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September 27, 1921 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-09-27

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.2 ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 1921

D 11 T G

SITES

AN OUI

COLLEGE
GEST GAIN
lISTRATION

'TENT OF 4.424
I MANY IORE
'ECTED

TO

IS LIKELY
EERING DEPT.j
School of Education
ally Affect Final

UNIV. HEAD WILL
MEET YEARLINGS
All freshmen will be given an op-1
portunity to meet President Marion L.
Burton at the annual Fall reception
which will be held at 7 o'clock Wed-
nesday in the assembly hall of the
Michigan Union. The entertainment
will be informal and after all the men
have met the'President, speeches will
be made. The first speaker will be
Emerson Swart, '22E, president of the
Union. Following this talk President
Burton will give an address of welcome
to the first year men. Music will be
furnished by the Union orchestra.
It is expected that all freshmen will
avail themselves of this chance to
meet the President personally. The
j idea was first worked out las year and
met with much success. The commit-
tee in charge of arrangements is
headed by James Frey, '22.
MANY ARHTISTS O
MUSIiALPROGRAM
Attractions Scheduled on Choral
Union, Extra Concert Series
Announced
GA BRILOWITSCH, KREISLER,
McCORMACK TO APPEAR HERE

BHTNBC9[CHOICE CREATES
POINTS OUT "CROSS ROADS" AT
WHICH STUDENT MUST
MAKE DECISION
SPEECH MARKS OPENING
OF 85TH COLLEGE YEAR
President Sizes Up Problems Facing
College Man and Preseverance
of Individuality

DR.

WAHR NAMED
AS BURSLEY'S AID

Dr. F. B. Wahr, assistant professor
of German, has been made assistant
to J. A. Bursley, Dean of Students, for
the coming year. Dr. Wahr held the
position. temporarily during the Sum-
mer session, and he is also in charge
of the federal board students who are
under training at the University.
Miss Elsie Swanson, who was see-
retary to Dean Bursley, has resigned
her position to enter the University.
She is succeeded by Miss Rosa D.
Willis. ,
OHIO STATE GAME
Homecoming Date October 22, When
Iraize and Blue Meets
Old Champs
TO OPEN STADIUM FORMALLY
WITH FIRST BIG TEN CONTEST

rollment figures to date, especial-
the College of Literature, Science,
the Arts, show a substantial in-
e over figures at this time last
according to Registrar Arthur G.
Other colleges were not ready
lake definite statements Monday
, so total enrollment information
t available.
Yesterday Busy Day
the literary college 4,424 stu-
have enrolled to date and more
expected today and during the
Last year at this time 4,400
ants had enrolled, including en-
s in the.newly created' School of
ation. This year this department
lding a separate enrollment, thus
rially increasing the total enroll-
for the University.
sterday was perhaps the -busiest
'or those in charge of registration
lassification. In the literary col-
495 men and 181 women enrolled,
ng the day's total in this college
Last year the total for the corres-
ing day was 633 and here again
ation students were included.
Fewer Engineers
cording to bean Mortimer E.
y,. of the engineering college,
tration in this section of the Un-
ity is less than at this time last
.No reason was given for the
rent decrease. .
dents are still pouring into Annj
r and final figures will not bej
able for some days..

Calling the attention of the stu-
dents to the' fact that we are entering
a new year of university training,
marking for some of us the beginning
of our college career, President Mar-
ion L. Burton made use of beautiful
similes and forceful, direct oratory in
winning -the hearts of those present
in sizing up the tremendous mass of
problems confronting students at this
time and then proceeding to grasp the
kernel of the situation with his topic
"Take Your Choice."
4e pointed out the germ, of edu-
cation as an active mind jworking,
making choices, making the best of
all the gigantic mechanism at its als-
posal but at, the same time standing
out as something individual, with
characteristics and ideals upon which
rests the very essence of the thing it-
self.

PROPOSED LOCATIONS FOR
PE STCTESM BY COMMITTEE PLAN

SUBSCRIBE TODAY!
The subscription price for
The MichigFn Daily is $3.50 per
year to local and out-of-town
subscribers. By writing, The
Daily office or signing a sub-
pcription card on the campus you
will be assured immediate de-
livery.
All Michigan Dailies hould be
received regularly, in good con-
dition and on the ,rch. beforeI
seven-thirty in the morning.I
: Subscribers will confer a favor
on The Daily if they will report
'any unsatisfactory deliveiy.
BIG' FOUR BROTHEHO
LEADERS DIECLAE THAT THERE
IS LITTLE DOUBT AS TO
VOTE RESULT

LITERARY CLAS
TO SUPEI'S
j Mi
ARCHITEC I
TO START C

Nay hrf ak
t vi

Final arrangements regarding dates
and soloists for the Choral Union
and Extra concert series have been
made by the University School of Mu-
sic for the 1921-1922 season, and the
soloists chosen show a step forward
in the musical activity of Ann Arbor.
One of Dr. Stanley's last official acts
preceding his retiremnt, as musical
director of the University Musical.
society was to make formal announce-
ment of these courses.
Soloists Appear
.Special interest centers in thei
Third Annual Extra concert series, all
the programs of which wiltx be given
by the Detroit Symphony orchestra,
O0sip Gabrilowitsch conducting, and

a: sisted by soloists of the first rank.
The first of these will be on Nov. 8
i" HOBBS BUSY with Estelle Liebling, soprano, as sol-
IN EASTERN SEAS oist. She is said to have a voice of
unusual beauty and power, especially

William H. Hobbs, headof the
ent of geography, now on
>m the University, is making
ded trip in the Orient, where
iting many islands and carry-
esearch work.
visiting Hawaii, Professor
ailed to Japan, where he spent
time in the study of the for--
>f its mountain ranges. He
ed for the Coral Islands on a
gunboat. Professor Hobbs
irst foreign civilian to be
e opportunity of travelling on
se war vessel.
n as he has visited India, he
bably go directly to the Delft
y in Holland, where he will
his exchange professorship
'as made with Prof. H. A.
and where he will announce
ts of his research.

adapted for orchestral appearances.
On Dec. 12 Raoul Vidas, the re-
nowned French violinist who took
New York_ by storm last season, will
appear as soloist. Mr. Vidas started
on his sensational career at the age
of 7 when he made his debut before
the Queen of Roumania, following
which he was placed under the great-
e'st instructors in Europe and in a
short time gave Aoncerts on the con-
tinent and in Great Britain. He will
appear with practically every great
American orchestra during the com-
ing season.
(Continued on Page Five)
UNIVERSITY LETS GO HOUSES
USED FOR STUDENT ROOMS
Four houses which were taken over
by the University last spring to se-
cure'ground for new University build-
ings have been rented for the year to
landladies taking student roomers in
order to help solve crowded rooming
conditions. The houses accommodate
a total of 56 students.
Two of the houses are located on
East University avenue, one is on
Church street; and the fourth is on
South University avenue. The price
of the rooms ranges from $2.75 - to
$4.50, the average price being approx-
imately $3.

"A choice is inevitable," he stated,
and then proceeded to show how the
choices that the students made were
instrumental in determining tkeir
character, principles and ideals, and
most of all themselves.
On the eve of the new semester,
marking the eighty-fifth year of our
University's history; President Burton
delved to the heart of,,.the temptations
that would present themselves to the
students within the near future and
with perfect frankness that completely
won over the audience called to at-
tention three impoitant and critical
choices which must be faced.
Three Choices
In the first place he spoke of the
choice between good and evil touching
on the tenptations that would be of-
fered including failure to make the
best of opportunities because of purel
laziness, drunkenness, and the temp-
tation 1hich he called the sin of ir-
reverance.
Without assuming the 'air of one
who is reprimanding, the President
reduced to absurdities the arguments
sustaining overindulgence in what he
termed college life, and in clear,
forceful terms pictured the present
day college student as a man who,
though faced by the necessity of
making choices and living in the face
of eternal consternation and conflict,
could nevertheless pick the path of
his choice and still look himself in
the face and say to himself that he
was a real man.
The, second great choice which he
touched on was the choice that is al-
ways confronting us in selecting from
the good things that are around us.
To emphasize the immensity of this
particular problem he cited the fact
that it would 'take 50 years for a stu-
dent to complete all the courses offer-
ed in the College of Literature, Sci"
ence, and the Arts and that the prob-
lem confronting all who pursue that
course beginning today was to pick
the best four years' work.
"Make Weak Points Strong"
This choice was not limited entirely
to the college curriculum but was ap-
plied to the individuality of the stu-
dents and the product which they were
(Continued on Page Ten)

October 22, the date when Michigan
meets Ohio State in the season's first
Conference football struggle on Ferry
field, has been set aside as a home-,
coming day for all alumni of the Uni-
versity, and plans are already under
way to make the occasion one of the
outstanding events of the school year.
With the hearty endprsement of
President Marion L. .Burton, Angus G.
Goetz, '22M, president of the Student
council, and Emerson Swart, '22E,
president of the Union, are making
preliminary arrangements for the
homecoming. The Interfraternity
council will also co-operate.
Want Alumni Back
. Every effort will be made to biring
as many alumni back to Ann Arbor as
possible on that date, and to m'ake
them feel that their connection with
the Jniversity is still as strong as in
their undergraduate days. Fraterni-
ties are to be asked to arrange their
l annual house homecomings for the 0.
S. U. game.
The formal opening of the new sta-
dium is scheduled for Oct. 22, andt
the governors of Michigan and Ohio
have accepted invitations to be pres-
ent with their staffs for the cere-
mony, according to an announcement
made from the Athletic office. How-;
ever, the block "M" is to be used on
the date of the Minnesota game in-
stead of at the 0. S. U. game.
Speeches Arranged f
President Burton will probably ad-
dress the alumni during the home-
coming and other prominent speakers
are to be secured, although no defi-
nite program has yet been formulat-
ed. Many leading newspaper men ofr
the state will be in Ann Arbor at the
time attending the third annual con-t
vention of the University Press club
of Michigan.
While large' numbers of alumni1
have always been enthusiastic visitors
at the football games of other years;,
this is the first formal attempt to set
aside one day during which they will
be the guests of the University andt
the student body.t
Will Enforce Postag'e Rules .
Puttiig notes and letters in laundry
boxes and other packages must cease
immediately or the offenders will have
to face the consequences, . according
to the warning just issued by H. J.
Abbott, Ann Arbor post-master. In
the future authorities will open one
package out of every*10, selected at
random from the mails. When such
notes are found the offender will be
compelled to pay' the first-class post-
age rates.

Chicago, Sept. 26.-Leaders of the
Big Four brotherhood of all afilliat-
ed railroadaunions tonight declared
that they had little doubt of railway
employes voting for a general strike
,rathem: than accepting a rate reduc-
tion, but'have announced that the
conservative council of the leaders
might prevail against a walkout.
General chairmen of the brother-
hood of the railway trainmen began
counting the 186,000 strike ballots of
their men, and it is expected that
next Monday officials of the brother-
hood of locomotive engineers, order of
Srailway conductors, brothethood of lo-
comotive firemen and engine men and
brakemen's unions of North America
will meet to count the strike votes of
their 259,000 members. .
The question as submitted to ' the
men carried a vote for or against "a
strike unless the wage reduction
qudstion can be settled in a manner
satisfactory to the general previous
committee representing the class of
service in which I am engaged."
PROMINENT UNIV.
GRADUATES WED
The marriage of Marguerite Clark,
'21, to Dr. Hazen Miller, '20M, of the
University Health service, took place
Tuesday noon, Sept. 17, at the home of
the bride's parents, Dr. A. B. Clark
and Mrs. Clark oX'Swartz Creek.
After a short trip Dr. Miller anid
Mrs. Miller returned to Ann Arbor,'
where they are occupying one of the
Malcolm apartments.
Mrs. Miller is well'- known among
University students. She was the
Woman's editor of The Daily during
the college year, 1919-1920; president
of the Women's league, 1920-1921,
was elected to membership in Mortar-
board, and is a member of the Alpha
Chi Omega sorority.
Dr. Miller is a member of Phi Beta
Pi fraternity.
MAJOR LEAGUE SCORES
National
Philadelphia 2, Pittsburgh 1.
Cleveland 7, New York 8.

Complete plans for the
building will probably be
publicity within two mon
ing to Professor Sheli
ground may be broken
spriig. The engineerin
committee, composed of
bert C. Sadler, of the nav
ture and marine engineer:
ment, Prof. Alfred H. Wh
department of chemical,
and Prof. John Airey, o
neering mechanics depar
meet this week with rep>
of the architectural firm
Hinchman, and Grylls of :
wil then proceed to diaw u
the structure.
Professor Shepard tra
summer, gathering data for
nection with the building
DAILY EDITORIAL '
WANTED

Definite locatioi
structuires on the
program were an
by Prof. John F. 5]
ology department,
ing plans and a I
eral committee of
Marion L. Burton
charge of the erect
versity buildings.
Some Off "1
,The proposed bi
dated as follows:
ing, east side of e
nue between Colle:
Universityavenue
public Scholl and.
Sarm~en;, No. 2;
cAst s-de of Fast
between Washtena
lege street; physic,
the present Engine
the present Medica
the R. 0. T. C.
stand; Education 'b
of' South Universil
Twelfth street and
avenue, where the
greenhouses now
classroom building
of the present Mus
ly that of Univers
tion to the Denta
to its present site
gram.
The new Engine
be composed larg
laboratories; an a
bly be made to the
ing building to pi
room'space.

TRYOUTS

its for the business side of
chigan Daily may apply
1 2 and 4 o'clock any aft-
this wee'k. Men interest-
dvertising writing can be
t once. First semester
mn are not eligible.

All men and
to try aut for p
Daily editorial
port to the city ed
Tuesday afternoo
of The Daily, sec
building. First
men are not ner

American
Chicago 0, Philadelphia 3.
Cleveland 7, New York

a

ft '

IMPORTANT- NOTICE
Students must exchange athletic coupon fo athletic book before 12 noon

1st, 1921.
Mount Uni

Otherwise they will have to pay admission of Fifty Cents

USHERS WANTED
Ushers wanted for'Ohio State and Minnesota games. The
will pay a fee of $1.00 for each game to University students, prow
to report at Ferry Field at 4:00 P. M. Friday, the day previous to
noon on the day of the game.
Applicants for ushering appointments call immediately at
Room, No. 7, Ann Arbor Press Building, to leave coupon No. 4 ar

game.

Books can be secured at the Athletic Office.

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