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October 16, 1921 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-10-16

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THE WEATHER.
CLOUDY AND WARM
TODAY

<L

SirsiAVr

El xtl

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIBl
SERVICE

VOL. XXXII. No. 19.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16, 1921

PRICE FIVE (

FIGHTING WLVERINES TAKE HARD
OUGHT CONTEST FRO M M A C
AGHGRGATION BY SCORE O.F 30, -0

'ovie Hen At Union Create Stir;
Students Anxious To Get-In Film

RIN ORDERED OUT ON NATIO-NAL
STRIKE OCT. 30, FOLLOWINO TVOTE
ON REDUCTI-ON Of WAGE SCA

CONTEST WITH FARMERS OFFERS
MICHIGAN REAL TEST
FOR 0. S. T.

AGGIES STRONG
HALF; WEAK IN

FIRST
SECOND

Kipke and Goebel Star, Helping
Overcome Absence of Steketee
and Dunne

to

Michigan football followers had the
first opportunity to see the Wolver-
ines in action against a team of near-
ly equal defensive ability yesterday
afternoon when the Wolverine eleven
took M. A. C.'s measure on Ferry field
by defeating the Aggies 30 to 0 in the
first hard game of the 1921 schedule.
Eighteen thousand or more specta-
tors watchedtthe rejuvenated Farmer
eleven fight to the last ditch, during
the first half of the battle, in a vain
attempt to check the Michigan "of-
fense.
Wolverines Start Slowly
The Wolverines were slow in getting
under way, playing a safe game de-
fensively, but exhibiting none of the
dash on the offense which has char-
acterized their play in the previous
games. The Maize and Blue counted
but four downs in the opening half,
although the ball was at all times in
its territory. Only once during this
half did the Aggies make a first down
and then they were aided by a pen-
alty.
Lack of offensive power and drive
was largely due to the absence of
Frank Steketee who is being saved
for the Ohio State contest, Banks and
Usher, both of whom were injured
shortly after play had opened and
forced to leave the game. Except for
Kipke's brilliant work in line plung-
ing and skirting the ends the half was
devoid of thrills.
Dunne and Wilson Missed
Michigan's line showed clearly the
need of Captain Dunne who was not
started in the game, and Hugh Wilson,
who was forced to retire in favor of
Johns because of an injury.
When the second half opened the
Wolverines came out with but six reg-
ulars in the line-up, and Bernie Kirk
was soon replaced by Curran leaving
five first team men in the fray. They
started on attack which the Farmers
were at a loss to solve and took little
time in scoring the second touchdown.
Klpke Breaks Through
In the last quarter Johnson punted
to Kipke on Michigan>-45 yard line.
From here the fleet footed halfback
dodged through a broken field of
struggling Farmer tacklers, and raced
across the line. Kipke's.55 yard run
was one of the prettiest of the year.
Knode, who replaced Kipke after
heomade his third touchdown, scored
the final three points with a drq from
the 33 yard line.
On the line Goebel, Vick and Muir-
head were- always conspicous> in
breaking up plays directed through
them, while the playing of Goebel in
particular was conspicuous through-
out the game. Searle and Knode also
showed to advantage. :.
FIRST QUARTER
Capt. Dunne won the toss and chose
that Michigan defend the west goal.
Johnson kicked off to Banks who re-
turned the ball to-the Michigan 30
yard line, after running 20 yards.
Kipke gained 5 yards around left end.
Banks added 3 more around the oth-
er end. Michigan was penalized 5
yards for being off-side. Uteritz punt-
ed 40 yards and Archibald was thrown
in his tracks on the M. A. C. 33 yard
line. Banks was injured on this play.
Uteritz replaced him at quarter and
Searle took Uteritz's place at half.
Wilcox gained 3 yards through right
tackle. Archibald failed to gain on

the following play. Graves squirmed
through the line for 1 yard. It was
fourth down and Johnson kicked to
Uteritz, who returned the ball 7 yards
-to the Michigan 37 yard line.
Kipke was thrown by Bos for a 2
yard loss. Kipke punted out of bounds
on the M. A. C. 20 yard line. Graves
made 1 yard through the line. Wilcox
was thrown for a 2 yard loss by Wil-
son on the next play. Johnson then
punted from his 10 yard line and the
ball rolled to Michigan's 20 yard
marker. Kipke punted to Wilcox, who
was thrown on his own 40 yard line.
Archibald made 4 yards through center
and Brady skirted right end for 13
more. However, M. A. C. was penal-
ized 15 yards for holding and the ball
was brought back to their 30 yard line.
On the following play Goebel stop-
ped Wilcox behind his line. Michi-
gan was penalized 15 yards for unnec-
essary roughness and the ball was
carried to the M. A. C. 47 yard line.
Wilsox was injured on the play and
Noblett took his place at left half.
Archibald fumbled but an M. A. C.
man recovered. Muirhead threw Arch-
bald for a small loss, and Graves was
held for no gain on the following play.
Johnson punted to Kpke, who was
downed on his 23 yard line.
Kipke made 3 yards through right
tackle. Uteritz fumbled and Michi-
gan lost 10 yards. Wilson was injured
and Johns took his place at guard.
Kipke punted to Noblett, who was
thrown on the 50 yard line. Brady
gained 3 yards through the line. Johns
held Brady for no gain. Noblett made
2 yards through left tackle. This was
fourth down and Johnson punted to
Kipke, who was thrown on his 22
yard line. Searle failed to gain. Kipke
punted to Noblett, who was nabbed
by Cappon on the M. A. C. 23 yard line.
Archibald made a yard through center
on a fake punt. Usher was hurt in
the play and Dean substituted for him
at full. Noblett fumbled and Cappon
reovered on the M. A. C. 17 yard line.
Kipke circled left end for 9 yards
and Dean made it first down with a
gain of 5 more. Dean went over left
tackle for a touchdown. Goebel kick-
ed goal. Score: Michigan 7, M. A.
Vick kicked off to Noblett, who car-
ried the ball back 15 yards to M. A.
C.'s 20 yard line. On. the two plays
following Graves and Archibald fail-
ed to gain. Johnson punted to Uter-
itz, who was thrown on the M. A. C.
47 yard line. Weckler substituted for
Noblett at half for the Aggies, Searle
hit tackle for 3 yards and Dean added
I more. Archibald intercepted Uter-
itz's forward pass on the M. A. C.. 27
yard line, as the quarter ended. Score:
MichIgan 7, M. A. C. 0.'
SECOND QUARTER
The ball was put in play on the M.
A. C. 27 yard line. Archibald was
thrown for no gain, and Graves lost a
yard on the next play. Johnson kicked
out of bounds on Michigan's 25 yard
line. Uteritz made 6 yards through
right tackle and Searle made it first
down with an additional gain of 4
yards around right end. Kipke hit
left tackle for 5 yards. Graves then
threw Dean for a loss of a yard.
Kipke punted to Weckler and Cappon
threw him on the Aggie 15 yard lin.
Archibald was stopped on a line-buck.
Brady squeezed through left tackle
for a yard. On the next play Johnson
punted to Uteritz who brought the ball
back 5 yards to the Aggie 48 yard line.
Kipke skirted left end for 20 yards
giving Michigan her first down on the
M. A. C. 28 yard line. Dean made a
yard, but Michigan was penalized 15
yards for holding. Weckler intercept-
ed Uteritz's pass on his on 25 yard
line. Wecker failed to gain. Graves

hit guard for 5 yards. On the next
(Continued on Page Six)

Timidly the wild-eyed fresman
glanced over his shoulder as he
scurried toward the Union entrance.
Wistfully the passing co-ed sighed as
she Pealized that she was not permit-
ted to pass through the sacred portals
of the front entrance.
Why this, sudden action, why these
unwonted sighs? Simply because rep-
resentatives of the University of Wis-
consin were taking moving pictures
of the Union building yesterday noon.
Is this not a sufficient reason why
the freshman should wish his noble
physiognomy to go down to posterity
as one who was an essential "ixture"
to the institution. Is it not ample

reason that the co-ed should wish her
fair face viewed by the jealous rivals
of our neighboring university.
And thus "amid this mass of human
emotions" fwas the Union! building
filmed yesterday afternoon. Several
external views were taken, one from
the tower of neighboring fraternity
house. On the inside, the assembly
hall, the barber shop, the tap room,
the dining rooms, the billiard room,
and the lobby were all filmed in order
to make the showing complete.
These pictures will be used by the
University of Wisconsin in the ad-
vertising campaign to raise the final
half million dollars needed for -its
new Union building.

FACULTY CONCERT BIG FACTOR IN
OPENING Of MICHIGAN MUSIC, WEEK

Local, State Churches Co-Operate in
Offering Special
Programs
S. OF M. MUSICIANS APPEAR AT
AUDITORIUM THIS AFTERNOON
Michigan's First Music week opens
today in Ann Arbor churches and in
churches throughout the state with
special music by the choirs, special
sermons and hymn singing for the
congregations. The first regular con-
cert of the week will be the Faculty
concert at-4:15 this afternoon in Hill
auditorium.
Concert Program Good
An interesting program has been
prepared for the opening concert in
this series by several of the leading
musicians of the School of Music fac-
ulty. Those who will play are Nora
Crane Hunt, contralto; Samuel P.
Lockwood, violinist; Albert Lockwood,
pianist; violin obligato by Marian
Struble, and piano accompaniments by
Mrs. Maud Okkelberg and Clara Lun-
dell.
On Monday the first event will be
the musical luncheon by the Kiwanis
club at the Chamber of Commerce,
when there will be community sing-
ing and other musical features.
Special Numbers Prepared
In the evening the first concert
will be given at 8 o'clock in the high
school auditorium. Special numbers
on the program will be the singing of
the First Congregational church
BULLETIN
In order to correct any wrong
impressions, Trainer Archie
Hahn declared late last night
that Ted Banks and Ed Usher
had sustained only minor in-
Juries to the knees, and that
neither was in a serious ceondl
tion after being taken out of
yesterday's game with M. A. C.

choir, under the direction of Earl V.-
Moore; the high school orchestra of
23 pieces, George Oscar Bowen, con-
ductor; Miss Lucile Graham, student
pianist; a group of sixth and seventh
grade children from Bach school,
Miss Lou Allen, supervisor, and com-
munity singing by all present.
4 '~
CHIMES PREPARED FOR
SEASON'S DEBUT. TUESDAY
CAMPUS MAGAZINE WILL DEVOTE
MOST OF ISSUE TO
FOOTBALL
Chimes, All-campus opinion month-
ly, will appear on the campus next
Tuesday. Stories and photographs
of Michigan football elevens, past and
present, will constitute a large part
of the October issue.
Edwin Denby, '96L, is the author
of 'The Game's the Thinf", the chief
feature article of the issue, in which
the writer sketches his football days
at Michigan. Mr. Denby, now secre-
tary of the navy, was a prominent
athlete white a student at Ann Arbor.
His picture as he appeared in foot-
ball uniform will accompany the ar-
ticle.
Class of 1925, Why Are You
Here?" by R. Jerome Dunne, '22, cap-
tain of this year's football squad, ap-
pears accompanied by a drawing of
"Duke" as frontispiece.
Interviews with 12 men from Yost's
All-time Michigan teams are compil-
ed by Robert E. Adams, '23, under the
title, "Where Are They Now?" James
Hume, '23, presents the prospects for
the 1921 football season, as seen the
first day of schbiol.
Dean Hugh Cabot, of the Medical
school, has contributed "Health an
Asset or a Liability?" "Seventy-One
Years a Michigan Man", is an interview
with Dr. George W. Carter, '53M, old-
est living alumnus, by Wade P. Con-
nell, '21.

NOTICEt
One hundred more rooms are
urgently needed to accommo-
date alumni and visitors next
Thursday, Friday, and Satur-
day, at the time of the meeting
of the Press club of Michigan
and the O. S. U. football game.
Housekeepers with rooms avail-
able kindly communicate with
the Union.
PHILIP SCHNEIDER, '24,
Chairman O. S. o.
Rooming Committee.
SOCIAL WORKERS,
CONFERENCE ENDS
Dr. G. W. Kirchwey Delivers Address
Concerning Modern Treatment
of Crime
LYNDE DISCUSSES WORK OF
WISCONSIN'S ORGANIZATION
Questions of criminal treatment and
organization of social service units
concluded the four day State Confer-
ence of Social Work at noon yester-
day.
Dr. George W. Kirchwey, former
warden of Sing Sing prison, in dis-
cussing the present day reaction to-
ward leniency to criminals said, "It
is utter folly to think of repressing
crime merely by punishing it. What
we need all over the country is a
more thorough system of probation,
and a greater reliance on juvenile de-
linquency and domestic relations
courts.
"All of our courts," he declared,
"should be sup-plied with more ade-
quate probation equipment. Crimin-
ology should also be taught as 'a
requisite in all 'of our law schools.
Our criminals should be treated far
more individually."
Edward D. Lynde, secretary of the
Wisconsin State Conference of Social
Work, discussed Wisconsin's system
of social service organization. He ex-
plained details of the method by
which Wisconsin has been united in
social work through county as well
as state organization for the past two
years. It has been because of this
organization, Mr. Lynde stated, that
several important social service bills
have been passed in the state legisla-
ture.
PHYSICAL EXAMS
PLANNED FOR ALL
"Every man in the University will
have a physical examination before
the end of the school year," said pr.
Warren Forsythe, director of the Un-
iversity Health service. We have fin-
ished with the freshman classes and
will slowly get around to all of the
other classes."
Work has started with the Law
school. The other schools will fol-
low, the lits being the last to receive
examinations.
WYVERN CHOOSES
ELEVEN JUNIORS
Wyvern, honorary society for jun-
ior women, has elected to memebrship
the following girls: Miriam Schlat-
terbeck, Frances Ames, Margaret
Reineke, Deborah Jones, Helen Part-
low, Sadye Harwick, Anne Hinshaw,
Barbara Baker, Esther Welty, Gladys
McConnal, and Kathryn Kuhlman.

MORE THAN. HALF MILLION KEN
WILL OBEY ORDERS FOR
WALKOUT OCT. B8
SAID UNION TOTAL MAY
APPROXIMATE 2,004,00
Big Five Brotherhood Issues Warning
Against Violence on Part
of Strikers
Chicago, Oct. 15. - More than hal
a million of American railroad men
were today ordered to initiate a strike
Oct. 30, while other unions which will
raise the total to about two million
announced unofficially that they were
tonight preparing to follow suit and
make the walkout general on the same
date.
Under this program the tieup would
be complete, accordingto Union pre-
dictions, by Nov. 2.
The hour was fixed for 6 o'clock
Oct. 30, except for one Texas line,
whose trainmen were authorized to
walk out Oct. 22.
Roads Covr 42 States
The railroads listed in the first
group in which the strike is to be-
come effective touch 42 of the 48
states with a trackage of 73,000
miles, out of the total United State
trackage of approximately 200,000.
The New England states comprise
the group that is virtually untouched
in the first walkout.
The strike orders were issued to
the Big Five brotherhood, oldest and
most powerful of the railway uniofls,
and they specifically included mail
trains in the walkout. Their provi-
sions instructed striers to keep away
from railroad property with a warn-
ing that "violence of any nature will
not be tolerated by the organiza-
tion".
Strike Follows Vote
The strike was announced following
an overwhelhing vote said to be up-
ward of 90 per cent, favoring a strike
because of a 12 per cent wage reduc-
tion authorized by the United States
Railroad Labor board on July 1, and
after it was declared by the associa-
tion of railway executives in session
here yesterday that a further reduc-
tion would be sought by the rail-
roads. It was said that the strike
decision was made before the an-
nouncement of this further intended
cut.
*
WANT TRYOUTS FOR
OPERA ORCHESTRA
Tryouts for the Union opera or-
chestra have been called by Kemp
Keena, director of the opera orches-
tra, to *meet at 7 o'clock tomorrow,
evening in room 308 of the Union.
Places to be filled are piano, first
violin, second violin, cello, bass viol,
traps, cornet, clarinet and flute. The
orchestra will be a special opera or-
chestra and will travel with the
company when "Make It For Two
goes on the road during the Christ-
mas vacation. Tryouts are requested
to meet promptly.
Yesterday 's Scores
Wisconsin 47, Northwestern 0.
Ohio 27, Minnesota 0.
Iowa 14, Illinois 2.
Notre Dame 33, Purdue 0.
Yale 23, Williams 0,
Navy 13, Princeton 0.
Syracuse 28, Brown 0.
Penn State 28, Lehigh 0.
Cornell 110, Western Reserve 0.

Penn 7, Swathmore 6.

THE LINE-UP

MICHIGAN

M. A. C.

Kirk ....................L.E..............Gingrich
Cappon .................L.T.................:Thorpe
Van Orden ..............L.G................ Matson
Vick ..................C......... ...... Morrison
Wilson ...............R.G..............Swanson
Muirhead ...............R.T...................... Bos
Goebel ..................R.E.................. Johnson
Banks................Q.B................ Archibald
Kipke ...................L.H.................. Wilco
Uteritz .................R.H................... Brad
Usher ..................F.B................... Graves'
Summary-Touchdowns, Kipke 2, Dean 1, Goebel 1.
Drop-kicks, Knode 1.
Goals after touchdown, Goebel 3.
Substitutions for Michigan-Uteritz for Banks, Searle for Uteritz,
Johns for Wilson, Petro for Van Orden, Curran for Kirk, Smith for Petro,
Fairbairn for Smith, Smith for Vick. For M. A. C.-Park for Thorpe,
Weckler for Brady, Hughes for Johnson.
Referee, H B Hackett, Army; umpire, C. Dorticos, Chicago; head
linesman, Harry J. Costello, Georgetown. I

SEASON TICKETS
(including $3.00 May Festival
coupon)
$4.50 - $540 - $5.50

Six Excellent Concerts by the World's Greatest Artists:
(1) Harold Bauer, Pianist (Oct. 20); (2) John McCormack, Tenor (Nov. 22); (3) Ignaz Friedman; Pianist (Dec.
5); (4) Fritz Kreisler, Violin (Jan. 9); (5) Erika Morini, Violin (Feb. 3); (6) Rosa Raisa, Soprano, and Giacomo
Rimini, Tenor (Mar. 14).
Tickets for the course or for single concerts on sale at the University School of Music.

Tickets for Single Concerts, $1(
--$1.50-$2.00, except for M
Cormack concert, for which t
price is $2.00 - $2.50- $3.0

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