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May 30, 1922 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-05-30

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THE WEATHER
PROBABLY UNSETTLED
AND COOLER

L

Ar Ap
dd@L -AL
flitr ttu

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WII
SERVICE

VOL XXXII. No. 176.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, MAY 30, 1922

- PRICE FIVE

DAILY

BUYS

NEW

$10,000

PRES

WOLVERINE'S CHAMPIONSHIP HOPES
SHATTERED WHEN BASEBALL SQUAD
DROPS SAME TO WISCONSIN,4T01 ',.'

WILL HAVE MACHINE SURPASSING
EQUIPMENT OF ANY OTHER COLLEGE1
INCREASES SIZE TO SEVEN COLUMI

PADDOCK AND ELLIOTT LARGELY
RESPONSIBLE FOR CARDINAL
VICTORY
ILLINOIS NOW HOLDS
BIG TEN LEADERSHIP
Dixon, Liverance, and Elliott Each
Take Mound as Michigan
Hurlers
Michigan's chans for the 1922
Conference baseball championship
went glimmering yesterday afternoon
when the Varsity lost to Wisconsin
onPFerry field by a4-1 score.
*PaddoAtk, the Badger hurler and
* towdy" Elliott, short stop, were
most responsible for the Cardinal vic-
tory. Paddock pitched a fine game,
holding the Wolverines to three hits,
striking out nine men and issuing
only two free tickets. Elliott pro-
duced two of his team's runs by two
long hits, one going for a home run
and the other a three bagger.
Opens Favorably
With Milt Dixon in the box for the
Wolverines, Wisconsin went one, two,
three, in the opening inning. Mich-
igan,however, got a man as far as
third base only to leave him stranded
there. Uteritz lead off for the Varsity
and was safe when Elliott booted his
grounder and then threw low to first.
Wimbles sacrificed, putting Uteritz on
second, Knode advanced him to third
when he grounded to second, but Vick
ended the inning by going out pitcher
to first.
Elliott, first man up for the Badgers
in the second, hit one on the nose and
drove the ball to right center for a
home run. It was one of the longest
drives ever seen on Ferry field and
rolled almost to the tennis courts.
Dixon.then retired the Cardinal with-
out further scoring.
With one out in the third Dixon
walked Roll Williams. Ruidger bunt-
ed but the ball hit him and he was de-
clared out. Caesar then followed with
another homer along the left field foul
line, scoring Williams ahead of him.
Coach Fisher then 'sent in Liverance
to relieve Dixon. Literance passed El-
liott and forced J. Williams to pop
to Paper ending the inning.
Liverance was also in wonderful
form and with the beginning of the
third inning the game developed into
a pitchers' battle with no more scor-
ing until the seventh frame when the
Wolverines counted their lone tally of
the game.
Hitless Till fifth
The Varsity went hitless until the
fifth when with two- gone Kipke
singled but was out stealing. Up until
then the Cardinal moundsman was in
perfect form striking out three Wol-
verines straight in the third and two
out of the three men who faced him
in the fourth. Michigan went out one,
two, three again in the sixth but in
the seventh frame made a belated
rally. Wimbles opend the inning with
a sharp single through second. knode
hit into what was almost a double
playtut was able to beat the throw to
first after the Badgers had caught
Wimbles at the keystone bag, Vick
went out short to first, advancing
Knode to third who had reached sec-
ond by a passed ball. bhackleford
drew a walk from Paddock and Paper
singled, scoring Knode. Kipke ended
the inning by flying out to left field.
Wisconsin scored again in the eighth
When they got their only hit of the
dar~ing the time Liverance was
on the mound. R. Williams secured
another walk and was brought home
by Elliott with his second long drive,
a triple to deep left. Liverance then
forced . Williams to pope to Wimbles
for the third out. While in the box
iverance was In exceptionally good
fprm, yielding only one hit in six in-
nings and striking out seven men.
(Cntinued on Page Five)
E ar~NIR. P RtGRAMSI

DAILY TO SUSPEND ISSUE
OF MAY 31
Due to the observance of Memor-
ial day, The Daily will not be
published tomorrow, Wednes-
day, May 31. The offices will be
closed today.
June Garg Issue
Ready Tomorrow

HIGH SPEED PRESS BOUGHT YESTERDAY FOR THE DAILY BY PUB-
LICATIONS BOARD- THE FINEST COLLEGE PUBLICATION OWN-
ED PRESS IN THE COUNTRY.

There have been many farewell
numbers of the Gargoyle and some of
them have been fair and some of them
not so well, but the issue that is com-
ing out tomorrow is going to be the
fairest of the fair.1
The preface is said; It pulls strong-
ly at the heart strings of its readers;j
or at least that is its purpose. For it
tells of how "Preffy" came to the Garg
office years ago and worked and now
how he mst pass on into the ethereal
wilderness of the beyond. (Slow sad6
music by the orchestra.)
When the jolly young used-to-be-
frosh gazes upon the fraternity ini-
tiation of 900 A. D. as James House,n
'23, sees it, he will thank his luckyI
(Continued on Page Eight)
CANDAOPPOSES
ST1 LAWENCE DEAL
Government Officials Aware of Adverse
- Feeling ow the Part of f
Canada
OFFICIAL STATEMENT MAYf
CONTAIN NEW REASONING1
(By Associated Press)t
Washington, May 29.-Although al-a
most without precedent in the historyI
of America's international affairs, thev
declination of the Canadian govern-c
ment to embark on negotiations rela-e
tive to the construction of the St. Law-t
rence deep waterway did not take of-e
ficials here by surprise. For somet
time, it is understood, officials have
been aware of a feeling of opposition
in certain regions of the Dominion.
The reply of the Canadian govern-a
ment had not reached Washington to-t
day, and in advance of its receipt, inz
view of the possibility that the com-
munication might contain some line oft
reasoning not apparent in the brief
statement made in the Canadian par-f
liament today, officials refused to dis-
cuss the next step to be taken.
WOMEN CHANGE CLSSS
AT LANTERN NIGHT FTE
FIELD EVENTS ARE FOLLOWED
BY AWARDING OF ATHLETIC ;
HONORS
All is in readiness for the Lantern
night festivities which on Wednesday
night will- mark the passing on of
classes for the women of the Univer-
sity. The ceremony is an annual
event which is combined with Field
day .to celebrate the completion of the
year's events in women's ativities.
The leaders for the various classes
in the final Lantern procession have
been chosen, all of them girls who
have served in some capacity for their
classes. Helen Bishop, president of
the Women's Athletic association, and
Edna Groff, president of the Women's
League, will lead the march of the
seniors, and Doris Sprague and Eslie
Townsend will be at the foot of the
senior line. Frances Ames and Grace
Fry, presidents-elect of the Women's
League, and the Women's Athletic
association, respectively, will lead the
juniors, and Margaret Whyte and
Marion Koch will be the foot coupe.
The sophomore leaders will be Marion
Willis and Katherine Stafford, at the
head, and Lois Miller and Dorothy
Bishop at the foot. For the fresh-
men, Alma Crouse and Marianna
Smalley will lead, and Catherine Styer
and Ruth Halliday will be at the foot.
(Continued on Page Seven)

CITY PLANS FITTING MEMORIAL DAY
SERVICES IN HONOR ,OF SOLDIERS

Military Organizations Will March in!
Parade This Morning; Speches
on Program
GOVERNOR'S PROCLAMATION
REQUESTS AID OF PEOPLE
All University classes will be dis-
missed today in order to permit a
proper observance of Memorial day.
In his proclamation designating May
30 as Memorial day, Gov. Alex. J.
Groesbeck requests that flags be dis-
played at half-staff until noon and
then hoisted to the top of the staff.
In addition to this ceremony, the
governor requests that everyone co-1
operate in plans for the observance of
the day as a tribute to American sol-
diers living and dead.
Proclamation
The complete proclamation is as
follows:
More than three score years have
passed since our fathers took up arms
in defense of the Union. That was the
primary purpose of the Civil War, to
preserve the Union; but as the war
progressed it became more and more
apparent that slavery must be killed.
It had fastened itself upon us; it grew
with our growth; it strengthened with
our strength; but when at last it lift-
ed its mailed fist to strike a blow at
the Nation's life, then the nation arm,
ed itself to save itself, and for liber-
ty as well; and when four years of
agony were over, a new witness to hu-
man brotherhood went forth from
these shores and the light sped all
around the globe. Some of those who
took part in this great conflict are
among us yet, though a fast diminish-
ing company.
For many years it has been the cus-
tom of our people to go out on Memo-
rial day and place flowers on the
graves of those veterans of the Civil
War who have passed on, and with
appropriate public exercises to show
honor and respect to those who are
still with us. May the Republic never
cease to commemorate the heroic
achievements of the men who freely
offered their lives that the Nation
might live.
Care for Old Soldiers
In the Spanish-American War and
in the recent World War the sons and
grandsons of those who fought at
Shiloh and Gettysburg fully maintain-
ed the honor of America.
Therefore, in order that we may
pay a tribute of respect and affection
to the surviving veterans of all these
wars, and do honor to the memory of
.their fallen comrades, I sincerely urge
that Tuesday, May 30, 1922, be fitting-
ly observed as Memorial day, and I
earnestly appeal to the people of
Michigan for hearty co-operation in
plans for the proper observation of
the day in their respective communi-
ties. The comfort and convenience of
the old soldiers, will, I am sure, be
the first care of those in charge of the
arrangements.
On Memorial day flags should be
displayed at half-staff until noon and
then hoisted to the top of the staff.
Given under my hand and the Great
Seal of the State this seventeenth day
of May, in the year of our Lord one
thousand nine hundred, and twenty-
two, and of the commonwealth the
eighty-sixth.
Three Jnits in March
Practically all of the military or-
ganizations of Ann Arbor have com-
pleted their plans for the Memorial
day services, in honor of the memor
of their fallen heroes. There will be
three units in the march - one uni
composed of ex-service men, anothe

of national guardsmen, and the third
being the R. 0. T. C. unit, which is
planing on marching ini the parade
with almost all of its total attendance
of 450. The men will meet at 9
o'clock this morning in front of Hill
auditorium. M7ajor Robert Arthur will
lead the line of march from Hill audi-
torium to the court house square,
where an appropriate memorial serv-
ice will be held consisting of music.
and speeches.
The line of march from the court
house will proceed to Ferry field,
where the University divisions will
hold a similar service commemorat-
ing the memory of their own men who
died in service.
Army and navy veterans in uniform,
Varsity band, and G. A. R. will form
in Thayer. street by the side of Hill
auditorium; National Guard, and Boy
Scouts on Ingalls st.reet on the oppo-
site side of the auditorium; and the
R. 0. T. C. band and unit in the drive-
way between Natural Science and
Chemistry buildings. All veterans not
in uniform will form at . this place
also.

Finance Commitee in Favor of
Soldiers' Bill, Is Forecast
of Members

the

SENIOR RECEPTION COM- I
)HTTEES
Senior reception and ball com-
mittees of the various colleges of
the campus will meet at 3 tomor-
row afternoon in the Michigan-
ensian office.
Downpour Stop
'Tennis Tourney
(Special to The Daily)
Minneapolis, May 29. - Rain inter-
fered with the tennis match between
the Michigan team and Minnesota this
afternoon. Only the four single match-
es had been completed, and the score
stood at two all. The first doubles
match had been started and marked
and .Reindel of Michigan had taken the
first set 9-7.
The second set was 3-0 in favor of
Norton and Pidgeon of Minnesota
when the heavy downpour put a stop
to further playing. The second dou-
bles match had not been started.
Michigan made her points through
wins'by Reindel and Rorich over
Pidgeon and Kuhlman- of Minnesota,
respectively.
Norton of Minnesota won from Mer-
kle and Bros of the Gopher team beat
(Continued on Page Eight)
EXPEC'T SENA-TORS'
tBONUS APPROVAL

FIVE REPUBLICANS BACKI
PAID UP LIFE INSURANCE1

ENGINEERS ACT FOR
WATERDEVLPMN
COUNCIL WILL CO-OPERATE WITH
U. S. TO BETTER NATURAL
RESOURCES
Action looking toward co-operation
with the United States government in
the development of national water
power resources and in reforestation,
at the meeting of the American Engi-
neering council last Friday and Sat-.
urday in Pittsburg, Pa., was reported
yesterday by Dean Mortimer E. Cooley
of the engineering college, president
of the council, who returned to the
city Sunday. The American Engineer-
ing council is the executive body of
the Federated American Engineering
societies.
The council's committee on water
power, Col. E. H. Finney of Washing-
ton, chairman, was authorized to con-
fer with the members of the cabinet,
and if necessary with the President of
the United States, in the effort to se-
cure constructive action by the federal
water power commission. The action
was deemed advisable dut to reported
ineffectiveness of action on the part
of the federal commission.
"The federation will not inaugurate
and reforestation campaign," said
Dean Cooley, in speaking of the coun-
cil's action in this connection. "Our
purpose i rather to help in the move-
ment already organized by forestry
bodies; to form a secondary line; to
get behind and push. We have no in-
tention to encroach upon the field of
the foresters but we intend rather to
co-operate." The council's reforesta-
tion work is in charge of a committee
headed by Charles H. MacDowell of
Chicago.
(Continued on Page Eight)

(By Associated Press)
Washington, May 29.-Approval of
the senate finance committee on Wed-
nesday of a soldiers' bonus bill fol-
lowing closely the house measure with
its bank loan provisions, was forecast
today by members of that committee,
both Republicans and Democrats, aft-
er discussing the subject nearly two
hours.
An informal canvass of the commit-
tee indicated that the members were
divided nine to six for the house meas-
ure, with some modifications --- the
so-called McCumber plan. Five memo
bers, all Republicans, were reported
to favor the Smoot proposition of paid
up life insurance in lieu of all other
forms of compensation.. One commit-
teeman, Senator Williams, Demerat,
Mississippi, was understood to be op-
posed to any bonus legislation.
Whether a land reclamation provision
is to be instituted in the McCumber
plan is an open question, and conse-
quently it may be some time before
the bonus bill is reported to the sen-
ate.'
lulIle tin

PLANS TO PUBLISH 208 INC
MORE, MAKING SHEET ON.
THIRD LARGER
TO REDUCE PRINTING
TIME OVER 9 HOU
Speed of 6,000 Papers Per Hour '
Print Entire Issue in 50
Minutes
Enlarge ment of The Daily t
standard seven column paper n
year will result from the purc
yesterday of a new Duplex press c
ing approximately $10,000 by
Board in Control of Student Publ
tions from the Duplex Printing P
company of Battle Creek. The p
ent inadequate six column size of
Daily and other mechanical ha
caps on the paper will be comple
eliminated by the installation of
new press this summer.
The new equipment will give to
Daily the finest publication-o.
college press in the country, and
purchase marks the biggest step
has been taken in the expansio
the paper in its history.
More Associated Press news of w
is happening throughout the cou
and other telegraphic features of
outside of Ann Arbor, will be feati
in the paper. Heretofore, the la
amount of local mews has held 1
graphic news to a space altogether
small. A picture service will be
ed. The greater space will also
mit the handling of a greater am!
of local news.
More Advertising Spase
Advertisers who have often been
able to secure space in The Daily
cause of the limited, facilities, are
certain of securing any servie
may desire.
Still further expansion of The I
has been looked into, as te press
have a capacity of eight column
the page, if a further enlargemei
necessary.
With a speed of 5500 to 6000 pa
printed and folded, per hour, the
press will make possibel the pri
of The Daily in approximately
minutes. All eight pages will
printed at once. At the present
two pages are printed at a time,
the printing period is approximi
10 hours.
The added space due to the e
column on each page, and the e
sion of the column length to 20 i
es, will give The Daily 208 u
inches every day, which will mak
paper between a third ad a fo
larger thanethe present eight
sheet.
Extra and special editions wil
handled with a speed that The ]
has never been able to attain be
of inadequate press facilities. ]
ball extras will be on sale next
before the band leaves Ferry fel
More Live News
The regular editions of The
will be enabled to go to press
much later hour, and the news
be correspondingly more live. It
be possible to handle news "br
late at night. The workers o
paper each night will not start
until 6 o'clock in the evening n
the new plan. Now, they start I
ing copy to the machies early in
afternoon. With the space res<
for the big stories which come in
in the evening, only the liest
will be handled,
The press will be in stalled i
- (Continued on Page Eight)
THEL DAILY~

Chicago, May 29. - Michigan golf
team lost to Chicago by 19 to 2. Loeb,
Stlketee, and Slaughter lost three
points to Hratman, Ford, and Mc-
Quire. Smith won two from McQuire.
Foresomes with Loeb and Slaughter
lost four, Smith and -Steketee six.
Ford had 78, Hartman 79, Loeb 80, and
Smith 81.
SENIOR LITS TO HOLD MOCK
ELECTIONS IN FINAL MEETING

x

I

Remaining programs and -an- I
nouncements for seniors will be I
distributed from 1 to 4 o'clock I
Wednesday afternoon in TJniver- I
sity hall. This is the last call 1
which will be made. '
J. M. STEDMAN, I
Chairman, Invitation Committee. I
1

Senior Lits will meet the last time
this year at 4 o'clock tomorrow in
room 205 Mason hall. Various com-
mittees will give their final reports,
and an alumni secretary will be elect-
ed. The mock elections to determine
the "most popular man," "the prettiest
I girl," "the biggest grind," and many
such titles will be held.
Legion Minstrels Please
Replete with jokes, dialogues, and
specialty acts of many kinds, the
American Legion minstrels invaded
Hill auditorium last evening, and
I were enthusiastically received. Al-
though decidedly amateurish in many
spots the entire production from
start to finish was a success.

NEED DIRECTORY TRYOUTS
Those who wish to try out for
the business staff of the Stu-
dents' Directory call Robert E.
Dyment, '23E, at 558 after 5:30
o'clock in the afternoon.

The following men have bee
pointed to the editorial staff o
Daily: Maxwell E. Fead, '25
Garlinghouse, '25; Joseph H. E
'25, Paige Lenman, '25, Robert E
'25, Jacob W. Renvitch, '25; Fr
Dickman, '25E.

_I

I
I

UNION CHAIRMEN
It is necessary that annu,
ports of all Union comm
be in the hands of the prey
not later than Thursday, Ji
FRANK H. L
Recordi Secretary, Mic
Union.

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