100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 18, 1921 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-10-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

i

THE WEATHER
PROBABLY SHOWERS
TODAY

Sir Q3UU

Iiaiti

ASSOCIATE
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT
SERVICE

VOL. XXXII. No. 19, ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 18, 1921 PRICE FIV CE]

GOERNMENT CAN
PREVENT STE
SYS RAIL CHIEF,
U. S. SHOULD TAKE OVER ROADS,
ACCORDING TO HEAD OF
ENGINEERS
"BIG FIVE" LEADERS '
WILL CONVENE TODAY
Breaking Down of Hard Won Working
Rules Worse Than Cut In
Wages, Says Labor Man
(By Associated Press)
Cleveland, Oct. 17.-The progressive
railroad strike scheduled to begin Oct.
30 can be settled by the railroads or
prevented by the government, Warren
S. Stone, president of the Brotherhood
of Locomotive engineers said tonight
when asked his opinion of the situa-
tion. Mr. Stone said the causes of the
strike is largely because of the ac-
tion of railroad managers in request-
ing a further 10 per cent wage reduc-
tion and the elimination of favorable
working agreements on upwards of 75
roads, in addition to the 12 per cent
wage reduction which went into effect
July 1. The railroads can settle the
strike by elimination of these condi-
tions, Mr. Stone said.
Believes Strike Is Wanted
"The goverment can prevent the
strike by taking over the railroads and
this is what will happen eventually,"
Mr. Stone said.
Mr. Stone said he believed that the
railroads "want a strike and that a
further reduction in wages is much
.iess desirable to the railroad execu-
tives than the abrogation of rules and
regulations won by employees in var-
ious ways as the result of years of
organized effort."
"If it had been iX question of wage
reduction only, there would have been
no strike," Mr. Stone said, adding that
he has from 75 to 100 letters giving in-
stances of attempts by several differ-
eint roads to break down working rules
that have been secured by arbitration,
by decision of the railroad labor board
and in other ways.
Does Not Affect Small Lines
"The Big Five" chiefs or their rep-
resentatives will convene tomorrow
to consider matters pertaining to the
strike. Just what will be discussed,
Mr.,Stone wasunable to state to-
night, adding that the situation in
general will be reviewed. The strike
wil not affect the so-called short line
railroads, it was explained by W. G.
Lee, president of the Brotherhood of
Railroad Trainmen, inasmuch as they
were not affected by the wage in-
creases and reductions in which the
large roads figure.
FORESTERS COMMENCE- YEAR'S
ACTIVITIES WITH CAMP FIRE
The annual All-forester camp fire
will open the social year for the for-
estry classes tomorrow night.
Foresters are to meet at the D. U.
R. station Wednesday afternoon in
time to leave at 5:50 o'clock for the
Saginaw Forest, where the camp fire
will be held in the evening. While
thes camp fire is for all members of
the forestry classes, it is especially
desired to have all freshmen present
for this first meeting of the year
Prof. Filibert Roth of the forestry de-
partment will have charge of the

party.'

Technicalexcellence Characterizes
Opening Concert For Music Week

IHOMOEOPS GATHER
ii FOR "CLINIC 0DAY"

(By Sydney Coates)
With every number executed with
technical excellence the first concert
on the Faculty series and the first
formal program of Michigan's First,
Music week came to a successful close
Sunday afternoon in Hill auditorium.
Community singing and special fea-
tures will mark this eiening's pro-
gram in Pattengill auditorium.
Albert Lockwood opened Sunday
afternoon's program with Chopin's
"Fantasie, Opus 49". The interpreta-
tion given the work was one full of
vitality and color in which technical
difficulties were marshaled by the
pianist with ease and precision. Of
the other works played by Mr. Lock-
wood perhaps the "Pastorale Variee"
of Mozart brought the most apprecia-
tion from the audience.
Nora Hunt Sings
Nora Crane Hunt sang Stevenson's
TICKETS FOR ILLINOIS
TRIP SO ON SALE TODAY,
FARE COSTS $12.14 PROVIPING 800
STUDENTS tAKE
JOURNEY
Providing that at least 300 stu-
dents sign up immediately as passen-
gers, a special train will be run to
Champaign, Ill., and return on the
day of the Michigan-Illinois football
game.
Exchange tickets will go on sale
at 1 o'clock this afternoon at the
Union desk. These tickets will be
exchanged for the regular railroad

"Arioso: Salutation of the Dawn", a
rendering of an old Sanskrit poem
full of the strange but true prophecy
of the East. Miss Hunt's full, color-
ful voice with the violin obligato
by Marian Struble and accompani-
ment by Clara Lundell, made a pleas-
ing combination. Miss Hunt's other
three numbers and especially the
"Hindoo Love Song" of Bemberg
brought strong applause.
The third division of the program
was played by Samuel Pierson Lock-
wood, head of the violin department
of the School of Music. His rendering
of Mendelssohn's entire "Concerto,
Opus 64", showed his mastery of the
violin in his clean cut execution of
the passages of this great composer.
Mr. Lockwood's work was supple-
mented by excellent accompanying on
the part of Mrs. Maud Okkelberg.
Topight's Program
Features of the second program,
which will be given at 8 o'clock to-
night in Pattengill auditorium, are
numbers by Frank L. Thomas, bari-
tone; -Miss Louella Ensworth, so-
prano; the Varsity quartet; school
number from the Jones and Donovan
schools, and community singing. The
Rotary club will be guests of honor
and Charles A. Sink the four minute
speaker.
Demn FrIore,
Rooms Is Urgent
At least 200 more rooms will be
urgently needed to accommodate out-
of-town visitors for the Ohio State
game next Saturday. The Ohio State
rooming committee of the Union has
over 450 unfilled requests for rooms

Practitioners Invited to Program
Ward Inspections,
Lectures

ofI

WOODS, '79H, SPEAKS THIS
EVENING AT UNION BANQUET
National Homoeopathic Clinic oday
will be observed today at the Univer-
sity Homoeopathic hospital, in ac-
cordance with the movement fostered
by the American Institute of Hom-
oeopath.
Invitations have been sent to prac-
titioners throughout the state and a
large attendance is expected inas-
much as the local establisment is- the
only Homoeopathic hospital in Michi-
gan.
D. W. Springer, superintendent of
the hospital, has arranged a program
including ward inspections and surg-
ical clinics treating with technical
subjects.
Dr. James C. Wood, '79H, formerly
professor of gynecology here, will be
the speaker of the evening at the ban-
quet given by the faculty of the
school at 7 o'clock in the Union for
all visiting physicians, students in
registration, students in pre-medical
courses and friends.

SPEAK ERS ADVISE
HOUSE PRESIDENTSj
More than 50 women attended the
annual supper for the presidents of
University league houses given by
Dean Myra B. Jordan last night in
Barbour gymnasium. Dean Jordan
spoke of the unusual opportunities
afforded league house women since
they comprise fully five-eighths of the
women on the campus.
Mrs. Marion L. Burton, as guest of
honor,' reminded the girls that they
must stand up and bear their respon-
sibilities individually and as a group.
Edna Groff, '22, president of the
Women's league, pointed out how the
house rules were really made by the
girls themselves, and that they were
for this reason easy to abide. Joyce
McCurdy, '22, vice-president of the
league; Milred Sherman, '21, assist-
ant to the dean; and Margaret McIn-
tyre, '23, chairman of Junior advis-
ors, explained in part their work.
NlAs BEIN GMADE FOR
PRESS C.LUB CONVENTION
EDITORS TO ATTEND SMOKER AT
UNION THURSDAY AFTER
CONCERT
Members of the Students' Press club.
are making final plans for assisting in
the entertainment of the newspaper
men and women who will be in Ann
Arbor from Thursday to Saturday of
this week in attendance at the an-
nual convention of the University'
Press club of Michigan.
For several days volunteer commit-
tees of students working under the
direction of Donald Hamilton Haines,
instructor in the journalism depart-
ment, have been canvassing different
sections of the city to secure rooms
for the visitors.
When the delegates begin to arrive
on Thursday morning they will be
met at the train by a student recep-
tion committee. It is planned to se-
cure autos to convey the delegates to
the Union, where they will register
for the meetings.
Other members of the Press club
will serve as guides to conduct the
visitors around the campus.
After the Choral Union concert
Thursday night, the delegates will be
entertained at a smoker given inthe
Union by members of the Press
club.
ASSISTANT CHEERING
LEADERS APPOINTED

OFFICERS ELECTED
BY -TWO CLASSES,
OTHERS NOMINATE
JUNIOR LAW NOMINATIONS POST-
PONED BECAUSE OF'
INELIGIBILITIES
SENIOR AND FRESHMAN
LAWS PICK CANDIDATES
Report of First Year Medics Found
Inaccurate Due to Mistake
of Tellers
Class officers were elected yesterday
by the sophomore medics and junior
dents, while nominations were made
by senior, junior and freshman laws.
Freshman lits, the last class to nom-
inate, will meet for that purpose at
4 o'clock Thursday afternoon in Uni-
versity hall. The law classes will
hold their elections on Wednesday.
Sophomore medics elected R. L.
Mustard, president; L. O. Kappes,
vice-president; E. N. VanOrnum, sec-
retary; and L. A. Brunsting, treas-
urer.
Junior dents elected J. H. Shackle-
ford, president; R. G. Alexander, vice-
president; L. B. Purdy,'secretary; and
E. F. Mast, treasurer.

tickets at the Michigan Central de- from alumni and its available supply

pot as soon as the original 300 trialj
tickets have been disposed of at the
Union. The round trip passenger fare
will be $12.14, which is equal to an
ordinary one way fare.l
Pullman Fares $4.06
Pullman fares will be $4.05 each1
way for a lower berth, $3.24 for an
upper berth and two men may use one
berth if so desired. Arrangements4
for sleepers should be made when
the exchange tickets are turned in at
the station. A drawing room, ac-
conmodating three people, is quoted
at $14.58. The train, which will 'be
composed of entirely first class all
steel equipment including day coaclf-
es, pullsmans and a club car, will
leave the Michigan Central station at
10 o'clock Friday night, Oct. 28, the
night before the game, arriving at 8
o'clock Saturday morning in Cham-
paign. The special will leave for the
return trip Saturday night, arriving1
in Ann Arbor Sunday morning, the
hours to be announced later.
Can Stop in Chicago
By special arrangement anyone who
wishes to spend Sunday in Chicago,
may do so by taking a regular train
(upon which the return ticket will be+
accepted) into Chicago after the game
and then taking a Michigan Central
out of Chicago to Ann Arbor. The spe-
cial tickets expire at midnight Sun-;
day night and the technicality of
whether the passenger must be aboard
or at his destination at that hour
will be explained later in The Daily.
FRANCIS J. LENNON, '2SE,
DIES FROM APPENDICITIS
Francis J. Lennon, '23E, died at
11:05 o'clock Sunday in a local hospit-
al,'following an operation for appen-
dicitis.
The deceased was ill for a week fol-
lowing the operation. His father and
mother were with him during his ill-
ness and accompanied the body on the
5:30 o'clock train yesterday morning
to their home in Cleveland.

is virtually exhausted.
Persons having spare rooms are ur-
gently requested to list these with theI
committee at once. Those desiring to
list rooms should leave their address,
telephone numbers and prices with
the committee at the Union. These1
rooms are requested for alumni, and
students who have friends or relatives
who are coming for the game are re-
quested by the committee to make
their own arrangements for rooms.
News of the Day
IN BRIEF
New York, Oct. 17.-F. D. Under-
wood, president of the Erie railroad,
tonight expressed the hope that the
strike would actually occur. "This is
the time and the place for it," he de-
clared, adding that the strike was one
against the "umpire" of the United
States railroad labor board.
Boston, Oct. 17.-The Brotherhood
of Railroad Station employes as an in-
dependent organization will probably
take action similar to that of the Big
Four brotherhood in the event a walk-
out of members of the latter organi-
zation is ordered, P. J. Hoyle, presi-
dent of the station employes' organi-
zation, said today.
New York, Oct. 17. -- More than
9,000,00 automobiles will be available
for emergency use if the railroad
strike called for Oct. 30 goes into ef-
fect, Alfred Reeves, general manager
of the national automobile chamber of
commerce, declared in a statement
today.
Washington, Oct. 17.-All efforts to
amend the administration's peace
treaty with Germany were defeated in
the senate today and leaders an-

Organizing New
University Choir
Work of organizing the new Univer-
sity choir is progressing steadily, and
it is expected that the choir will make
its first public appearance at the Sun-
day evening service on Nov. 6 in Hill
auditorium.
IThechoir, under the direction of
George Oscar Bowen of the School of
Music, will be composed of 70 women
and 30 men. Mr. Bowen has had con-
siderable experience in leading large
community choruses. It is the plan
of the University service committee
to use the choir at all Sunday evening
services after its first appearance.
Try-outs for the new musical or-
ganization should see Mr. Bowen at 4
o'clock Thursday at Lane hall. The
University service committee desires
to have a large number of try-outs
report, and states that no great
amount of musical talent will be ex-
pected of those desiring to join the
choir. Freshmen are not eligible.It
is planed to hold the first rehearsal
Wednesday, Oct. 26, in Lane hall aud-
itorium.
OCTOBER ISSUE OF CHIMES
APPEARS ON CAMPUS TODAY
Chimes, All-campus opinion month-
ly, will appear on sale today on the
campus. The October number is de-
voted largely to football, dealing with
teams and players of the past and the
present.
LOCAL ATTORNEY CHARGED
WITH MISREPRESENTATION
Andrew J. Sawyer,8 a well known
criminal, lawyer of Ann Arbor, must
appear in Judge Collingwood's court'
Oct. 29 to defend himself on a charge
of "unprofessional and improper con-
duct and of unlawful conduct as an
attorney and counselor at law".
Prof. A. H. White Confined to Home
Prof. A. H. White, head of the chem-
ical engineering department, is con-
fined to his home for several days due
to a slight sprain he sustained Sun-
day afternoon. His condition, how-
ever, is not serious.
Phi Sigma Meets Today
Phi Sigma will hold its first regular
business meeting in'room 231 Natural
Science building at 7 o'clock today.
New officers will be elected, and all
members are urged to be present.

Three Tie for President
Senior laws chose the following
nominees: For vice-president, L. A.
Parker; for secretary, .. C. Davis; for
treasurer, C. A. Spiess. Since these
men had no opposition for the nomi-
nation, they were declared elected.
Three candidates were tied for pres-
ident: 0.J.Watts, F. D. Carroll .and
H. C. Wilson, and a special ballot
will be taken on these three men from
9 to 12 o'clock Wednesday morning
in the corridor of the Law building.
In the junior law nominations, so
many of the candidates were found
ineligible that the Student council has
ordered another meeting for nomina-
tions to be held at 1:15 o'clock Wed-
nesday afternoon in room C. Law
building, at which'time elections will
also be made.
Laws' Nominations
Freshman laws nominated for pres-
ident: Francisco Penberthy and F.
W. Speer;- for vice-president, Gladys
Wells and T. F. Moran; for secretary
W. M. Seelye and 0. A. Brown; for
treasurer, J. A. Starr and S. R. Bid-
well.
The first report of the freshman
medic election was later found to
have been incorrect, due to an error
of the tellers in the first count. The
official list follows: President, H. A
Vick; vice-president, C. A. Hoffman;
secretary, Nellie Zwemer; and treas-
urer, A. H. Steele.
lail Ohio Game
Tickets Toni~hi

Final appointments of assistant
cheer leaders were made after thet
last try-out at the M. A. C. game and
have been announced by Cheer Lead-,
er Cuthbert as follows: First assist-
ant, W. H. Frankhouser, '22L; second
assistant, E. K.4 Pilcher, '23A; third
assistant, G. A. Heath, '23E. The squad
of try-outs has been narrowed down
to six men as follows: R. F. Kile,
'23E, A. F. Hess, '23, D. C. Maeder,
'24, C. F. Pollen,. '24E, G. C. Beeman,
'23, H. B. Hearst, '24. These men
will continue to be on trial at the
rest of the games.
It is planned by Cuthbert to have
each of the three stands in charge of
one of the assistant leaders. This
will permit the cheering in all of the
stands to be under the, direction of an
experienced leader and should result
in more uniform cheering.
Cheer Leader Cuthbert requests that
the assistants and try-outs listed
above meet him in the lobby of the
Union at 5:15 o'clock this afternoon.
Anyone unable to be there at that
time is asked to call him at 1909-R
at noon.

Assignments of tickets for the Oh'
State game Saturday have been mad
the tickets filling out of town ms
orders have been sent out, and th
students' tikets will be in the ma
tonight, according to a statement mad
by officials in charge of the distrib
tion.
Sunday the athletic office was bu
until late at night and all of the alm
nis' tickets were mailed when the o
flice closed at 11 o'clock.
The students' tickets are prepare
for mailing with the exception of
single operation, that of registratik
and when this is done they will
started on their way to those who f
ed their orders. This will be accon
plished before the close of business I
day.
'With mail service at par, the ticke
will be in the hands of the studen
Wednesday morning.

BURTONS AT HOME
SATURDAY
President* Marion L. Burton
and Mrs. Burton will be at home
to returning Micigan alumni aft-
er the Ohio State game next Sat-
urday until 7 o'clock.

nounced that a night session

Edlipso of Moon Visible- Sunday
A partial eclipse of the moon was
visible Sunday night, according to
Prof. W. J. Hussey of the astronomy.
department.

would be
to reach

held if
a final

necessary tomorrow1
vote on ratification.

...._

FOOT BALL NUMBER

Yearly Subscription $1.50

LIP

D1ES

AT BOOKSTORES
ON THE CAMPUS

Single' Issue

- - 25c

ON SALE TODAY

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan