100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

June 04, 1922 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-06-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

f

0

WEATHER
AND WVARIMER
TODAY

g SirPi rn

ati

PRESS
DAB AN~D NIGHTWIl
SERVICE

.. .

XII. No. 180

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, JUNE 4, 1922

PRICE FIVE

-L

ICHIGAN

DEFEATS

O

S.

U.,

9-

t
r

LM CEAPTURES
B16 TEN MEE.T
, 3HNNEOTA AND NOTRF
DAME FINISH BEHIND
INDIANS
4DOWSKI GARNERS
FIRST IN POLE VAULT

s Betters Hoffman with
lin; Schmidt Second in
Hammer Throw

Jave-I

(By Associated Press)
Iowa City, Ia., June 3. - Illinois
scored an overwhelming triumph in
the Western Conference outdoor track
and field championship meet today,
piling up 59 6-14 points. Iowa, was
second with 24 1-35, Minnesotathird
with 23 1-10, and Notre Dame was
fourth with 22 13-14 points. Four
Conference records were broken and
one was tied. Illinois won the one
mile relay in record breaking time of
3:20, but was robbed of a victory In
this event lue to' the disqualification
of the team because of Sweet's rough
work. Sweet was alleged to have
knocked down a Notre Dame runner
in making a turn. The race was giv-
en to - Iowa and no time was an-

USHERS APPOINTED
FOR COMMENCEMENT
Ten juniors have been chosen to act
as ushers at the commencement ex-
ercises on June 19 in Hill auditorium.
Due to the limited seating capacity of
the auditoriuni and the large audience
to. be accommodated, these men will
be the only ones outside of the grad-
uates and invited guestssto witness the
comhmencement exercises which will
include the speech of Hon. Charles E:
Hughes, secretary of state.
The men selected for the positions,
which are of an honorary nature, are
Vernon F. Hillery, Robert T. Knode,
Meyer Paper, Sheldon Brown, Irwin
Uteritz, Gilbert T. Ely, Douglas R.
Roby, E. Parish Lovejoy, Thomas I.
Underwood, and Frank E. Camp.
SASALOlWaSKY WINS
RA0CQUETHONORS
Defeats Dixon, Teammate, in Close
Match for Interscholastic:
Championship
OTHER CONTESTS REVEAL
UNUSUAL NET ABILITY
Julius Sagalowsky, national boy
champion, of Shortridge High schpol,
Indianapolis, is the new interschol-
astic title-holder of Michigan.
, He won this honor from his team-'
mate, Guy Dixon, in a close and in-
teresting three-set match on the Fer-1
.ry field courts yesterday morning.
The final ,score was 2-6, 6-4, 9-7. Not
Satisfied with first and second places'
in the singles, the Shortridge boys
proceeded tomake adclean sweep of
_the tournament by defeating O'Con-
nell andMulfinger, of Hyde Park
high, Chicago, in straight sets, 6-3,
6-2, 6-3, in the final round of the
doubles.
sMatch Is Battle
The singles match was a battle of

n finished sev'enth, with 201

One hundred twenty yard high
hurdles-Won by Knollin, Wiscon-
sin; Anderson, Minnesota, second;
Sargent, Michigan, third; Martineau,,
Minnesota, fourth. Time 15 seconds.
No fifth place. Wallace, Illinois, fin-
ished fourth, but was disqualified.
Running high jump-Osborne, Il-
linois, and Murphy, Notre Dame, tied
for first and second, height 6 feet, 5
1-6 inches; Hoffman, Iowa, third, 6
feet; Comm, Iowa, Blatten, Wiscon-1
sin, Campbell. Minnesota, McEllven,
Michigan, and Woods, Butler, tied for

th and fifth, at 5 feet, 10 inches. chop strokes and court generalship.
velin throw .-Angiers, Illinois, Dixon took the first set without Un-

if Vllil {.111 V ti lia:4 ava vy +il ++) F

distance 196
ian, Michigan,
ches; Hanny,,
3-4 inches;
,' 171 feet, 4
Dame, fifth,

feet, 11 inches;
second, 194 feet, 6
Indiana, third, 171
Miller, Purdue,
3-4 inches; Moes,
170 feet, 4 1-4

e vault - Won by Landowski,
gan, 12 feet, 6 inches; Hawker,
esota and Collins, Illinois, tied
econd and third, 12 feet; Devine,
; Chandler, Illinois; McClure,
onsin; Merrick, Wisconsin; Ho-'
Notre Dame; Hall, Chicago, and
t, Northwestern, tied for fourth
fifth, 11 feet, 6 inches.
mmer throw-Won by Hill, Illin-
137 feet, 5 1-2 inches; Schmidt,
igan, second, 129 feet, 4 1-2 inch-
['homas, Ohio, third, 127 feet, 1
White, Ohio, .fourth, 117 feet, 1
Michaels, Chicago, fifth, 115 feet,
inches.
nning broad jump-Won by Os-
e, Illinois, 22 feet, 9 inches; Sundt
onsin, second, 22 feet, 6 1-4 inch-
kchmidt, Michigan, third, 22 feet,
inches-Farlcy, Minnesota, fourth
et, 1 1-2 inches; Johnson, Wis-
n, fifth, 21 feet, 11 3-4 inches.
e mile relay - Won by Iowa
11, Kettler, Deck, and Wilson);
igo, second; Ames, third; Wis-
n, fourth; Michigan, fifth. (No
on account of Illinois fin-
g first in 3:20, but being dis-
fled by alleged roughness by
eet.)
N COMMITTEE REPORTS.
MUST BE TURNED IN SOON
ports of all Union committees
be handed in by the committee
men at the earliest possible mo-
according to Edward F. Moore,
president of the Michigan Union.
committees which are asked to do
re those of house, entertainment,
,oation, announcement, life mem-
Up, reception, publicity, dance,
rd, library, and swimming pool. ,(
o report is to consist of an ac-
t of the work done this year and,
nmendations for the personnel
suggestions for committee action
year. '.
Enslans Must Be Called For
1 'Ensians must be called for be-
Saturday, June 10, according to
rt F. Wieneke, '22, business man-
of this year's annual. On that
they will be put on public sale,
giving the people on the waiting
first chance. All 'Ensians that
not been called for by Saturday

due exertion, but 'young Sagalowsky
came back in the second set and even-
ed up matters. The real battle start-
ed in the deciding set, which found
both boys at the top of their game.
After the set had gone to deuce three
times, Sagalowsky broke through and
won the two games necessary for the
match.
O'Connell and Mulfinger, interschol-
astic doubles champions of Illinois,
found the Shortridge duo a little too
capable and, smart for them. Victory
in straight sets was a true indica-
tion of the superior ability of the
Hoosier pair, who form a smooth
working and effective doubles' com-
bination.
The tournament, as a whole, proved
to be very successful both in the
number of players entered and the
character of the playing. Though Sag-
alowsky and Dixon were. easily the
cream of the list, there were others
who proved themselves above the
average run of interscholastic play-
ers.
Cups to Be Given
Silver loving cups will be awarded
to the winners and runners-up in
both singles and doubles. The vic-
tors are automatically eligible to
compete in the national junior tour-
nament this year. Sagalowsky is ex-
pected to enter the national juniors;
if his playing in the Michigan inter-
scholastic is any criterion, he will
bear watching by both Arnold Jones
and Harold Godschall, favorites for
the junior title this year.
WOLVERINES DEFEAlTED
BY CHICAGO NET MEN
Chicago, June .3.-Chicago net men,
playing stellar tennis, yesterday de-
feated the Wolverine players, in a
hard fought match by the score of 4 to
2. In the singles the men showed up
equally well. both teams winning two
matches. In the doubles, however,
Chicago .showed her superiority by
winning both matches. The results
follow-
Frankenstein, Chicago, defeated
Merkel, Michigan, 6-4, 7-5; Reindel,
Michigan, defeated Stagg, Chicago, 4-6,{
6-2, 7-5; Evans, Chigago, defeated San-
chez, Michigan, 2-6, 7-5, 8-6; Rorich,'
Michigan, dlefeated Defwartee, Chica-
go, 1042, 6-4, 6-4; Evans and Gates,
Chicago, defeated Sanchez and Rorich,
Michigan, 1-6, 6-3, 6-4; Frankenstein
and Stagg, Chicago, defeated Merkel
and Reindel, Michigan, 6-4, 1-6, 6-3.

UTERITZ ELECTED
BAEBALCPTIN
FOR 1923 SEASON
STAR SHORTSTOP RATED AMONG
BEST IN CONFERENCE
CIRCLE
FISHER GIVES OUT 14
VARSITY "M" AWARDS
Seven Receive "A.M.A.'s"; Eight First
String Will be Back For
Spring Training
Irwin C. Uteritz, '23, for two years a
steller infielder on the Varsity base-
ball nine, was elected captain for the
1923 season yesterday afternoon after
Michigan's triumph over Ohio State.
Uteritz is one of thh best infielders
in the Conference and ows a credit-
able mark with the stick. La!st year
Utz played second base on the Var-
sity, but this year with the graduation
of Pete Van Boven, captain and short-
stop of the 1921 team, Uteritz was
moved to short where he has been the
backbone of the Wolverine infield.
Uteritz is one of Michigan's most
rersatile athletes and is a star not
:nly on the diamond but also on the
ridiron where he earned a reputa-
.aon as pilot of the Wolverine eleven
!ast fall. Uteritz was awarded his sec-
and letter of the year yesterday when
he received his "M' for baseball.
! Fourteen "M's" and seven "AM.A.'s'
were the awards givenout yesterday,
by Coach Ray Fisher to the Varsity1
diamond squad. "M's" were awarded
to Captain Vick, Blott, Knode, Wim-
bles, Uteritz, Paper, Klein, Roby,
Kipke, Shackleford, Dixon, Liverance,
Shultz, and Elliott. "A.M.A.'s" were
awarded to Swanson, Benyas, Smith,
Noonan, McWood, Stryker, and Mudd.
Eight of the letter men and five of
the "A.M.A." men wil be back next
spring for the Varsity nine. Captain
Vick, Kipke, Captain-elect Uteritz,
Knode, Paper, and Roby have all re-
ceived more than one "M" this year.
Kipke leads the list with three letters
won in football, basketball and base-
ball. All of the other men have won
two letters in major sports this year.
ROOMING SITUATION
OUMINEDI BY BURSLEY
UNIVERSITY DOES NOT DICTATE
r REGULAR PERIOD OF
RENTAL
Due to the unusual amount of in-
terest ,aroused by the recent petition
from the landladies of Ann- Arbor
placed before the Board of Regents,
requiring students to lease rooms for
the full year, the office of the Dean
of Students calls attention to the po-
sition that it has taken in the past
and which it believes should be con-
tinued in the future.
J. A. Bursley, Dean of Students, has
outlined the policy in the following
points in regard to the matter:
The University expects its students
to keep all of their agreements,
whether verbal or written.
The University does not attempt to
dictate the length of period for which
a landlord shall rent his rooms.
The University believes that the
fairest arrangement for all concern-
ed is for students to engage their
rooms for one semester, leaving the
question of future occupancy open for
mutual agreement between student

and landlord later on, and it advises
students to rent their rooms under
hese conditions. Furthermore, on
account of the uncertainty and mis-
understanding which frequently aris-
es in the case of verbal agreements, it
is felt that some form of written
agreement is most desirable, and for
this purpose the lodging house
agreements supplied by the Dean of
Students and the Dean of Women
have been provided.
It should be clearly understood,
however, that the University officials
do not think it desirable that any
large percentage of the student body
should change its rooms at the end of
the first semester, and they would
strongly disapprove of any uncalled
for moving of students from one lo-
cation to anther at that time.

SUMMER DAILY TO
ISSUE 3 EXTRAS
The Summer Michigan Daily will
issue three Commencement extras on
June 16, 17, and 19. ,The first two
will contain news of class reunions
and various articles concerning gen-
eral commencement events, while the
third will contain the complete
speech of Secretary of State Charles
E. Hughes, who' will be the chief
speaker at the Commencement exer-
cises, as well as an account of Pres-
ident Marion L. Burton's Baccalaure-
ate address. In the June 19 issue
will also appear a series of cuts of
the various speakers at the exercis-
es. All three extras will be distrib-
uted through street sales.
The regular daily publication of
The Summer Michigan Daily will be-
gin Monday, June 26, with the offi-
cial opening of the Summer session.
In it will be published Associated
Press news as well as news of gen-
eral campus interest. The subscrip-
tion price is $1.50.1
'CONTRACTS HINDER
BRelay Caused by Inability to Agree
on Figure for
Work
EXPECT OPERATIONS WILL
BE RESUMED IN FEW DAYS
Operations on the University build-
ing program have again been tem-
porarily - held up, necessitating V'
drawing up of a new figure for the
contract. This has resulted from ani
increase in the cost of labor since
the original bid was received. and
will result in a raise in the price of
the buildings.
Secretary S. W. Smith and John F.
Shepard, supervisor of building plans,
were in Detroit Friday to consult with
Christman ,and company, contractors,
whose bid for both of the construc-
tions was accepted, and arrange-
ments were to have been made to
start work immediately. It was
found, however, that in order to con-
tinue with the work under the new
cost situation the contractors must
first re-figure and strike a new price.
It was hoped that the contracts
could be signed Friday, but this de-
lay will only be for a few days, it is
thought, until a new contract can be
determined. The appropriations call
for $700,000 for the engineering shops
and laboratory and $500,000 for a
model high school. The former will
be constructed on the property lying
between Church street and East Uni-
versity avenue which has been cleared
of houses and the latter, when finish-
ed, will be located just south of South
University avenue between East Uni-
versity avenue and Haven street.
RILWAYFIAYCUT MAY~
BE DECIDED BY COURTS
(By Associated Press)
Cincinnati, o., June 3. - Possibili-
ty of the use of the writ of injunc-
tion in an effort to hold up the wage
reductions decreed by the railroad la-
bor board, will be one of the sub-
jects discussed at the conference to
be held by executives of railroad

UTERITZ, STAR INFIELDER, CHOS-
en to pilot the Michigan 1923 base-
ball nine. :
ORTRCLPROGRAM
SPEAKERS ANNOUNCED
- -
Speakers for next year's Oratorical
association lecture program have been
chosen, and seven of the ten chosen
by the association have been definite-
ly secured and agreed to speak on the
course.
Irvin S. Cobb, humorist, journalist,
and newspaper correspondent, will be
one of the first lecturers if theplans
of the association work out. As an
author he has contributed to the Sat-
urday Evening Post and has written
books for many years.
'Ex-Senator Kenyon, of Iowa, wh*
has recently been appointed by the
'President as a United States districi
judge, will be another speaker.
Frank on List
Glen Frank, editor of the Century
magazine has agreed to lecture. Mr.
Frank, who attended Northwestern
university, was the winner of the
Northern Oratorical league contest in
1912. This league was organized by
Prof. Thomas C. Trueblood of this Un-
iversity in 1890.
Sir Robert Borden, ex-premnier of
Canada, is seriously considering a date
and the Oratorical association feels
certain that he will appear on next
year's program.
Isaac F. Marcosson, American journ-
alist, author and lecturer, has been de-
finitely secured. Mr. Marcosson has
written for the Saturday Evening Post
and has become known especially 'as
an interviewer of celebrities.
Phidelah Rice, a reader, has also ac-
cepted the invitation to speak.
Thomson to Lecture
Sir Basil Thomson, criminologist,
will lecture on "My Experiences at
Scotland Yard." He is the former
head of the British secret service and
of the criminal investigation depart-
ment, Scotland Yard, London.
Strenuous efforts are being made to
include Herbert Hoover in the pro-
gram for next season. Professor
Trueblood will see him personally
Tuesday at Earlham college, Rich-
mond, Ind., where he will be giving
a commencement address and will
bring as much influence as possible to
bear to obtain him as a lecturer.
Invitations have also been extended
to Carrie Chapman, Catt as the wom-
en's representative; the poet, Alfred
Noyes, and Gifford Pinchot. The Or-
atorical association is making a spec-
ial effort to secure Mr. Pinchot.

1 LIVERANCE PROES MASTER OF
MOUND, ALLOWING ONLY
THREE SAFETIES
COTTER DRIVEN FROM
BOX IN SEVENTH FRAME
Roby Connects for Circuit Clout;
Visitors' Poor Fielding
Is Costly
With Liverance pitching excellent
ball, and his teammates on their toes
throughout the game, Michigan's base-
ball team overwhelmed Ohio State
yesterday afternoon 9 to 1. Roby,
playing in left field, made a .spectac-
ular catch of Volk's fly in the first
inning and in Michigan's half of the
third he slammed out a home run.
With this victory over Ohio State,
Michigan finishes second In the Con-
ference standing, Illinois winning the
championship with a 50 point lead
over Michigan.
Liverance started out in fine style
and, aided by Roby's sensational
catch, retired Ohio State with little
effort. In Michigan's half of the
first, Wimbles drew a base on balls
and scored on Vick's single over
third. Shackelford flied out to cen-
ter field, ending the inning.
Hit Hard in Second
Liverance again held the Buck-
eyes helpless in the second frame, but
in this inning Michigan garnered
four runs off Cotter, who was weak
throughout the contest and was re-
lieved by Dudley in the seventh, but
it was too late to repair the damage
done in the second. In this inning
Paper made first on a slow play by
Fesler. Kipke was safe on a mixup
at the initial sack, Paper going tto
third. Roby hit to Cotter, who threw
home to catch Paper, but Marts drop-'
ped the ball and Paper remained on
third. Liverance also hit to Cotter
who fielded poorly and Paper scored,
the bases still loaded. Uteritz flied
out to the shortstop and Wimbles hit
to M tusoff, who muffed the easy
doubl play and Kipke scored. Knode
doubled to right, bringing in Roby
and Liverance. Shackelford struck
out, ending the massacre.
Cotter made the first hit off of Liv-,
erance in Ohio State's half of the
third, but died on base when Livy
tightened up and retired the side.
With nobody on in the last of the
third, Roby crashed out his homer
for the only run of the inning. Neith-
er side could connect in the fourth
but Uteritz made a fine play on Shaw's
grounder to short.
Matusoff Scores on Triple
Ohio State scored her only run of
the game in the - fifth, when Matusoff
hit a three bagger and came home on
an error by Wimbles. In the last of
the fifth Vick placed another single
over the hot corner and scored on
Shackelford's double.
Liverance had the 3Buckeyes at his
mercy for the remainder of the game.
Michigan scored in the sixth on sin-
gles by Wimbles and Knode, the lat-
ter scoring on Windett's error. Dud-

WOLVERINES FINISH, SECOND IN' BIG
TEN RACE BY HUMBLING BUCKEYE
1 OUFTIN ONE-SIDED SLUGFEST

brotherhoods and

organizations

in

Cincinnati next week, it was report-
ed in local railroad labor circles.
Should it be the opinion of legal ad-
visors of the brotherhoods that there
are grounds for asking such a pro-
ceeding of the courts it would be an
alternative to a strike vote, it was
said.
Railroad men said that if the Penn-
sylvania railroad could hold up even
the announcement of the decision of
the board by an appeal to the courts,
as happened in the case involving the
legality of a ballot for the election of
a workers' committee to confer on
rules and working conditions, then it
was declared the same would hold in
any activity of the board.
REPAIRS NECESSITATE
SHIFT OF EXAM LOCATION

ley relieved Cotter in the
and the Wolverines were un
work him for hits.
Summary and box score:
Ohio State ,AB R H
Fesler, ss .........4 0 0
Windett, rf........4 0 0
Volk, 3b. .......400
Shaw, cf.........4 0 0
Bauman, if.........3 0 0
Lyden, lb.........3 0.0
Matusoff, 2b. ....3 1 1
Marts, c...........3 0 0
Cotter, p.........2 0 1
Dudley,p........ 1 0 1
Totals.........31 1 3

seven
able

PO AE
1 1 0
2 0 1
0 3 0
2 0 0
2 0 0
9 0 0
1 1 2
6 1 0
0 3 1
1 0 0
24 9 4

1lichigan AB
Uteritz, ss........5
Wimbles, 2b.....3.
Knode, lb.......... 4
Vick, c............ 4_
Shackelford, rf .... 4
Paper, 3b..........3
Kipke, cf,.........4
Roby, if ...........3
Liverance, p.......4

R
0
2
1'
1:
0(
1
1
2
1

H
0
1
2
2
1
1
1
2
0

Po
0
13
6
2
1.
1
2
0

AE
3 0
3 1
0 0
1 0
0 0
3 0
0 0

I HONOR GUARD TO REHEARS

SE

Due to the fact that some repairs;
are to be made in the auditorium of
the physiological chemistry building,
the exam scheduled to be held there
Wednesday from 2 to 5 o'clock will be
given- elsewhere. A notice as to the
time and place will be posted on the
forestry bulletin board in the Natural
Science building.

Final rehearsal for the com-
mencement honor guard will be
held at 4 o'clock 'Thursday, June
15, in Waterman gymnasium. The
color bearers for the exercise
will be R. Jerome Dune anid
Frank W. Steketee.

"
1
°
)

Totals ........34 9 10 27 1
Home run---Roby; three base hi
Matusoff; two base hits---K
Shackelford; struck out-by
ance 6, by Cotter 6; bases
off Cotter 2, off Liveran
off Cotter 10, off Livera
pitcher-Roby; umpir
Schuler.

--

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan