100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

June 02, 1922 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-06-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

.., . ,. .,.a.,.....

01'Re"

Treasurers of the freshman and
sophomore girls' social committees are
asked to take their accounts to the reg-
istrar's office to be audited, after which
they should be brought to Dean Jor-
dan's office. All other girls' organiza-
tions are also requested to bring their
treasurer's books to be kept over sum-
mer vacation.
All houses or persons having funds
for the Michigan league campaign
must send them to the treasurer of
the campaign committee, D' rothy Jef-
frey, 836 Tappan road at once. This
money is needed for campaign ex-
penses and will be collected individ-
ually unless paid in this week.
Persons having employment for
girls attending summer school or the
fall term and those who will take girls
to work for their room next fall are
asked to register at Dean Jordan's of-
fice as soon as possible.
Freshmel and- sophomores who
have for any reason missed their
posture examination should take it
from 9 to 12 or from 2 to 4 o'clock
today. No appointment is necessary.
All lockers must be emptied by noon.
on Friday, June 9, without fail. Stu-
dents who have had lockers with keys
should bring both their tickets and
keys to Miss Wood. The ticket re-
quires her signature before a refund
can be made for the key at the treas-
urer's office.
Mary A. Griswold. '21, will be the
acting director of Alumnae house- dur-
ig the. summer school term.
Girls who are members of the Oirls'
Educational club and desire to be in-
iWated into Phi Lambda Theta are re-
quested to leave fees of $8.50 with Miss
Cameron at the appointment burea

today and tomorrow. The national
ai lchapter zonstitutions are also at
fmiss Cameron's office and should be
copied by each member in preparation
for the coming cxamination.
Chaperones i 1dances this week
end will be: Union-Friday, Miss
Martha Hills; Saturday, Mrs, H. W.
Cake; Armory-Friday, Mrs. 11. G.
Berger; Saturday, Mrs. Ella Heartt.
WOMEN'S LEAGUE
WILL SELL SOAP
Plans are being made to introduce
'Olive Bloom," the new league soap,
during commencement Aoek. This is
a pure vegetable oil soap and comes'
wivapped in tin foil. It will sell for
10 cents a bar or three bars for 25
cents. This soap has be, u made es-
pecally fo- the league safe and is in
every way a satisfactory soap as test-
ed out. One of its salient qualitie is
that it will lather in any watr
The soap may be orderui tr'ru Catll-
erine Mullen, '23, at Martha Cook
building, who will have cha'rge of the
sale next year and all orders sent in
immediately will be delivered before
the end of the school year. During
commencementweekthe soap will be
on sale at Martha Cook building, Hel-
en Newberry residence, and Betsy
Barbour dormitory. It will probably
be sold during Summer'session and
the committee in charge expects to
launch a big campaign eualy next
fall.
HONOR GUARD INSTRUCTED
ON COMMENCEMENT DUTIES
Seniors who were appointed to act
as honor guards in this year's com-
mencement parade were instructed in
their processional duties yesterday
afternoon by Dr. George A. May, di-
rector of the Waterman gymnasium,
in the gymnasium.
By means of an elaborate plan of
the procession which marked the posi
tion of each detail, the seniors were
enabled to obtain a clear idea of their
function in the parade. After securing.
pennants from Dr. May in the secre-
tary's office, University hall, they will
meet in front of University hall at 8:15
o'clock commencement morning,
whence they will escort the faculty,
guests, and Regents to Hill auditor-
lum.
The guard will be composed of the
main body of seniors, the lits on the
left and the other detachments on the
right, all carrying pennants of yellow
and blue cloth, with the class colors at
the top of the staves.
Dr. May states that it will be neces-
isary for each member of the guard to
attend the second rehearsal at 4
o'clock. June 15. in Waterman gym-
nasium.
Judiciary Council Members Eleefed
Members of the judiciary council of
the Womens' league were elected as
follows yesterday: Senior represent-
ative, Beatrice Hoek; junior repre-
sentative, Pamela Brown; sophomore
representative. Geraldine Truscott.

ANN ARBOR GIRLS
TO OPEN NURSERY
A nursery for the children of facul-
ty members, visiting alumni, and oth-
er guests will be conducted by the
Ann Arbor University Girls' club dur-
ing commencement week the proceeds
to go to the Michigan league campaign
fund. The committee in charge in-
tends to keep a girl stationed in Al-
umni Memorial hall to take charge of
all children and see that they are tak-
en to Betsy Barbour house. The chil-
dren will be given competent care and
every effort will be made to keep them
amused while their parents attend the
commencement activities.

NEED DIRECTORY TRYOUTS
Those who wish to try out for
the business staff of the Stu-
dents' Directory call Robert E.
Dyment, '23E, at 558 after 5:30
o'clock. in the afternoon.
Follow Michigan with The Summer
Michigan Daily.--Adv.

. . -

FIRSTI
1BA
Organim
3%Qp
~Savings
= Oldest NationalI

NATIONAL,
INK
ed in 1863
paid on
Deposits
Bank in Michigan

ADRIAN-ANN ARBOR BhS LI
Schedule in effect June 1, 1922..
Central Standard Time.
(Slow Time.)
Leave Ann Arbor for Adrian at 8
a. m., 12:45 p.' m., 4:40 p. m. daily
cept Sundays and holidays.
Sundays and holidays, 12:45 p. m. a
6:45 p. m.

{r.aaaaaaaaaa0EaaOW-If"a0Na.S anopuEEaEagaaxuErEnEasatESEU

WOMAN AND ESCORT
ATTACKED IN DARK
Culminating a recent series of hold-
ups in and about Ann Arbor came the
attack on Philip Karker, '23, Sunday
night on the boulevard.
Kerker was walking in the boule-
yard near Sleepy Holow at about half
past 10 Sunday night, in company with
a young woman, when a Negro sprang
from the bushes near the road and
seized the girl. Kerker struck him
and told the girl to run. The Negro
quickly recovered from the blow,
knocked Kerker down with a club, and
disappeared. Kerker was taken to the
University hospital by people who
had been attracted by the noise of
the struggle.

SHOE-SHINING PARLOR TO
BE CONTINUED NEXT

YE A It

I
I
I
I
i
I
I
I
3
a
i
r
1
I
a
f'
i
I

7
aaaaan
IIr a ._.._
s
i
's
i
;
i
'
r
{F {i
I=
I;
I's
:
e
a
') t
i
y#;
le
.:
'
I;
:
a
!;
(",
is
i
i
I;
,auisa

1.5'..W

'TWO

byD.. )II. P.for

i

The Ann Arbor Savings Bank

W

HEN the sun rose this morning it
brought with it the most modern day
you ever lived in. For ages this day
tly waited its turn to reign. Yester-

Look well to this day.
brimming with opportunity.

For someone it is
Watch carefully,

ha

aspatien

I-

AT THE THEATERS

so -*at* sta t 4 as AS .."A.. . s.tr.r rtt..s..t AA.#s.ts ..r... r"..r..ra..tt . a f.aA of I.AAS.f r. R.rtrr.r ... sr ssr .tf n. too*tt#. A#AA t#tfNrftsu #AA#R#t tfi# iits..t.....*nos fss##i#t#" " " "A.t##.

MINUTE TALKS

TODAY

I

Sophomores at Newberry residence
have voted to continue next year the
shoe-shining shop which they started
this year for the benefit of the Mich-
igan league campaign fund. The shop
has been closed but thetcommittee
asks that anyone who has tickets save
them until next year when they will
still be good. Persons who have been
selling these tickets outside of the
dormitory are asked to return the
money andthe remaining ticketsat
once so that everything may be set-
tIed for this year.
Gamma Phi Beta Invaded by Burglar
Much excitement and a loss of a
small sum of money was effected when
a burglar entered the Gamma Phi
Beta house Wednesday morning about
1 o'clock. The burglar made his en-
trance through a window, did not
touch any silver or jewelry but took
only money. The theft was reported
to the police.
NOTICE
Any "What's Going On" notic-
es for examination week should
be handed in to The Daily before 1
I Saturday, June .el
46 issues - The Summer Michigan
Daily-46 issues.-Adv.

day had to come and go before today could
possibly exist. Yesterday and the day before
and so on for countless days and weeks and
years. Centuries have passed; men have lived
and worked and conquered and finally died;
empires have risen, held their sway and passed
on; monarchs and despots have ruled and gone
their way; republics have risen and held their
own - and through it all civilization has ad-
vanced until a few short hours ago the sun
broke over the horizon and brought with it
this, the modern day. Tempered by the hard-
ships of centuries, mellowed by all the wisdom
of the ages, invigorated by the youthfulness
of its first and only existence this day comes
to you for you to do with as you will.

SCREEN

for as sure as the sun rose this morning you
have opportunity in store for you. This day
may bring it to your door. Be ready, for only
a few short hours and this day, with all that
it brings and means, will pass on into the great
field of yesterdays. Once by, your opppor-
tunity is forever lost. No power in your com-
mand can turn the hands of time back one
single second or stop them in their progress for
as long a time.
When your opportunity arrives it will make
certain demands of you. Be ready to meet
them. If it requires brains, have them. If it
demands capital or goods, be ready to supply
the need. Prepare for the call for you may
expect to hear it. But above all, watch-look
well to this day.

...:..

if

Arcade-"Across the Continent,"
with Wallace Reid, Mary Mac-
Laren, and Theodore Roberts.
Majestic - Dorothy Dalton in
"The Crimson Challenge."

I

N

I

Orpheuin-"The Child Thou Gay-
est Me."

Wuerth - Raymond Hatton in
"His Back Against the Wall."

The evolutin of a dinloma

1

----------
- - -

----- .---.-

1

I -

'Tis Time to Talk
of Bathing Suits
and Things
Along That Line
Entirely new things that every woman will
want to see; embracing all that is new in
lake and ocean bathing attire. The styles
are not only the latest and exclusive but the
goods are quality goods and the best to be
had anywhere.
Batinq uits of pure wool jersey in black, all
colors ar d conibliations. One-piece Suits with
skirt. Many striking novelties are shown. High
qpuality garments.

. .
IU
,., ' N
f/ // .
\/ i
/
4 /
/a
/

VN

'K

There's hard work ahead

. . iii. L r vavti.a.av, v . ri .aaNivasscs

before you can play this horn
Ordinarily a diploma doesn't turn into a horn of
plenty overnight. This truism suns up a good deal
of the advice you seniors may expect to hear.
People who know best don't want you to be im-
patient. They say you can't expect to run things
from the start. Are they right?
To answer that question, look back to the time
when you were freshmen. How many in your class
won any worthwhile-campus honors that year?
And why should they? What kind of a varsity
team would freshmen make?
Well, that's the way many people feel about
seniors hoping to run the business world next year.
The ambition to lead is all right. But-in business
as at college-first must come the try-outs. Then,
if you plug hard; the scrub team. Then, when you
show you've "got the stuff," the varsity.
But through it all remember this: the harder you
work on the scrub, the sooner you'll make the
varsity and the better you'll cover your position.
Work hard. Keep fit. Don't get downhearted.
Remember, the team will need new blood some
day-maybe next game. When your chance comes,
be ready.

Bl
Sil

Women's Bathing Suits, sizes 34 to 54, $3.95, $5.00,
$7.50 to $17.50.
Misses' Bathing Suits, sizes 14 and 16, $3.50, $5.00 up.
Children's Wool Jersey Bathing Suits, sizes 1 to 12,
95c, $1.50 up.
ack Jersey Swimming Tights, $1.25, $1.50, $1.95, $3.50.
lk Bathing Suits, Women's and Misses,' $5.75 to $20.00.
Beach Costumes, Taffeta and Novelty Weaves,
$7.50, $12.75 up.
Eponge and Rubberized Satin Capes, $7.50, $10, $20.
Bathing Caps, all sizes, 50c to $2.95.
Bathing Sandals, all colors, 95c, $1.50, $1.95.
Bathing Shoes, assorted colors, $1.75, $1.95, $2.50.
Bathing Hose, fancy stripes and colors, $1.95.
Bathing Bags, 95c, $1.50; $1.95 to $3.95.

,-
1 j
" l ( iLi
a : Y+

/1~

the interest of Elec.
trical Development by
an Institution that will
be helped by what-
ever helps the
Industry

Since 186

EkdtrieCompany
19 makers and distributors of electrical rjuipment

"Zydrc zsha WOOWo" A ovD I& STATE
ONP4LA i~C OPBbINE6&
No CONNECTION WITH ANY OTHER STORE

I\\-

Number 19 of a series

/

I.:

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - --- -

IY r I I11Y1/ i I I AY Y

Back to Top

© 2022 Regents of the University of Michigan