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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

June 02, 1922 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-06-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

.. ..

OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY
OF MICHIGAN
Published every morning exdept Monday during the University
year by the Board in Control of Student Publications-
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusivly entitled to the ' s
resublidation of all news diatches credited to it or sotethorwies
credited 1i this paper and the Ica&t we pablished tkroUL
Rawerd st the poto*e at A~a Arb r, Meklana a se8d
Cla aattr
Subscription by arrier or sail, i. e.
Oc~ess: Ari Arbor Prase Building, Maynard Street.
Phses: Business, 96a; Editerial, .44.
Communications not to exceed ;so words, if signed, the signa-
!ure not necessarily to appear in print but as an evidence of faith,
and notices of events will be published i The Daily at tlhe discre-
tion of the Editor, if left at or mailed to The Daily office. Unsigned
communications will receive no consideration. N manuscript will
be returned unless the writer inclosesdpostage.
The Daily does not necessarily endorse the sentiments expressed
in the communications.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
MANAGING EDITOR...........BREWSTER P. CAMPBELL
News Editor.... - ---.......................Joseph A. Bernsin
City Editor...............................James B. Young
Ass't City Editor................. . ...Marion Kerr
Night Editors -
R. E. Adams G. P. Overton
Jokn P. DawsnlM. B. Stahl
Edward Lambrecht Paul Watzel
Frank McPike
Editorial Board Chairman.................L. Armstrong Kern
Editorial Board-
Leo Hershdorfer E. R. Meiss
C. T. Andrews
Sunday Magazine Editor.............Thornton W. Sargent, Jr.
Exchange Editor..........................George E. Sloan
Muic Editor.................... ....."."Sidney B. Coates
Sporting Edito .............................George Reindel
Conference Editor......... ...............Harry B. Grundy
Women's Editor..........................Elizabeth Vickery
Humor Editor............... ....--. ..- - .."'.. R. Meiss
Assistants
Maurice Berman H. A. Donakue Marion Koch
lack D. Briscoe Dorothy G. Geltz J. E. Mack'
W. B. Butler H. B. Grundy Kathrine Montgomery
R. N. Byer Winona A. Hibbard R. C. Moriarty
A. D. Clark Harry D. Hoey Lillian Scher
Hary C. Clark Marion Kerr R. B. Tarr
Evelyn J. Coughlin Victor Klein Virginia Tryon
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
BUSINESS MANAGER................VERNON F. HILLERY
Advertising....... .... . .......- ..........Albert J. Parker
Advertising.......................John 3. Hamel, Jr.
Publication......"................. ..... Nathan W. Robertson
Accounts............... .... ...-....Walter K. Scherer
Circulation.................................Herold C. *Hunt

equal size, and with practically the same sources
from which to derive material. . As competition
grows keener championships will continue to be
harder to get, and the campus should take satisfac-
tion in realizing that a showing such as Michigan
.has made in the present year means just as much
as the championshipse of bygone days when Michi-
gan surpassed the other state universities so far in
size.
PERMANENT POETRY IN AMERICA
Ann Arbor's poet series of lectures was fittingly
rounded out last week by the appearance of Vachel
Lindsay, sometime vagabond singer, and individual-
ist artist par excellence. The sympathetic apprecia-
tion and hearty applause accorded this unique poet
by his University audience is indicative of the grow-
ing universality of thought and sentiment with re-
spect to what is valuable as education and as art.
Wherever there is native human nature and im-
pulse, originality of expression, courageous devo-
tion to convictions, and an evident desire to better
mankind, consistently with more or less definite
ideals of beauty and merit, enlightened mankind
will extend an open welcome and generous recog-
nition, however extraordinary the particularities of
the artist may seem at the moment to be.
In doing this mankind is not only extending due
encouragement to genuineness, but is greatly bene-
fitting itself by the enlargement and enrichment of
its own knowledge and nature. The modern poet,
like the wandering minstrel of earlier centuries, is
thus enabled to contribute nthch of color and sweet-
ness to human life, which otherwise might either
become too drab or remain too strenuous for the
best public health.
For these reasons it is to be hoped that another
literary series will be provided in Ann Abor next
winter, and may become an established part of
Michigan's collegiate round of events. By their
remarkable interest in this year's lectures the stu-
dents and people of Ann Arbor have given their
generous 'measure of stimulus to the poetry move-
ment in America - a movement in advancing
which the present generation no doubt will be
found also to have served well themselves, and
their children and their children's children.
SHOWERS: HOT AND COLD
A bit of iismanagement that is causing no end
of inconvenience to the users of Waterman gym-
nasium is the continued neglect of the shower room.
.On hot afternoons such as we are now having,
students are prone to seek the comfort of the gym-
nasium showers only to find about a half dozen or
so in working order. This condition, while it has
not always been so noticeable as it is lately, has been
bothersome throughout the year. Many times have
students been forced to take a cold shower after
their workout because someone has failed to see
that the hot water is turned on.
?t is acknowledged that Waterman gymnasium is
entirely too small for students to use it comfortably,
and certain inconveniences are taken without re-
sentment. But the. conditions in the shower room
could be easily remedied. Some one isn't on the
job.
The second annual booklet of the class of ':3 has
been mailed free to all members of that class to-
day. Such a publication, containing an outline of
the activities of the class during the past y ear, is not
only valuable for its records, but also for the unity
which it fosters. Other classes might do well to
follow the example *of the junior lits in this re-
gard.
Ilie Telescope

!.

Gifts for Graduation
Graham s
BOTH STORES

DETROIT UNITED LINES
TIME TABLE
Ann Arbor and Jackson
(Eastern Standard Time)
Detroit Lifmited and Express Cars-6:oo
a. M., 7:0o a. m., 8:0o a. m., 9:0o a. m. and
hourly to 9:05 p. in.
Jackson Express Cars (local stops of Ann
Arbor)-9 :47 a. m. and every two hours to
Local Cars, East Bound-s:s a. m., 7:o
a. m. and every two hoursto 9:oo p. nm.;
c:oo p. m. To Ypsilanti only-t t :40 P. im.,
12:2s a. in., t1 a. M.
To Saline, change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars, West Bound-7:50 a. M,, 2:4O
To Jackson and Kalamazoo-Limited cars:
8:47, 10:47, a. m.; 12:47, 2:47 4:47 p. m.
To Jackson and Lansing-Limited: 8:47
P. M.

Is Your Pen Ready for Exams?
ERIDER
THE EN SPECIALIST 308 S. STATE

CARS FOR HIRE
REO five-passenger touring cars, by
hour or day. You drive the car and buy
the gas and oil.
RATES--$2.oo first hour, $1.59 second;
$ 15 per day, 12 hours.
Call for reseryations. Phone 16.
E. G. HILDNER.

U

Travel

1922
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MAY
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Of Course-.
Lverybody Does"
Ever lo s e anything by
Fire, Theft or Wreck ?

BRING YOUR.PANAMA AND STRAW
HATS IN NOW TO BE CLEANED.
Prices for cleaning Panamas $1.25 up.
Prices for cleaning stiff
straws.. .........75 up,.
We do only high class work.
FACTORY HAT STORE
617 PACKARD STREET
Telenhone 1792
FRIDAY-SATURDAY
A First National
Attraction
"The Child
Thou
Gayest Me"

Certain ly-
Who hasn't?"

Then why not insure your personal effects while travel-
ing? The cost is almost nothing; the comfort great-; the
protection certain.

L. Beaumont Parks
Edw. Murane
James Prentiss
A.Dryer
. H. Wolfe
Stanley Monroe
William Graulich
Harvey Reed
GeorgeRockwood
E. D. Armantrout
Edward Conlin

Assistants
Lawrence Favrot
C. '"D. Malloch
Wallace Flower
Charles R. Richards
Richard G. Burchell
H. W. Cooper
W. K. Kidder
D. L. Pierce
C. L. Hagerman
S. L. Bauer
C. L. Putnam
A. S. Morton
James Bernard

K. C. Seick
Berbert Good
H. L. Hale
Arthur Hartwell
A. M. White
Glen Jepsen
Howard Hayden
J. Blumenthal
Eugene Dunne
John C. Haskins
W. D.CRoesser
J. S. Conmpton

CALL
JOHN J. MORIARITY
1027 FERDON ROAD,
PHONE 2123-J

FRIDAY, JUNE 2, 1922
Night Editor-JULIAN E. 1RACK
Assistant-J. P. Dawson
A NEW SITUATION
Ann Arbor has long considered herself ex-
tremely fortunate in the total absence of lawless-
ness in the way of hold-ups or attacks, and as a re-
sult residents here have been in the habit of ven-
turing into the most lonely places without a thought
of fear for their safety.
rfhis spring, however, a number of assaults by
yet unapprehended ruffians have occurred especially
in the vicinity of the boulevardtand one at least
has resulted in severe injuries to the victim. To
have such law-breaking persist would indeed be de-
plorable, and would continue to render unsafe for
residents one of Ann Arbor's most delightful spots.
Cannot the city employ a more rigorous system
of policing the boulevard district in order to stop
the lawless occurrences of the past few weeks?
AN ATHLETIC SUMMARY
Another athletic year is nearing completion and
while supreme honors have not been won in any
,conference sport, every team that has represented
Michigan has made a showing creditable enough to
maintain the high standard set by its predecessors
and to presage a successful season next year. View-
ing the season as a whole the results have been
entirely satisfactory, overbalancing whatever ten-
tative disappointment may have arisen from time
to time at the loss of a championship.
The football team, hampered from the start be-
cause- of excessive injuries of a serious nature, in
the end successfully overcame all difficulties and
even outplayed the best of its rivals. After losing
the first game to Ohio due in part to the psychologi-
cal effect of a touchdown made early in the game
by a freak play, the team held Wisconsin to an
even score and easily won the remainder of its con-
tests.
In basketball, which is still a comparatively new
sport at the University, the team again after start-
ing badly, won the majority of games and finished
among the leaders, making a good bid for the cham-
pionship. Many new players were developed dur-
ing the course of the season who will be valuable
to Michigan in years to come.
As to baseball, track, and tennis, the records of
these teams are too fresh in the minds of most stu-
dents to need much repetition here. The rack
championship is yet to be decided, but Michigan's
team while strong in dual competition, may lack the
individual high point winners to gain first honors-
n a conference meet. The tennis team minus three
of last, year's men -completed a most successful
eastern trip and won the majority of its dual con-
tests; The narrow margin by which Michigan lost
the baseball championship is known on the campus.
Thinking only in terms of first honors the pres-
ent athletic season has not been successful, but
Michigan should not expect championships every
year. There are other schools in the conference of

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76 William Street, New York

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Would You Like to See Something Different? Here It 1s!

R

fii l

ti

I

I

THE HERO WAS A COWARD!
He was striped with yellow like a zebra. The sight of a
six-gun turned his blood to water, and his life. was one
long nightmare of fear!
Fate yanked him out of an East-Side Tailor Shop and
spilled him into the wildest cattle town in the West.
The town bully promised to fill him full of holes then
things began to happen!

I

N,

The Old Faithful
There are books on science
And books about art,
There are books of fiction
Which tug at the heart.

4

There are some that help us
When in them we look,
But the one we need most
Is Dad's pocketbook.
The Third One
Today we are printing a thrilling and blood-cur-
dling story which has been submitted for our con-
sideration. We hope the judges are hot subject
to fainting spells because we want this one to stand
a fair chance. As ail extra precaution, have the
smelling salts within easy access.
THE DEADLY RING
A man lay flat on his back, motionless. He was
sleeping. It was in the deadly silence of the night,
and the whole house seemed to be submerged in
more than ordinary quiet. This silence seemed to
stifle one, and to engulf one's very soul with hor-
ror.
Suddenly the vast stillness was broken by a
strange sound, seemingly a forerunner to disaster.
A sharp click, a grating whir, and then a conglome-
ration of noise that no mortal would like to de-
scribe. The noise grew louder and more incessant,
and the man jumped hurriedly from his bed and
looked for the source of the disturbance. He drop-
ped to the floor, and grasping the trembling thing
in his hand, he threw the alarm clock out the win-
dow.
One to Think Over'
What does a student dream about during a lec-
ture? UNCLE BEANIE.

S-

-.... a ...
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asw
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------

x

PRESENTING

Raymond

Hatton

His Back Agamst the
A TWO-GUN COMEDY WITH EVERY
CARTRIDGE LOADED WITH LAUGHTER!

Wall"

NEWS

WUERTH ORCHESTRA

(

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