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May 25, 1922 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-05-25

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WERS

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V.
i

AlitA6

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DAY AND NILGHTJ
SERVICE

/

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, MAY 25, 1922

PRICE

MMMWAW

IL MEN
MEETI:NG

JOURNALISTS, ACCEPT
CATION OF SIGMA
DELTA CHI
[ANGE IDEAS ON
klTION PROBLEMS
ects Scheduled for Three
ogram of Discussions
and' Speeches

R.

legates to the first
of high school ed-
advisors of high
s are due to arrive

the beginning

of the

ention, sponsored by Sigma
national professional jour-
ternity, is the first of its
held in this state. It will
ther representatives of 20
A publications who will
ir problems in common and
deas for better publica-

The program will include speeches
men prominent in journalistic
ds and round table discussion
oups at which men active in Uni-
sity publications will lead discus-
n of the problems which confront
high school editors.~
Register at 9 Today
Registration of delegates will take
ce today beginning at 9 o'clock.
flowing the registration an address
welcome will be given by Herbert
Case, '23, president of Sigma Delta
[,, the organization responsible for
y convention. Case will"tell of the
rposes of the conference and out-
e its work.
[he first speech of the meeting will
given by Donal Hamilton Haines,
the department of rhetoric and jour-
lism, who is known as a novelist
i short-story writer. He will be
lowed by T. Hawley Tapping, '16L,
tional secretary of Sigma Delta
I, who is connected with the Booth
idicate in this state. Mr. Tapping
Li 'speak to the delegates on sum-
r employment of newspapers.
kt 4 o'clock C. S. Boothby, vice-
sident of Jahn and Ollier Engrav-
company of Chicago, will give an
istrated lecture in Memorial hall.
will talk on "Illustrating a High
hool Paper," and will tell many of
a ways in which publications can
benefited by the use, of illustra-'
ns to the best advantage.
Fraternities Opened
'he delegates will be furnished en-
tainment at the fraternity houses
the campus. Twenty women dele-
es who have arranged to attend
11 be housed at the dormitories
e. Entertainment tonight will be
nished through the courtesy of the
Oestic theater, to which the dele-
es will be admitted free of charge.
NTY FORGER TAKEN,
BY BANK OFICIAS
)flicials of the Ann Arbor Savings
ik took action towards eliminating
ty forgery here when Morton Kline,
=.25, was arrested on complaint of
rman A. Ottmar, who is temporarily
charge of the University avenue
imch. Kline was taken into custody
M. H. McDougall, a detective in the
ploy of the bank.
Cline, after being arrested Monday
,ning, made a signed statement con-
sing that he had forged three
ecks, two for $5 each and the other
$3. Action on the case has been
thheld pending the arrival of the
y's father from his home in Plain-
d, N. J.
'here has been an unusually large
ount of forgery in Ann Arbor lately,
cording to Mr. Ottmar, teller of the
n Abor Savings bank. For the pur-
se of investigating such cases and
prehending the offenders, the bank
s retained a detective who will serve
til the end of the school year.

Seniors Sing On
Campus Tonight
Seniors will meet tonight in cap and
gown on the Library steps for their
fir-st sing previous to graduation. The
order of events will be the same as
was scheduled for last Thursday's sing
which was postponed on account of
weather inclemency.
The sing will start promptly at ?
o'cicok and end at 8. Seniors are ask-
ed to acquaint themselves with the
songs on the program. All seniors
are requested to be present in caps
and gowns and all others are invited,
whether they are seniors or not.
DRAMATIC CRITIC
LECTURES TODAY
Director of "North Carolna Play-
makers" Has Attracted Wide
Attention Nationally
TO TALK ON "CONTEMPORARY
DRAMA" THIS AFTERNOON
"Prof. Frederick H. Koch is far
more important to the future of the
American stage than is elaso or
Arthur Hopkins." The above is quot-
ed from the Septembr, 1921, issue of
Shadowland and com es from the pen
of Walter Pritchard Eaton, well known
dramatic critic.
University folk will hear Professor
Koch at 4:15 o'clock this afternoon in
Natural Science auditorium, when he
will talk on "Contemporary Drama."
Professor Koch has had some experi-
ence as an actor, and has worked
with the little theater movement in
the United States. His most notable
success has been achieved at the Uni-
versityy of North Carolina, where, he
is professor of dramatic literature.
Under his tutelage the "Carolina
Playmakers," a college dramatic or-
ganization, has been attracting wide
attention. This group of people
writes, acts, and produces the plays
which are given under Professor
Koch's direction.
In the July, 1921, issue, of -The
Drama Walter Pritchard Eaton fur-
ther states, "Frederick Koch of North
Carolina is doing a wonderful work.
He is teaching young people to write
their own plays, about their own peo-
ple and lives, stage them, costume
them, act them - and then take them
right into the heart of the country
they are concerned .with, and make the
people listen to them and enjoy them.
I would rejoice snore over the one
little play that is written and acted
by men and women in their own en-
vironment, before their own neigh-
bors, provided it is honestly written
and earnestly acted, than I would over
the ninety and nine written by G. B.
Shaw, Augustus Thomas, G. M. Cohan
and William Shakespeare, and sent
out from New York."
DEADLOCK ON BONUS PLAN
Senate Finance Committee May Call
In Democratic Members
Washington, May 25. - Democratic
members of the senate finance con-
mittee may be called into break a
deadlock among the Republicans of
the committee over soldiers' bonus
legislation. The subject was brought
up today at a meeting of the majority
and it developed that there wasa five
to five "division, on the so called M-
Cumber plan - the amended house
bill-and the Smoot proposal to issue
'to service men paid up insurance pol-
icies in lieu of all compensation op-

tions heretofore proposed
Senator McCumber said after the
session 'that he probably would call a
meeting of the committee for this
wee.k.
'ENSIANS MUST BE
CALLED FOR TODAY
Distribution of the 1922 Michigan-'
ensian will close at 4:30 o'clock to-
day, according to a statement of Rob-
ert Wieneke, '22, business manager,
yesterday. More than 340 of the books
have not yet been called for. As the:
Library insists that the sales staff
that is distributing the, Michiganen-
sian withdraw as. soon as possible,
these remaining books must be distri-
buted at once. If these books are not
taken at once they will be distributed
to the large number who have placed
requests that books be sold to them
and who did not get their orders in
soon enough to have a copy ordered.
Distribution will not take place this
morning, but. will continue from 1 to

C N G T M R H -L S I S TFO R 7 T O M O R R O W
ANNUAL EXERCISES MARKING BE-
GINNING OF NEW YEAR HELD
IN EVENING
PLACES RESERVED FOR
STUDENTS IN HOLLOW'

Assembling at 7 o'clock tomorrow
night in front of Hill.auditorium, the
entire student body, led by seniors in
caps and gownls and preceded by the
Varsity band, will march to Sleepy
Hollow, where the traditional Cap
Night' ceremonies will be held. The
line of march will be north on Thayer
street to Ann street and then east to
the hollow. The classes will be lined
up according to seniority ,the fresh-
men in the rear.
On reaching the hollow the fresh-
men will remain on the east side of
the field while the other classes will
take positions frombeast to west in
rank, the seniors being next to the
freshmen. The visitors and towns-
people are requested not to come for-
ward until the students are all seated
In the reserved ground. Red lights
will designate the different sections.
After a few selections by the band
and cheers led by A. L. Cuthbert,
'22E, Angus G. Goetz, '22M, as master
of ceremonies, will introduce Prof.
(Continued on Page Eight)
RA1LLY DEFEATS
MINNESOTA, 84
Four Runs Garnered in Ninth Inning
By Heavy Slugging Ends
Contest -
VICK AND UTERITZ STAR AT t
BAT FOR WOLVERINE NINE
Minneapolis, Minn., May 25.-A ninth
inning rally which netted four runs
enabled Michigan to defeat Minnesota
8 to 4 today. Triples by Wimble and
Captain Vick and singles by Kipke and
Knode after two were out, put the
game away for the Wolverines.
The thrill of the game came in the
fifth frame when Schwedes, Gopher
moundsman hit a home run, said to be
the longest hit ever poled out in Nor-
rup field.
The Gophers hit freely and thoe
(Continued on Page Eight)
GIES STHRN LEA FOR
IDEALS IN MODERN4 LIFE
McLAUGHLI14 ADDRESSES NEW
INITIATES AT PHI BETA KAP-
PA BANQUET
A strong plea, for the maintenance
of national and individual ideals in the
face of a period of general doubt and
pessimism was made by Prof. Andrew
:. McLaughlin, head of the history de-
partment of Chicago university, in his
address at the banquet given last night
tt the Union in honor of the65 mem-
bers ofethis year's senior literary class
initiated into Phi Beta Kappa,honor-
ary scholastie society.
"The only one who can really be-
come pessimistic is the one who gives
up," he declared after presenting evi-
dence of the prevailing pessimism.
This evidence he found in the general
questioning of the efficiency of democ-
racy, in the unheroic character of mod-
ern literature and the cynical attitude
of literary criticism, and in the status
of our educational system.
"Public education is the nmost mon-
umental Job our country ever under-
took, and yet our colleges are filled
with thousands who are not there to
be educated, to the detriment of those
'who have a more serious purpose," he
said.
Citing the Chicago city government
as one example of the ineffectiveness
of our institutions, he declared that
the unofficial citizen who stands by the
right and is willing at all times to be
of service to his community is the
only effective agent for a successful
democracy.

He scored the politial parties for
their attitude on international rela-
tions, and said that they are responsi-
ble for pessimism because they rob
us of belief in -ourselves. "America
'has lived on idealism," he said. "Do
not let any man steal your appreciation

Tilley, Judge
Listed

(By Virginia Tryon)
"When I was very 'young, I went to
art school and learned to draw a
peacock feather and a clover blos-
som. It is from the clover blossom
that I received my love for the out-
doors, and from the peacock feather
that I derived my incurable vanity,"'
this is the delightful way in which'
Vachel Lindsay strove to introduce
himself to his hearers in the last
number of the poet talks in Hill aun.

Thompson, and Brophy
on Program of
Speakers

Lindsay Shows Whimsical Humor
In Talk Here .nding Poet Series

itorium last night.
It is easy to seeI

NET TEAM OFF FOR
Merkel, Reindel, Rorich and Sanchez
Make Up Wolverine Squad
at Chicago
WILL PLAY GOPHERS MONDAY
AND WISCONSIN. ON TUESDAY
Miciigan's tennis team left yester-
day afternoon for Chicago, where it
will take part in the annual Western
Conference Intercollegiate Tennis
tournament in both singles and dqu-
bles. The same four men who repre-
sented Michigan in the East wer se-
lected to go to Chicago' They are
Capt. Charles Merkel, George Rein-
del, Jr., Johann Rorich, and Frederico
Sanchez.
Play in the tournament commences
at 10 o'clock this morning and will run
thropgh Thursday, Friday, and Satur-
day. Winners in both singles and
doubles will be decided. The tourna-
ment is an individual affair and has
no bearing on the Conference tennis
team champion. Such a title is decid-
ed at all must be awarded on the bas-
is of dual team matches.
Several men in the Conference have
a good chance to cop the singles ti-
tle. Norton of Minnesota, Gotfredsen
and Tredwell of Wisconsin, Wirthwein
of Ohio State, Merkel if Michigan, and
others have about equal chances for
the honor. In' the donbles, Michigan
will have two strong teams. Reindel
and Merkel,and Rorich and Sanchez
should make most any other Confer-
ence team step. Tredwell and Got-
fredsen of Wisconsin, Meyers and Du-
bach of Illinois are also good teams.
Following the Conference tourna-
ment, the team will g from Chicago
to Minneapolis for a dual match with
-Minnesota on Monday. -In Norton, the
Bros brothers, and Pidgeon, Minnesota
has a team of' veterans. They have
tied- the strong Wisconsin team and
have other victories' to their credit.
On the way home from Minnesota,
the team will stop off at Madison on
Memorial day and meet the Badgers.
Wisconsin claims one of the best teams
in the Conference. Gotfredson and
Tredwell are a'pair of strong players.
They have been playing together for
several years and with the other two
members of the Wisconsin team about
whom little is known make up a good
.combination. t
On the strength; of_ its excellent
showingagainst the tas in the East,
Michigan will be a slight favorite
over the Badgers and Gophers. Every
man on the squad showed marked im-
provement on the trip. Pittsburg,
Carnegie Tecl, and Cornell were decis.
(Continued on Page Four)
VETERANS PLAN
SMOKER TONIGHT
Gun and Blade club will hold a
smoker tonight at Lane hall, at .which
the two other veteransi organizations,
the Veterans of Foreign Wars, and
the American Legion, will be guests.
In addition, the men who have a'd-
dressed the club at various times'
the course of the year will be guests,
and the following men will deliver
two minute speeches: Dr. D. W. My-
ers, Capt. E. E. Collins, Dr. H. M.
Beebe, Maj. Robert M. Arthur, Dr.
Scott C. Runnels, Dr. Louis P. Hall,
Allan Stanchfield, Prof. F. $. Wahr,
Dr. Arthur Stalker, Dr. James F.
Breakey, Prof. E. C. Goddard, Prof.
Rene Talamon, Dean J. A. Bursley,
Dean W. B. Humphreys, W. H. Bryce,
and Henry W. Douglas, all of Ann Ar-
bor, and Frank Campbell and J. D.
Mehl, of Jackson. The commanders

that the first part

of this statement is true, but it is
hard to see how the last can be ap-
plied to Mr. Lindsay. Charming his
audience at once with his appealing
'personality, he appeared the picture
of 'modesty. .His whimsical humor
which was so apparent throughout
both the poems which he gave and
the running fire of explanation with
which he prefaced each number makes
it impossible that he should be the
least bit vain.
Mr. Lindsay began the evening with
a few remarlis in regard to himself
and his work other than poetic in na-
ture. He haststudied art for years,
both in Chicago and New York, and
it is this which he has always con-
sidered first. The fact that he is
famous for his poetry is almost a sur-
prise to him, In fact, 90 per cent of
his poetry, according to him, was
written originally to illustrate his
drawings.
The interpretive readings which fol-
lowed were chosen from the repre-
sentative moods which he expresses
in his poetry.
In conclusion, Mr. Lindsay gave his
famous, perhaps his best known,
poem, "The Congo." Both the poem
itself and the interpretation were a
fitting climax to the evening's pro-
gram. The music which, Mr. Lindsay
says, must in great measure be "un-
heard melody" is made up of 'vivid
sound cglor.
Mr. Lindsay was forced to come
back for an encore, and with the char-
acteristic words "You needn't bother to
sit down again - this isn't long
enough for that-" he gave a charm-
ing :,little poem called "The Spice
tree," dealing with two lovers un-
derneath the spice-tree and the moon.
CUN CIL ARRANGES
NEWTICKET PLAN,

7
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f
1
t
1
7
3
i
y
3
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1
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Announcement was made yeste
afternoon of the selection of Ge
Little, Miami university football cc
as assistant director of intercolle
athletics and assistant football c
here. He will occupy a positio
general assistant to Coach Fieldin
Yost, who will maintain active lea
ship in the four major sports and
tinue his work on the gridiron in
fall.
Coach Little has had much ex
ence in handling-of athletic teams
has acted in the capacity of direct
intercollegiate athletics this year
head coach in football, basketball
track at Miami for the past t
years. His record with that unive
has been of the best, having won1
conference championships in both
ball and track.
Coached at 0. S. U.
After his graduation from Ohio I
leyan in 1912, at which school C
Little had played football for t
years, he assisted Coaches Wilce
St. John at Ohio State. He atte
the summer school for coaches in
university during the summer of
'and in the fall of that year be(
head coach of football and baskel
and assistant track coach at the
vetrsity of Cincinnati.
After serving two seasons with
cinnati, Coach Little attended the
mer school for coaches at Illinois
then assumed the duties of head c
of football and basketball and as
ant coach of track at Miami. His
year at the Ohio college' was a ren
able success and he succeeded in
ning the Ohio conference football cl
pionship for the first time in the
Cory of the school. In basketball C
Little turned out a team that
Ohio State and that was runner ul
the state championship.
At this time the war intervened
Coach Little entered the first ofli
training camp. He arrived in Fr
June, 1918, and served there at
front with the Seventh division
at, several training schools as insl
tor in infantry tactics. Later he
athletic officer for the Brest base
had charge of the athletic prograr
the area.

Has Had Varied Experlew
ing, Coaching, and T
Athletes

6tLITTLE NAMEI
ASSISTANT CO91
OF FOOTBALL HI
MIAMI UNVERSITY MAN B
FINE RECORD FROM FOU
SCHOOLS
TO ACT UNDER YOST
DIRECTING ALL SPC

Freshmen at
Place

Football Games to Have
in West Cheering
Section

ELECTION COMAITTEE MAKES
FINAL REPORT ON MAY VOTE

Distribution of tickets for nextl
year's football games was the mostt
important' thing discussed' at the
meeting of the Student council held
last night at the Union. All the newt
members were sworn in; at this
meeting and Vernon F. Hillery, '23,
took office as president.
Only a few changes were made int
the arrangements as they were out-<
lined last fall. The freshmen will be
seated in a body in the West stands,
where they will be under the directt
leadership of a cheerleader. No one
else will be permitted to sit in this
stand, the other classes, alumni, andt
guests being seated according to a
regular method whereby each will be
kept separate.
The comm ittee on elections submit-
ted a complete report on the recent'
ball/ing and the method carried out
this year in voting and registering
was considered completely success-j
ful. It is planned, however, that the'
ballot itself shall be considerably1
shortened next year by the elimina-
tion of all offices which do not 'call{
for an All-campus vote. This change
will aid in reducing the time of count-
ing the votes.
W. W. Michaels, '22, Robert Rice,
'23, and Earl H. Lundin, '23A, were"
appointed a committee to look after
the senior section at the baseball
games for the rest of the year. Sen-
iors attending the games are, expected
to wear their caps and gowns and
sit in a body in the section of the
stands marked off for them.
The council as a body gave a vote
of thanks to Angus Goetz, '22M, the
outgoing president, for his services in
that capacity during the past year.
Goetz gave a report to the members
of the recent Mid-West Student Con-
ference at Louisville, Ky., at which
he represented Michigan.
VAUGH AN AWARDED'
HONORARY DEGREE.
Dr. V. C. Vaughan, who for 40 years
was a member of the medical fa~ulty
at Michigan, and who last June re-
signed after 30 years as dean of the
Medical school, has, been voted an
honorary degree by the University of
Missouri. Dr. Vaughan, who at the
present time is in Washington head-

At Miami Since 1919
Coach Little returned to Miami
versity in 1919 as head coach of 1
ball, basketball and baseball, ane
assistant in track. His football I
was runner up for the Ohio confer
championship, and other athletic tE
he coached -last year made credit
showings. The next year he coache
football, basketball and track.
This year Coach Little was na
'director of intercollegiate athl(
and was actively coaching three m
sports. He was able to'win confer
championships in football and t
and his court men ended with a
cessful year.
Coach Little will teach in the
year course in physical education
in the summer school for coaches
in addition to his other duties. He
had wide experiene in teaching
was responsible for the organizE
of the summer coaches' school at
body College for Teachers, Nash'
Tenn., where he was responsible
the whole program of athletics.
Art Exhibit to Continue This '
The Ann Arbor Art association
extended through this week the p
during which the Beneker, Caml
Hoftrup, Walker, Fowler, and
Ewen pictures are being exhibit(
the West gallery, Alumni Meir
hall. The exhibit is open from
5 o'clock every afternoon.
-I

S TO VISIT DAILY
ool editors and faculty
rho are attending the
convention which be-
, will visit the offices
ichigan Daily tonight.
rs will inspect the me-
cuipment of The'Daily,
e given an opportunity
r the newspaper is ed-

of the two visiting
also speak.

organizations willl

No New Diphtheria Cases Reported
No new cases of diphtheria have
been reported during the past few
days, and it is thought by the Univer-
sity Health service that the situation
is well under control. The Schick tests
for determining immunity from the
disease are given from 2 to 4 o'clock

ing the medical branch of the Na-
tional Research council, will not be
able to attend the commencement at
Missouri this June, at which time the
degree was to have been conferred,,
so it has been decided that the date
of the conferring will be postponed
until convocation next fall, when it is
expected Dr. Vaughan will be pres-

I!

SENIOR LIT NOTICE
An important meeting of
senior literary class has
called by Walter B. Rea for
o''clock Thursday afternooi
room 205, Mason hall. An a
ni secretary will be elected
various committees will pr
for discussion their reports
corning Commencement wee
tivities. All senior lits are u
to be present.

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