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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 17, 1922 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-05-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICIGAN DAIL)

I _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ __ _ _..__ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _

U UIMLUIILL 111611.
FOR PLIS
n Present Squad of 45 Mather is
Planning Final Reduction to
25 Players
TEST, MOST EXPERIENCED
CANDIDATES PLAY IINFIELD
ith the end of the regular fresh-
baseball season less than two
ks off, Coach Mather is beginning
make preliminary selections for
last cut which will reduce the
ad to'25 men.
ore. than 45 men have been prac-
ig regularly since the start of the
on. A few have been cut now and
, but the coaches have deemed it
a to keep a large number on the
ad because of the eveness of abil-
displayed by the different aspir-
Are Strong hitters
itting the ball seems to. be the
ng department of the freshman
ers. Their fielding and actions
e under fire have not been asgood
hey might be, the reason for this
g the lack of experience of all
two or5 three upon the squad;
. comparison with last year's
d, the freshman team is not quite
good. At the first of the season
y of them looked much better than
do at the present time. Last
,s squad had a'much longer' prac-
season than the present squad has
which is due to the lack of base-
weather this spring. The men
3 been unable to have any practice
es with any team with the excep-'
of an occasional tilt with the
city, and what the team needs is
es with foreign opposition.
Iufleld Strong
ach Mather has a" fair num ber of
hers this year. They are rather
for college baseball, and besides
handicapped by being inexper-
ed. The pitchers are looking bet-
than they were and ;seem to be
oving with the good weather.
infield is the best department.
men playing the sacks have dis-
day is "" Day.l

played a brand of flashy baseball this
spring and will make a great fight
for the Varsity next year. The outfield
is well supplied with candidates and
seems to be able to wield the bat
with tremendous power. On the whole
the infield has a better rounded ag-
gregation than any other department
of the squad. Their team play in con-
sistent and the positions are being
played by the men who have had the
most experience before coming to
Michigan.
Two Outside Games
Next Saturday the freshmen will
battle the alumni at Ferry field, and
Coach Mather has arranged for a
game with another team for the earl-
ter part of next week. In. these games
the yearlings should show to advant-
age, for these will be the first and
only games with teams other than the
Varsity. Besides the playing of the
men in these tilts will play an import-
ant part in the awarding of the fresh-
man numerals to the deserving mem-
bers of the squad.
FACULTY TENNIS TOURNAMENT
Drawing for the tournament are
as follows:
H. F. Taggart 661-W vs. C. A. Lang-
worthy 2239-M; H. C. Barnett 2019 vs.
Martin ten Hoor, 369-M; E. H. Cham-
berlin 661-W, vs. G. L. Michaud,
274-J; L. W. Faust (Univ. Hosp.
2534-W) vs. W. B. Anderson 2381-W;
K. W. Guenther 1823-3 vs. M. Clavel
274-3; H. W. Grant 941-3 vs. W. C.
Rufus 2308-M; E. G. Burrows 2303-M
vs. 0. J. Peterson; A. J. Jobin (bye).
Players are urged to communicate
with each other promptly so as to
end the first round before Saturday,
May 20. Results are to be reputed to
C. A. Langworthy or G. L. Michaud.
FRESHMEN, NOTICE
All. freshmen interested in try-
ing out for assistant intramural
managers report at the intra-
mural office, Press building, at
once.
ncWILLIAM H. MERNER,
Intramural Manager.
Watch for the "N's." Today Is "N"
Day.

STANFORD LOOMS,
STRONG IN TRACK.

Ties California, Last Year Winner
Eastern Intercollegiate in
Great Meet

of

TWO PACIFIC COAST TEAMS
TO BATTLE EASTERN FORCES
(By-.Wallace F. Elliott)
Special Correspondent
San Francisco, May 15. - In the
spring of 1921 there' existed in the
Middle West and the East a smug,
complacency borne of the supposedly
indubitable superiority of collegiate
track teams in those sections over
anything the far West or South could
produce. Then, at the Harvard in-
tercollegiates 11 men representing the
University of California proceeded, in
typical California style, to upset the
frijoles by adding the national track
championship to the honors already
held in football.,
Picks Stanford to -Win
This is the spring of 1922, and soon
the battle for the national cinder path
title will once more be waged on the
Harvard field. The eyes of the East,
now focused on the California aggre-
gation, hold a look of expectancy, and,
perhaps, one of hope that an Eastern
team, or even one from the Middle
West, Cornell or Illinois for example,
will bring back the proverbial bacon
to the eastern side of the Rockies. It
is quite possible, even probable, that
the track men of the Golden Bear will
be forced to cede the honors they so
nobly won last year, but Pacific Coast
fans are predicting with the utmost
confidence that the national title will
remain near the shores of San Fran-
cisco Bay, not, however, in Bruin
hands, for there has appeared, almost
out of the impossible, a new contend-
er, a team that has been built up out
of seemingly nothing in a few brief
months into what may be the country's
greatest, a team that wears the Car-
dinal of Stanford university.
Stanford Beats Bears
On April 22 some 20,000 persons
jammed their way into the California

track bleachers to witness the triumph
of the all powerful Blue and Gold ag-
gregation over the little known men
of Stanford. California was predicted
to win Py from 10 to 30 points. The
story of that meet has become track
history. In nearly every event the
dope fell with a resounding crash.
Time after time the red "s" appeared
where none looked for it, California's
victory in the relay bringing to a
close the greatest of collegiate track'
meets, with the score a tie.
Have Brilliant Performers
Here, again, are a few of the rea-
sons for the confidence of the Paci-
fic Coast in the new found ability of
the Stanfordites. First, Glenn Tiny
Hartranft, who throws the discus well
over 145 feet, who puts the 16 pound
shot just a fraction over 50 feet and,
as a side line, runs the 100 in 10
flat. Second, Blink Williamson, who
shakes a mean 440, and who has gone
the distance in better than 50 sec-
onds. Third, Lane Falk, hurdler, who
tears off the high sticks in better than
15 and the low in a trifle over 24.
Fourth, the sprint pair, Kirksey and
Sudden, both 9 4-5 men in the 100 and
equally efficient in the 220. Fifth,
Mint Howell, to whom 6 'feet in the
high jump is just a starter. Sixth, the
greatest pair of pole vaulters that
ever wore the colors of the same col-
lege at the same time, Wilcox and
Black. Their limit is about 12 feet
9 inches, but it seldom takes much
more than that to win anywhere. Sev-
enth, Capt. Flint Hanner, of javelin
fame, who hurls the elongated wand
quite a bit over 200 feet with surpris-
ing regularity, and who has yet' to
. 9' ' r

meet his match. Eighth, the rest of
the team, which consists of some good
second and third placers in the short
distance and field events, and a couple
gf mediocre mile and two mile run-
ners, mediocre, yet imbued with the
fighting spirit that is making the.
name of Stanford feared wherever
track men are gathered preparing for
the biggest meet of the year.
Four Teams Favored
The victor should be either Cornell,
Illinois, California, or Stanford, but
when the teams await the first pistol
shot at Cambridge on May 27 it is a
safe bet that there will be a goodly
number who will give the wearers of
the Cardinal the shading In their
preference. One thing is certain.
With a galaxy of performers such as
Stanford presents they are, at least
worthy of the attention they have re-

ceived, and worthy of the remark that
is so often heard in training quarters
these days - "Look out for Stan-
ford!"
SCHEDULE OF GAMES
BASEBALL
At Home
May 27-Chicago at Ann Arbor,
May 29-Wisconsin at Ann Arbor.
June 3-Ohio State at Ann Arbor.
June 16-Alumni game at Ann Ar-
bor.
June 17-National Collegiate Athlet-
ic association meets at Chicago.
Abroad
May 20-Illinois at Urbana, Ill.
May 22-Iowa at Iowa City, Iowa.
May 30-Notre Dame at South Bend,
Ind.
Today is "M" Day.

t

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.+....r

Straws

I

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ADRIAN-ANN ARBOR BUS
SCHEDUL1, I'FFECTIVE OCT. to, 1921 t
Read Down Central Standard Time
A.M. P.M. P.M. A&PM U
Daily Daily Daily Daily *
7:30 z:3oLv.. Adrian ...Ar. .o0 12:45
8:05 2:45 ....Tecumseh ....1:25 12:10
8:25 2:25'......Clinton......1:o5 z:5. U
9:15 3:15......Saline ....... :5 1z:oo *
A-4 ^4 - ^Ar. AnnArbor*Lv* 4:49 ioA*
Read Up
SUNDAYS AND HOLIDAYS

POCKET BILLIARDS i
Fourteen tables on second
floor reserved exclusively
for this sociable game.
You need not be an ex.
pert to enjoy it.
BILEAR t rCIARS CANDIES
PIPES LUNCUES SODAS
NWe try to trea t youiht'

as low as
$2.50

,o

with our usual quality

THIS
BLUMN ,
LOSES
3 P.M.

FIETHIS
COLUMN
A D V E R T IS N 3CLOSE 3
A DVERTISING AT 3 P.M.

I

P.M.
3:30
4:05
4:25
P.M.

Lv... Adrian ...Ar.
.... Tecumseh ....
... Clinton.....
.Saline...
Ar. Ann Arbor Lvr.

P.M.
9 :oo
8:25
8:os
6:4.5
P.M,

a

WAGNER & CO.

II

4 : . . .

FOR SALE
R SALE-For first best offer, one
4 plate Nelson Static machine, one
ombination Galvanic, Faradic, Su-
nsaidat, "Kidder Make," one operat-
ng chair either Harvard or Allisan,
ne Geneva test case. Good open-
ig for Physician, good opening for
ruggist. Address A. N. Shotwell,
I. D., 46 Macomb St., Mt. Clemens,
[ichigan. 162-7
R SALE- Brick house, 12' large
ooms, oak finish, lot 132x150 feet;
ear campus and street car lines,
uit, flowers, shrubbery. Suitable
or fraternity, sorority or hospital.
hone 1411-R. 1136 Prospect St.
165-3
R SALE-Two choice May Festival
ckets, seats 5 M, 8 and 10, main
oor, $6.00 each. Call 418-W or
847-W. 165
R SALE-Complete 'set of drums.
eedy snare and bass, with standard
quipment. Almost new. Box W.
., Daily. 165-2
R SALE--One May Festival ticket
i center of main floor. Call 1452-R'
fternoons or evenings. 164-2
R SALE-Five seats for May Fes-
val, Wed. night; two seats Thurs.
ight. Phone 2338. 164-2
I SALE-One $7 Festival Course
oket. Excellent seat. Call 1505
etween 12 and 1 and 6 and7. 165
t SALE-Two May Festival course
ckets, second balcony. Phone
ill-M. Good seats. 165
1 SALE-Two patrons tickets for
ednesday and Thursday night
ncerts. Call 2361-R. . 165
I SALE-May Festival ticket for
itire course or first floor. Call
76-R. . 165-2
t SALE-May Festival ticket, sec-
d balcony, row E. Phone 71-,.
165
SALE-One May Festival course
,ket, first balcony. Call 2236-W.
164-21
LOST

MISCELLANEOUS
WOULD YOU LIKE to know how
much money you can make this
summer? I had fifty students from
Ann Arbor out during spring vaca-
tion and their commissionis ran all
the way from $40 to $112. Come in
and look over the reports and see
what some of your friends have
made. Those that come in early
will have their choice of territory.
All requests must be in by May 20th.
H. J. Leader; 232 Nickels' Arcade.
Tel. 600-M. 161-21
IF YOU CANNOT afford to take
chances with this summer's profits
be sure to investigate the new pro-
position of the largest brush com-
pany in the world. Come and see us,
2 to 5 and 7 to 9 p. m. Fuller Brush
Co., 301 First National Bank Bldg.
Phone 2849-R.' 165
MOTHERS-Mrs. A. C. Garnett, train-
ed kindergartner, will care for chil-
dren afternoons and evenings this
week at her home, 806 E. Kingsley.
Phone 806-W. 165
TYPEWRITING - Compositions or
notgs. Reasonable price. Satisfac-
tion guaranteed. 433 S. Division.
Phone 1708-.. _165-2
MANUSCRIPTS accurately typewrit-
ten by experienced typist. Biddle's
Book Store, 11 Nickel's Arcade.
155-21
WANTED
WANTED -- For resort, experienced
cooks, student waiters, boys or girls,
laundress, chore boy and dish wash-
ers. Good wages, fare one way and
bonus if you stay the season. Call
at 445 E. University afternoons or
evenings. Ask for Mrs. Yerex. 164-2
WANTED-A large corporation will
employ a number of students this
summer in various lines of work.
State age, experience, and salary
expected. Box R. S., Daily. 165
WANTED-Six room house, for rent
unfurnished, with at least one year
lease. Call 1034-R. 164-3

on'Tiauuaiaiws'q

For Men

Since 1848

I U III

TOO MUCH
.U&I NESS

t

MATINEE 2:00 3:30
ADULTS 25c
KIDDIES'

EVENING
ADULTS
loc

7:00 8:45
3 5c

LAST TIME TODAY

The

Earl De Biggers
wrote it

Greatest
Laughter
Special,

TULLY MARSHALL
and an ALL-STAR CAST
MUCH-

If

"TOO

Fate
Slips You

BUINIYESS"
A travesty on American business
made into a seben reel
Laughter Special.

SINCE THAT

SUPREME TRIUMPH
"A CONNECTICUT

A Lemon
USE IT TO OPEN
A F ruit
Stand

UNIVERSAL CENTURY
COMEDY

PATHE
NEWS

I

YANKEE"

Pictures Of MICHIGAMUA INITIATION

STARTING TOMORROW

MARIE PREVOST

WANTED-Care of children by day
or hour. 1321 Volland. Phone
1511-M. 165

I

IN

r
G_
4
:,;,

A

)r

-Gfold fountain pen, with name WANTED-To buy a canoe with or
rnduff. Finder please call 1325. without equipment. Box W. N.,
ird. 165-2 Daily. 165-2
FOR RENT WANTED-Second hand Ford at once.
.tENT-Whole upstairs, for 12 Call at 207 S. Ingalls. Phone 1808-M.
next year. One block from 165-2
us. Also room for summer. WANTED-Portable typewriter. Rem.-
Y. E. M., Mich. Daily. 164-2 ington preferred. Call 740-J. 164-2

"The Dangerous

Little,

Demon"

I

I *-

4 11

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