this will be de-
livered before Oct. 30 is problemati-
cal.
Herbert Sylvester, district agent of
the Detroit Edison company, said
that he had no official information
other than the statement of Alex Dow,
president of the company, that a 10
weeks' supply of coal is all that can
be definitely assured. -
"If the strikte actually takes place,
we must begin economizing at once,"
asserted Mr. Sylvester. "The public
will have to co-operate with us in
the curtailment of all unnecessary
use of power, so that the limited
amount of fuel will last until the'
strike is settled."
In regard to the maintenance of the
food supply, one of the city's leading
wholesale merchants explained that
the merchants of Ann Arbor already
have a trucking system whereby food
is brought from Detroit. Plans to'
keep in touch with the surrounding
country by motor truck have already7
been made. In case of a rail strike,
this trucking system can be enlarg-
ed, so as to assure a supply of all
necessary foods for two or three
weeks, and of canned goods for at
least two months.,

DISCUSS RESEARCH
AT JOINT, MEETING
Unity and co-operation among re-
search organizations on the campus
was the proposition contained in a
paper entitled "Sigma Xi at Michi-
gan - a History and a Vision," read
by Prof. E. C. Case, of the paleontol-
ogy department, before a joint meet-
-ing of the Sigma Xi and the Junior
Research club last night in the Nat-
ural Science auditorium.
The joint meeting last night was
addressed by President Marion L.
Burton, who spoke on the subject of
"The Future of Research at the Uni-
versity of Michigan.". President
Burton outlined the four factors, up-
on which the future of the work de-
pended as: The relation between re-
search work and teaching methods,
the curious evolution through which
education in America is passing, the
official encouragement 'given the work
by the Regents, and the man himself
who is in the work.'
The official recognition of the Re-
gents was brought.out by a review of
the steps taken by that body last
year in establishing a department of
engineering research, and in forming
a method of using the money obtain-
ed for the work.
HUDEOPATHIC SCHOOL
OBSERVES_,CLINIC' DAY
National Homoeopathic Clinic day
was observed by the local hospital yes-
terday, by a series Qf medical and sur-
gical clinics held throughout the
morning and afternoon and a dinner7
given by the faculty of the Homoeo-I
pathic Medical school for all visiting
physicians, students in registration,
and pre-medical students. More than
25 physicians from various parts of the
state attended the clinics.
More than 125 attended the banquet,
which was held at the Union last
night. President Burton gave a short
address to the students of the Homoeo-
pathic Medical. school, urging co-oper-,
ation between the various schools of1
the University, and emphasizing thef
fact that learning and culture are of
far more importance to the University
than all of the material prosperity
which has received so much attention
in the past few months.
Dr. Wood, the principal speaker of
the evening, described conditions of
the University at fthe time curing{
which he attended the Homoeopathic
Medical school, telling of the strug-
gles of the school and of the meager
faculty of four doctors'atthat time.
He streissed the importance of the
medical profession..

ADVISERS NOTICE

BULLETIN
Prof. L. I. Brumm, of the rhetoric
department, verified the report that
Arthur Bisbane, noted editorial writ.
er will be In Ann Arbor during the
University press conference. Accord-
ing to Professor Brumm, Mr. Brisbane
will reach Ann Arbor Friday afternoon
and attend the .conference banquet
Friday night.
With the completion of the program
for the annual meeting of the Uni-
versity Press club of Michigan, which
Is to be held here from Thursday to
Saturday of this week, everything is
In readiness for the newspaper men
of the state when they begin to ar-
rive here tomorrow morning.
Included on the program are ad-
dresses and discussions covering all
the problems of the present day jour-
alistic field from the metropolitan
daily to the country weekly. A num-
ber of questions have been outlined
for the discussion of the editors at the
more informal segions. Among the
questions suggested for considera-
tion are the different phases of news-
paper ethics, the status of the school
of journalism and its relation to the
press, and the opportunities in differ-
ent fields for the college trained news-.
paper man.
Registration of the delegates will
occupy the forenoon tomorrow. At
noon each division of the state press
will lunch by itself in the Union
private rooms. Following luncheon,
each section will be given until 3:30
o'clock to discuss its own affairs.
The formal openin of the conven-
tion will be at 8:30 o'clock, when E.
J. Ottaway, president of the club, de-
ilvers the address of welcome,. a
STUDENT TICKETS FOR 0. S. U.
GAME MAILED LAST NIGHT
Alumni and Students Divide Choice
Seats, Eah Iteceiving
1,000
Student, tickets for the Ohio State
game were mailed last night. Alumni
tickets wee posted Monday night and
Tuesday. An even distribution of
tickets among the alumni and students
has caused a number of the students
to receive tickets in the west stand,
but they have been distributed by
classes according to a Student coun-
cil arrangement.
Mails from and in Ann Arbor were
quite congested because of the un-
usually heavy burden placed upon the
local postofice. More than 10.000
letters were sent out by the Athletic
office with tickets.
According to Fielding H. Yost, di-
rector of intercollegiate athletics, the
division of tickets between the alumni
and students was almost equal, each
group taking ' approximately 15,000
with each individual entitled to order
four tickets.
. Ohio State supporters have taken
6,000' tickets, situated in the north
stand from the 50 yard line to the
east end. Members of the "M" club
and the faculty have seats on aboutl
thrAN &VA76%

$52,984 County's Share of Budget
Ann Arbor and Washtenaw county
will payr$52,984 toward the mainten-
ance of the University this year. That
amount is Washtenaw county's appor-
tionment of the $3,000,000 set aside
in the state tax fund for the Univer-
sity. Washtenaw will also contribute
$1,188 toward the $67,280 appropriated
the state psychapathic hospital, locat-
ed here. ,

G~[N -N9-4ICls RLRL UNIONS UNITE EFFORTS I
I_ PREVENT TRANSPORTATION THl

Upperclass advisers are asked
to mail the postcard enclosed
with their list of freshmen. This
is for therpurpose of checking the
receipt of each list. Some ad-
visers have failed to do so.
W. W. GOWER, '22,
General Chairman, Upperclass
Advisers.
SUNOWALL HEADS NEW
HEALTHDEPATMENT
INTRAMURAL SPORTS, WOMEN'S
PHYSICALtEDUCATION
ARE GROUPED
With the establishment of the de-
partment of hygiene and public health
under the direction of Dr. John Sund-
wall, for three years head of a simi-
lar, but not ag extensive, department
at the University of Minnesota, the
University of Michigan has made a
long stride forward in clearing up the
much mooted problem of student
health.
In addition to the department of
hygiene and public health, there has
been also instituted a department of
students' physicl welfare, under
which will be grouped the old depart-
ments of the health service, women's
physical education, and Intramural
athletics.
The department of student's physi-
cal welfare has as its principal aim
the participation of every student in
some form or other of physical exer-
cise. To this end it will be greatly
aided by the intramural department
and the department of women's physi-
cal education. Its aim will be to help
each student entering the University
to develop and maintain an active,
healthy, and efficient body, not only
during the years spent at college, but
in later life as well.
The department of hygiene and pub-
lic health will be far reaching in its
benefits. It is the hope of Dr. Sund-
wall that at some time in the future
a scientific course in health promotion
will be required of every student in
each department of the University.,
The department will pay attention
to the matter of students' living con-
ditions, and regular inspections of
rooming houses, restaurants, board-
ing houses, fraternities, and clubs are
planned, as well as inspections of
milk, food, and water supplies, paying
particular attention to the physical
condition of those in charge of serv-
ing food. Dr. Sundwall's work is
sure to be of great value to the Uni-
versity, for better health will mean a
better, harder working student body.
DECORATIONS WILL
WELCOME VISITORS
Street decorations will play a prom-
inent part in expressing Michigan's
spirit of welcome to all her alumni
and friends next Saturday. Banners of
welcome, Ohio State, and Michigan
colors will be hung across all roads
entering Ann Arbor and in all the
principal streets around the campus.
Fraternity houses will be decorated
and the merchants of the city have
united in offering a cup to the house
which makes the best appearance.
During the game in the afternoon
special cheers and demonstrations
will be given and it is likely that a
snake dance or street parade will take
place after the game. All the ar-
rangements for the occasion are in

the hands of a committee of the Stu-
dent council.
PRES. BURTON WILL SPEAK
AT INAUGURATION THURSDAYI
President Marion L. Burton leaves
today for Ithaca,.N. Y., where he is to
deliver an address Thursday, Oct. 20,
on the occasioan of the inauguration
of President Farrand, of Cornell uni-?

FIRST MOVE FROM PUBLIC T
AVERT STRIKE CAME
FROM FARMERS
UNIONS AND BOARD SFT
THURSDAY FOR PARLE
Freight Rate Reductions, Revision 01
Wage Scale Subjects of
Petitions
(By Associated Press)
Chicago, Oct. 18.-Efforts to averi
the nation-wide rail strike scheduled
for Oct. 30 tonight found governmn-
tal agencies, representatives of the
public, and some railway labo
unions taking action simultaneous3
with, hope to prevent a tieup "C
the country's transportation systen-
through a walkout of 2,000,000 em-
ployes, in protest of wage cuts.
Labor Board Calls Parley
Foremost among the moves being
made by the different groups was s
meeting between the United State
railroad labor board and the heads
of the five unions, which have al-
ready authorized their men to strike
called for Thursday by the board and
at the request of President. Harding
The first move on the part of a pub-
lic organization to avert a strike came
when the American farm bureau fed-
eration, representing 1,250,000 farm-
ers sent petitions to the interstate
commerce commission asking an im-
mediate 10 .to 20 per cent reduction
in freight rates on necessities and an-
nounced it also would appeal to the
labor board not to grant a new 10 per
cent wage reduction which the roads
have announced they will seek, bul
rather to generally revise wages ii
accordance with the cost of living it
various sections.
Union Leaders Called
The union leaders called in by the
labor board were W. S. Carter, pres-
ident of the brotherhood of locomno-
tive firemen and enginemen; Warrea
S. Stone, president of the brotherhood
of locomotive engineers; William Lee,
president of the brotherhood of rail-
road trainmen; L. E. Sheppard, pres-
ident of the order of railway conduct-
ors, and T. C. Pashen, president of
the switchmen's union of North
America.
SPECIAL CAR FOR
WOMEN TO URBANA
In addition to the cars carrying
men students on the Illinois football
special, one car especially reserved
for women will be added to the train.
All women who intend to go to the
game should sign up for tickets im-
mediatly on the bulletin board on
Barbour gymnasium. Arrangements
are being made for the accommoda-
tion of Detroit alumni on the train,
and also Ann Arbor alumni, resi-
dents, alumni and faculty members in
an effort to make the train an All-
Michigan affair.
The trip, which will be made over
the Michigan Central and the Illinois
Central railroads, will cost $12.14
round trip and '$3.24 and $4.05 each
way for upper and lower Pullman
berths, respectively.
LUDWIG, THIRD, FORMER KING
OF BAVARIA REPORTED DEAD
London, Oct. 18.-An exchange tele-
gram from Vienna today states that a
report has been regelved there of the
death of Ludwig Third, former king of
Bavaria atSarvar castle in Hungary.
Ludwig lived a picturesque life in
Europe for three quarters of a cen-
tury, renounced his throne as king of
Bavaria on Nov. 16, 1916, after holding

it a scant three years. After his ab-
dication Ludwig fled to Switzerland
and afterward to the Tyrol with oth-
er members of his household.
Alpha Nu Will Meet Thursday Nighi
Due to the mass meeting which will
be held on Friday night, the regulai
I meeting of Alpha Nu will be held al
7:30 o'clock on Thursday night of this
week.
Tryouts among Alpha Nu men foi
places on the Varsity debating tean
are scheduled to take place on Wed
nesday evening, Oct. 26, in the Alpha

Campus Welcomes Issue Of Chimes
Dealing With Football And Alumni

(By Marion Kerr) :
After a leisurely summer taken up
with non -atmospheric ° periodicals
Michigan welcomed back its All-cam-
pus magazine, "Chimes", yesterday
)norning with considerable gusto.
Appropriate to early fall interests,;
the issue is turned over to football.'
On the cover the football satellites,7
Kipke, Swan, and Muirhead, hold typ-
ical scrimmage postures before an
orange colored sunset. Football eman-i
ates from the pages of the magazine
like the smell of leaves in autumn.c
Behind it, through it, and in it is the
good old Michigan spirit, true foot-
ball spirit, the kind that is helpingt
the smile on Coach Yost's face this
par.
The Duke Contributes
nropriately, the leading article is
by' .ake Dunne - Michigan's fight-]
ing ftAball captain, and with it a full
page sn tch of the "Cap'n" by Jamese
C. House, Jr. In his "Class of '25 -
Why Are You Here?" Dunne impartsl
to this year's group of verdure cer-
tain elements of freshman spirit nec-E
essary to the well-being of unhazed
freshmen.
As a decided;coup d' etat for this is-
sue is Edwin Denby's article, in real-
ization of the fact that our secretary9
of the navy is a former Michigan
man. Strangely enough the article is
not on building ships and building
men, nor similar interesting plati-;
tudes, but on football, good old Mich-]
igan football, as played way back in
the rough-and-tumble football days ofi
'95, and as played by Edwin Denby.i
In spite of his modesty on the point,

kind of philosophy Michigan stands
for. It is typified in his title, "The
Games' the Thing".
Almni Featured
And not only hae "Chimes" delv-
ed into the past for Secretary Denby's
football career, but Robert E. Adams,
Jr., '23, in his article on "Where Are
They Now?" brings back "Willie"
Heston, "Germany" Schulz, and other
old-time football stars.
It seems, however, that rummaging
in the ancient files was not limited
to football men alone, for Michigan's
oldest living alumnus has let out the
secret of the way to be healthy at
94. He is Dr. G. Carter of Boilder,
Col., interviewed by Wade P. Connell,
'21. Along with his health, Dr. Car-
ter still apparently keeps his Michi-
gan spirit - to him an asset as good
as, and entirely conducive to - his
health.
Health again leads us to the long-
est article in the magazine, "Health--
An Asset or a Liability", by Dean
Hugh Cabot of the Medical school, in'
which he outlines sleep. food and ex-
ercise in their proper and individual
proportions as the makers or break-
ers of health.
But away from the most potential
consideration of health and football
is the lighter side of "Chimes", its
fiction department, riot with love and
"proletariat" ideals as voiced in "De-
ception De Luxe'", an Interesting
story with a rather puzzling ending.
Herbert S. Case's story, "The Second
Death of Beatrice", has a hair-raising
relationship to {Edgar Allan Poe. Cle-
ment A. Smith has also contributed a
whimsical bit of verse, "The Univer-

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