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May 13, 1922 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-05-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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TEAM LEAVES
110 STATE GAME

ntinued from Page One)
the Buckeye captain and star
ian, is the mainstay of the
.s year but the Wolverines
r had no trouble in walloping
ings while the Michigan hurl-
already chalked up two vic-
er the Ohio nine. Marts, who
wn the receiving job is one of
hitters on the team and his
of foul flys makes him one of
catchers in the Big Ten.
at first base is one of the
ots on the nine. He hits with
nsistency but is very erratic
ield. Matusoff is one of the
pendables. 'He is a steady
nd a sure fielder around the
sack. He has a crack -run-
,te in the other second base
, Fesler. This man playing
hort field position is a sure
nd has a wing which cuts out
pposing infield hits. Volk at
corner is another man with
arm for throwing. Volk is
iconsistent at hitting but his
around third, base makes hin
le asset to the team.
tree outfielders are the slug-
Opening.
% w IIA 1=-1

gers on the nine. Shaw in center,
Bauman in left and Slaman in right
make a trio of hitters which will
rank with any in the Big Ten. Shaw
leads off the lineup for Ohio while
Fesler bats in the clean-up position.
Besides Cotter the Buckeyes have an-
other good pitcher in Dudley. He
seems toi have pitched in hard luck
this season and has not been able to
get away to a good start. These men
are waiting for a chance to wipe out
the stain of the two diefeats last
year at the hands of the Wolverines
and should give the Varsity a fast
game this afternoon.
Yesterday's Gam es
American League
Philadelphia 4, St. Louis 13.
Cleveland .4, Washington 5.
Chicago 0, Boston 5.
New York 10, Detroit 8.
National League
Philadelphia 7, Chicago 4.
Boston 3, Pittsburg 5.
New York 6, St. Louis 7.
Brooklyn 6, Cincinnati 7.

FRESHMAN TRAKTEAM
SHOWING IMPROVEMENT
WAR WEATHER AIDS YEARLINGS
IN PREPARING FOR ILLINI
MEET
Archie Hahn put the freshman
tracksters through their paces yester-
day afternoon at Ferry field and the
results showed that the men have
been improving with the warm
weather.
Hubbard did the 100 yard dash in
10:1 and is looked upon to do it in
10 fiat at the telegraphic meet with
the freshman team of the University
of Illinois. His distance for the broad
jump was 23 feet 9 1-2 inches.
Hindes put the shot 38 feet 6 inches
and threw the hammer 128 feet 9
inches, which is 5 feet better than his
last attempt. Out of six attempts with
the discus Brooker managed to heave
it 121 feet. $
Have Good Quarter Miler l
Hulse, Maloney, and Whitman ran a
fast 220 yard dash with Hulse coming
in first at 22:1. In the 440 yard dash
Roeser had the best time with 52:3.
Gowan and Gibson pressed him close
all the way.
Amstutz Regaining Form1
Amstutz was down for a trial two
mile run but the coach thought it best
to cut a half mile off the distance in
order that Amstutz would not be over-
taken by another pain in the side.
Amstutz was beaten in by Shenefield
and although his side did not bother
him it was evident that he was some-
what weaker than.formerly.
RIDER'S for PENS.-Adv.

RETURN TO ROWING GAME
DIFFICULT FOR BADGERS5
WITH AN INEXPERiENCED CREW
WILL NOT ENTER POUGH-
KEEPSIE REGATTA
(By Associated Press)
Madison, Wis., May 12.-The return
of rowing to its former place among
major sports at the University of
Wisconsin is proving to be a slow
process, with the problem of develop-
ing oarsmen out of inexperienced col-
lege students, paramount.
When university authorities last
year removed the ban from intercol-
legiate rowing, imposed in 1914 after
the school clinic held the sport in-
jurious to the health of the athletes,
Coach H. E. Vail predicted that it
would be several years before he
could again have such a crew as in
1914 took second place at the Pough-
keepsie regatta. Coach Vail's task of
training oarsmen from students most
of whom had never seen a shell be-
fore their first trip on Lake Mendota,
has raised serious difficulties, which
have been increased through ineli-
gibility of some of the best men.
Have Practiced Several Weeks
This year the Badger eight, how-
ever, is expected to ' be in shape to
give strong competition to its oppon-
ents. They have been on the lake for
several weeks getting in shape for the
long pulls which must be made in
later races. Three veterans from the
first varsity crew of last year are
among the eight oarsmen who will
represent Wisconsin. Captain Toep-
fer is pulling stroke, with C. S. Pues-
tow and G. C. Turner the other ex-
perienced men. Coach Vail has devel-

oped C. D. Newcomb, E. M. Plettner,
R. J. Schuetz, E. H. Crozier and H. E.
Johnson, from his freshman squad of
last year and from new material of
the present season, for places in the
varsity berths.
Meet Manitoba May 27
He is working to get his regulars in'
shape for the meet with the University
of Manitoba on Lake Mendota, May
27. The Canadian oarsmen are com-
ing to this country for the first time.
and it is expected will make the meet
with the Badgers an annual event.
During the second week in June the
University of Washington crew is ex-
pected to row Wisconsin on their way
to Poughkeepsie regatta. Tentative
arrangements for the contest already
have been made by T. E. Jones, di-
rector of athletics at Wisconsin.
Will Not Go East
Coach Vail will not take his men to
the eastern meet this year. He be-
lieves that before the Badgers again
enter this regatta, the premier crew
event of the country, they must have
a group of oarsmen developed to the
point that the former crews were de-
veloped. This, he points out, will re-
quire several years of training.
Sport Calendar

i
i
i
i

INDEPENDENT BASEBALL
MANAGERS

Each independent baseball
manager is requested to come to
the intramural office today or
Monday to check over the results
of the games in which his team
has participated.

BASEBALL
At Home
May 17-M. A. C. at Ann Xrbor.
May 27-Chicago at Ann Arbor.
May 29-Wisconsin at Ann Arbor.
June 3-Ohio State at Ann Arbor.
June 16-Alumni game at Ann Ar-
bor.
June 17-National Collegiate Athlet-
ic association meets at Chicago.
Abroad
May 13-Ohio State at Columbus,

GIVE 1ILLINI EDGE IN
TODAYS TRCKMEET
(Continued from Page One)
Wharton, who will probably run in
the two mile for the Suckers, is an-
other record holder. He broke the
Conference record for the two mile
in the Indoor meet this year. He is
known to be capable of the eight loops
in 9 minutes and 30 seconds. Michigan
will again place Chute, Whittemore
and Harry Davis in this event.
Sargent Best Hurdle Entry
The hurdles are expected to be in-
teresting events. The visitors will
have Wallace, while Sargent will most
likely star in taking the sticks for the
Wolverines.
Osborne, who holds the record of
6 feet and 6 inches in the high jump,
uses a very erratic form of jumping
and therefore there are chances that
McEllven who has proven to be Mich-
igan's best in crossing the bar this
year may be able to beat him. The
other men who willq perform for Mich-
igan will be Neisch and Smith.
Landowski will be forced to give
his best to win the pole vault-event.
In the Penn Relays the midget aviator
was off form because of illness, but it
is to be hoped that he will stage a
strong comeback this afternoon. The
visitors have a man who tied Merrick
of Wisconsin last week with the bar
at 12 feet and 3 inches.
Osborne of the Illini squad is also
a good broad jumper and is known'to
be able to stay in the air long enough
to cover 22 feet.
Both Weak in Weights
Both teams are weak in all the field
events except the javelin throw. The
visitors have Angier in this event, who
is known to carry a national cham-
pionship in his belt. He heaved the.
quill for a mark of 192 feet in the
Wisconsin meet last Saturday, so
Hoffman will be forced to break an-
other record in order to beat him.
Stipe is Michigan's best man in the
hammer throw and shot put. Hun-
ter, Dunne and De Ruiter will heave
the discus for the Wolverines.
Programs will be given out at the
field announcing the schedule of
events for the meet and the men en-
tered in each event.
FRESHMEN, NOTICE
2 - All freshmen Interested in try-
ing out for assistant intramural
managers report at the intra-
mural office, Press building, at
once.
WILLIAM H. MERNER,
Intramural Manager.

at the
IM HOTEL
npler's Lake

1'
.I

SDAY EVENINCG
Ray 16th
SFie
!w Fischer

1~1~t~_
MICHIGAN MEN WANTED
To sell the retail trade a completE
line of seasonable neckties. Pleasant,
profitable, summer and spare timE
work. The man who meets our re-
quirements, will be his own "boss'.
and the m nufacturer's direct repre-
sentative. :irect selling means lower
prices to the retailer and larger com-
missions to our men. Write us brief-
ly. about:
Yourself;
Territory you prefer;
When you can start.
AMERICAN WEBBING
COMPA NY
Department 19, Neckwear~
PROVIDENCE, RHODE ISLAND
Successful men will be offered similar
all-year spare time work.

t

Ohio.
May
May
May

20-Illinois at Urbana, Ill.
22-Iowa at Iowa City, Iowa.
30-Notre Dame at South Bend,

I have a very attractive investment that will net you
12% per annum. Can be taken in units of $500
or in total amount up to $33,000. It will stand the
closest investigation by your attorney or banker. In-
terest payable monthly and principal up to amount
of $2,000 can be called on 30-day notice. Above
that amount 60-day notice required.
Address BOX C, NO. 186, Michigan Daily.

i.

Ind.
TRACK
At Home.
May 13-Illinois at Ann Arbor.
May 26-27- Michigan interscholastic
at Ann Arbor.
Abroad
May 20-Chicago at Chicago.
June 2-3 - Western Conference
championships at Iowa City, Iowa.
June 17-National Collegite Athletic
association meet at Chicago.

is popular Orchestra
7ll furnish Music
Everybody Invited
-ill i WaI. v ''I A

II

II I* I vyir u ax iuc
also Tuesday,May 23rd;
Good Music
- - o

TENNIS
At Home
22-Northwestern

i

at Ann Ar-

STARTING SUNDAY

. May
bor.
May
May
burg.

Abroad
15-Pittsburg at Pittsburg.
16-Carnegie Tech at Pitts-

"TOO MUCH BUSINESS"

(Continued on Page Eight)

THE GREATEST LAUGHTER SPECIAL SINCE
"A CONNECTICUT YANKEE"

- - - _ _

MATINEE: 2:00 - 3:80
ADULTS ...........20c
KIDDIES .........10c

} . 6

EVENING: 7:00 - 8:30
ADULTS ........... 80c
KIDDIES ........... 10c

r.
;
,
:
. f

FACULTY, NOTICX

Enough faculty men have al-
ready entered the faculty horse-
shoe tournament to make it a
success. If any 'mtre wish to
enter they must turn in their
names today to the intramural
office. Phone 2268.

I

LAST

TIME

TODAY

SIR GALAHAD GOT AWAY WITH IT -

Extra Credits,
During
Summer V~acation
You can continue your ad-
vancement scholastically this
summer without foregoing the
desired change and recreation
that summer should bring.
You will be refreshed and developed,
physically and mentally, through
attendance this summer at

But, See What Happened to

NOTICE
If you've decided to sell this
summer vacation consider these
Fuller Facts:
1. We are eight times larger
than our nearest competitor.
2. We buy 85% of all raw ma-
terial.
3. We rank eighth in volume
of American advertising.
4. Our students stay with us
year after year.
Sp'Look Us Up. 301 Nat'l B'nk Bldg.
FULLER BRUSH CO,

Civalrous

Chariie

TOO MUCHt
BU, sI\~esj
Fa

IV

THERE ARE A THOUSAND WAYS OF GET-
TING INTO TROUBLE AND 999 OF THEM
ARE WOMEN --- and Charley Reilly Knew
Them All!

l
r
'
.
F
'_ i

:5z

SUMMER
N aU SESSION
On the WOODED SHORE
OF LAKE MICHIGAN
Come to Evanston, the beauty spot
of Northern Illinois. Boat, swim, plate
tennis, enjoy concerts,' dramatic perform-
ances and inspiring lectures. Earn credits
toward College. Professional, or Advanced
degrees. Faculty includes teachers of note
from other leading institutions.
Summer Session includes the following schools:
Graduate School School of Journalism
College of Liberal Arts Law School
School of Commerce School of Music
School of Education School of Speech
Courses covering full year's work in General
Chemistry, Physics, or Zoology for students
entering Medicine, Dentistry or Engineering.
School of Commerce offers courses, i
"Salesmanship," "Factory Management,"
"Insurance," etc. School 'of Journalism
features practical newspaper work.
Many courses supplemented by tripe
toledin inustialand financial
centers of Chicago, close by.
THIS BOOKLET
NOW READY
Clip Following Handy
Request Form
PLEASE SEND TODAYj
booklet describing in full the courses of NORTH-
SRN UNIVERSITY Summer Session and
I other advantages, recreational and educational.
Name -
ar : . ... , .. ... ... ... - . . ..- ..- - -
Address WALTER DILL Scour, President
Northwestern University
604 University Hall EVANSTON, ILL.

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CAROM BTT LIARDS Ii

PATHE NEWS

SNUB POLLARD IN "KILL THE NERVE"

i Eilgh t e en tables on
ground floor for this most
popular recreation.
You are missing part
of the pleasure of college
life if you do not make use
of them regularly.
~h
BU.JLIARDS CIGARS CANDIES
PIPES LUNCHES SODAS
"'We try to treat you right"
- - - - - - a -

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- I 7f

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