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May 07, 1922 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-05-07

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iDAY AND N14
SERVI

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ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN SUNDAY, MAY 7, 1922

PRICE FI

1 s

DORMITORY PLAN

ASSUR

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i

BALL TRACK TEAMS
ND SLAM BY DEFEATING
ITE AND HAWKEYE SQUADS

10 bIA

[GHTH CONSECUTIVE
BUNCHING HITS
N THIRD
D ICK PLAY
ITS IN VICTORY

Three Hits,.
ives in Three
ely Hitting

f
One

Michigan's baseball team annexed
eighth consecutive victory on Fer-
field yesterday afternoon when the
Iverines 'defeated, Iowa by a 5-1
re.
'he game was fast, both teams get-
g men on .bases in almost every
ing but with the- exception of a
ne run by Hicks, the Iowans could
get thir m'en past second. Ernie
k and Dixon were the stars of the
ne Ernie, by his excellent fielding
hitting which drove in three of the
[ze and Blue runs an'1 Dixon 'by
ding the Hawkeyes to three hits
I one free pass during the nine in-
gs.
Mieigan Hits Hard '
lichigan had little trouble in knock-
the offerings of Becker all over
field and consequently he had
ted only four innings when he was'
laced by Frohwein. This pitcher
med to, have the mieasure of the
rverines finishing ' the game . and
lding only one hit. However, Mich-
n scored enough in the early part
he game to retain her laurels.
'he Varsity^ started its scoring in
second Inning and garnered three
s before the side was retired.
ckleford opened the frame by go-
to first on, an error by Shimek.
>ke sacriflce'd him to second and
per who followed was safe at first
en his grounder was played on
ackleford. Shack, however, beat
ball to third and l ichigan had men
first and third withlope out. Ernie
k then doubled to right sco'ring
lchleford and Paper. Dixon struck
and Uterits ended the inning by
unding ogt to the pitcher.
Dlin Scores
Wchigan scored again in the foirt
en with two out Paper singled and
k duplicated the feat scgving Paper
:s w s the third rn for which Vick
e responsible. The final Wolverine
re came in the seventh frame. Dix-
sigled and advanced to second on'
error by the Hawkeye short field
n Wimbles' grounder.. -Inde flied
and Shackleford followed with a
under to Hicks. The third base-
,attempnted to make the play on
pl'lep at second but threw wild and
:p scored. Iipke then made the
I et by fdying to gen~r deld.
Towai His 0!uey
gwa scored their only run in the
Xe inning when Hicks opened by
ting the ball over Klein's head fqr
erne rn. The next three me were
led in rdev,.
i4ou w s in perfect form ietting
HE wkey s dowll with only two
er hit besideS the fo ir hser.. Bqth
§e ca4 in the ame innixg, the
rth. With one dni n frohweiu singl-
"u4 Locfie doubled to left. roh-
i tried t core pn the hit bua '
tuyo v to Vic i~ipped him at the
te..
l asgow P laces
Third In Contest
ulius B. Glasgow, '23, won third
ce for Michigan in the thirty-sec-
I annual Northern Oratorical lea-
e contest, held Friday night at Ur-
La, Ill., under the 'auspices of the
iversity of Illinois. The judges
arded decisions as follows: North-
stern first, Minnesota second, Mich-
n third, Illinois fogrth, Wiasconsi
h, an Iow sixb. -
arty meets hae been bette bal-
g4, but last night's wa interet-
au4 veried, stated Prof. T. p.
1elIppg the publc speakinlg de-
t nf upon hi return f 'on Urh-
r eda afternoppl. "Mr. Glasgow
rev spqke be$ter; every Michigan
g shuld be prou of his showing.
Sfirst thrpe gen were bunche4
d4eq y away from th others."

CINDER MEN RUN UP 89 1-3 TO
45 23 SCORE BY BRILLIANT
WORK IN ALL EVENTS
HOFFMAN REAKS FIELD
RECORI) WITH JAVELIN
Moorehead, of Ohio, Ties Conference
Record in 220 But Time Will
Not Be Accepted
Winning all points in two events
and scoring points in all events,the
Michigan track team downed the Ohio
State squad at FeFry field yesterday
afternoon to the tuneof 89 1-3 to 45
2-3. Ferry field records were broken
in the Javelinthrow and tied in the
220 yard dash. These records, how-
ever, will not be allowed because of
the strong wind which , prevailed
throughout the entire meet. .
oorehead Wins 100
Moorehead, of Ohio, won the 100
yard dash in -10 seconds flat. He was
followed by Lock, of Ohio, and Burke,
of Michigan. He also Avon the 220
yard dash in 21 3-5, whch ties Archie
Hahn's Conference record. Simmons
and Burke, of Michigan, followed him
in the order named. In the half-mile
run Douglas and Price, of the Wol-
verines, took first and second and
Gurney, of the Buckeyes, took third.
In the mile run Bowen ran one of
the best races of the day. He took
the lead on the last lap and easily
drew away from the field. His time
was 4:32 3-5. F~erguson, of Ohio, fin-
'ished second and Hattendorf, of Mich-
igan, took third in this event. Wikoff,
of Ohio, won the two mile race with
Davis and Chute, of Michigan, taking
second and thifd. Davis led until the
last straightaway when Wikoff passed
hnm 'by a wonderful spring.
Fast time was made in both hur-
dle events. Sargent took the 120 yard
high hurdles in 15 2-5 seconds.
Schmtz, of .Michigan, followed hin
and Green, of Ohio, took third. Mc-
Creary, of the visitr§,,topped the 220
yard low hurdles in the fast time of
24 seconds flat. Sargent and Shmitz,;
of Michigan, took second and third,
Michigan took all points in the pole
vault and javelin throw, In the for-
mer event Landowsk, Naylor, and
Smith tied for first. This ws at the
height of 10 feet 6 iches, Landowski
later tried for the iFerry field record
but was unsuccessfl due to the
strogwind.. e rdid succeed, how-
,evr, with the bhar at "th@ _1 ot
mark. In the javelin throw Hogm a
took fist, jndoawski scopn4 an
Dunne thid. Thedistane as 12
feet 8 inphes. This is 8 inches. better
than the Ferry field record.
Michigan Wins High Jump
White, of Ohio, took first in the
hammer throw and tipe and Schmidt,
of MWichigan, took second and third.
The distance' was 121 feet 1 itoh. In
the shot put White also took first.
Stipe and Heath made second and
third in this event. White made 41
feet 11, inches. Hunter copped the
disus eyent with a throw of 114 feet
9 1- inches. punne was second and
heard woii a pjint for Ohioby taking
thi d.
Mc3l11vei. and smIth tie for first
place in the high jlimdp and Neisch, of
Michigan, ad hear and Shidep ker,
of Q. $. U., tie4 fgr third. The height
was 5 feet 1Q ij che. Shmidt and
W\eisch, Af the W lverinea, took first
am4 seon4 in the broad Jump and
Moorehead copped third. The distance
was 01 feet 7 1-4 inches,
"LITTLE LORD FWNTLEBIOY
TO BE SHOWN MAY 8, 9, 10, 11
"Little Lord Fauntlproy," a movie
starring Mary Pickford, "The High
Road' ;'and "Foot Follies" will, be
shown May 8, 9, 10, 11, both after-
noons and evenings, at the Wugrt
theater for the peneit o $he . .
C. A. girls' emp fupd.
Procees of a l the tick4es e:cept
those old ft the bo Qifce will go
toward the camp fund. The girW°
camp, which ie lated at Oaanaugh
lake, is being bought by the girls'
club of the city by inakilg two yearly

paymnents.
Wlseonsin Beats IllaIoIs, 4 1
Madison, Wis., May 8. - Hard h
ting by 7]lliott, Wisconsin's shortstop,
which "included two home runs and a
two bagger, was largely Pesponsible
for the Badgers 4 to 1 victory over

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wilbe bil:a: a os oa$00,0 r ech

MICHIGAN GOLFERS DEFEAT
0. S. U. TEAM AT COLUMBUS
(Speciai to The' Daily)
Columbus, May 6.-- Michigan
defeated Ohio State, 15 to 3,.in
the golf match between the two
schools today. Michigan wo'n
three individual matches and
both foursomes. Drizzling rain in
the morning and a heavy gale in
the afternoon prevented low med-
al scores. Winters, Michigan,
was low man. with 81. Duschel,
0. S. U was second with 83.
Steketee, Loeb, and smith, .ich-
igan, each .scored 86..

FIRST OF TEN $100,000 BUILDING.S
READY FOR OCGUPANCY NEXT FALL
ALUMNI ORGANIZATION RESPONSl

i
i

,

Tug-of-War Friday Afternoon, Obsta-
ale Race Saturday
Morning ,
CLASS PEP MEETS SET
FOR MIDDLE OF WEE
.Plans for the annual Spring games'
which include the tug-of-war next
Friday afternoon and the obstacle
race and rope contest Saturday morn-
ing have been completed. All under-
classmen are eligible to try out for
positions on their class teams.r
Must Weigh In
"Weighing in" for all sophomores
and freshmen who desire to partici-
pate in the tug-of-war will be held
Tuesday and Wednesday at a place
to be announced in Tuesday's Daily.
The tug-of-war will take place Fri-
day afternoon. Each class will have
three teams of 50 men each, which
will be known as the heavyweight,
middleweight, and lightweight- teams.
The lightweight squad will consist of
ien weighing less than 135 pounds;
,middiewetght, between 1.35 and 160
pounds; and heavyweight, .more than
160. As there will probably be more
than 50 men trying out for each
team, it has been decided to select
the 50 heaviest tryouts .in each class.
Precantions will be tke'n by offi-
iais to- insure tha only evenly1
matched teams participate, and. that
the sophomores refraA from tying
their rope around a tree, or greasing
it, as has happened in the past.
Classes Will Meet
Sophoinorts will have a pep meet-
ing at 7:30 o'clock.Wednesday in Hi1
auditorium. Freshmen will meet
Thursday at a place to be announced
later. T. P. Banks, '23, W. W. Mich-
aels, '22, R. F. Adams, '23, and T. J.
Lynch, '2E, who are in charge of the
games, will direct the meetings, giv-
ing the necessary instructions to
classes and their captains and lieu-
tenants,
Partieipants Excused
All sophomores and freshmen will
be excused from Saturday classes to
attend the obstacle race and rope ty-1
ing contest. Both classes will assem-
ble on Ferry field at 10 o'clock. Each
contestant in the obstacle race will
climb a 10-foot wall and crawl through
a barrel carrylng his class banner.
Bach man in the rope-tying contest
will be gIven two two and a half-foot
lengths of rope to tie an opponent's
hansd and feet within 10 minutes.
The number of points to be award-
ed the winner of eachcontest will be
announced later.
Studebaker Dealers Hold Meeting4
More than 500 dealers in Studebaker
automobile' attended a state conven-
tion last week t the Tuller hotel in
Detpoit'a t ylich it was estimated that
they would need more than $2,000,000
wort of cars for the month of May
To confirm their good intentions, the
dealers, bought more than $200,000
worth of these cars before leaving the
convefition, -
Kalamazoo Reunion Postponed
Because so many of the former stu-
dents of Kalamazoo oollege were un-
'ale to attend the reunion of alumni
and former students which was to be
,held last evening at 1816 East Wash-
ington street was postponed& to some
future date. No definite day has been
set but it will be within the next two
weeks.

BOOSTERS WIND UP!
ACTIVITIES MONDAY'

,, t

I

President Burton -and Ty Cobb
. Widely Diversified List
of SpeakersF

one

SENIORS TO NOMINATE MEN
FOR MEMBERSHIP NEXT YEAR
Michigan's Booster club will hold
its last and largest meeting of the
year tomorrow night at the Union to
discuss the work of the past year and
evolve plans for the future of the or-
ganization. More than 300 Boosters
from the student body, from tie town
people, and from the alumni are ex-
pected to be present.
The speeches will be short and to
the point and will be followed by en-
tertainment in the form of music,
and by vocal solos by James J. John-
son, '24. All committee chairmen of
the organization will make short con-
cise reports of their work and senior
boosters will make nominations for
new men to be taken into the organ-
ization next year.
President Marion L. Burton, the
speaker of the evening, will deliver
his message to every Michigan Boos-
ter and advise them in what way their
efforts can be directed to bring the
best results to the University. He will
be followed by Willie Heston, '05L,
who will tell, "What the, Undergrad-
uate Means to the Alumnus."
Prof. Ralph Aigler, advisor of .the
B6osters, will be the chairman of the
meeting, and another of the speakers
will be Ty Cobb, of the Detroit Tig-
ers. -He will talk on "Sportsmanship
In and Out of College," showing the
relation of athletic ethics to every day
life.
Robert Clancy, '03L, will talk on
"What the Alumni Think of the Mich-
igan Boosters," and George Burke,
representing the townspeople, will
have for his subject, "The Townspeo-
ple and the Booster Movement." Wil-
Fred Shaw,''05, has chosen, ""Boosting~
the University," for his subject. n
SENIOR IRLS TO PLAY
QUAINT ENGLISH QOMEOY
"Pomander Walk," the play to be
presented by senior girls at 8:15
o'clock Thursday night at the Whit-
ney theater, is a delightful English
comedy designed to "Lead you far
away from all the turmoils of the
busy day," according to the prologue.
jThe scene of the play is aid in P-
mander Walk, which at. the time of
the play, 1805, was a charming quaint
little crescent of six red-brick hous-
es, close to the Thames, wit a beau-
tiful view across the river. The
houses were oecupied by gentlefolk in
reduced circumstances. This fairy-
like nook had grown mellow with
age. The houses were minatur-e cop-
ies of the town mansions of Queen
Anne's day. In front of the crescent
of tiny houses lay an admirably kept
lawn. In the center of this lawn
stood an ancient elm-tree, and near
this tree was the Gazebo, a most con-
venient nook with a rustic bench
shaded by a well-trimed boxwood
hedge.
In this quiet, peaceful, half-forgot-
ten spot the story of the play runs
its course. It has to do with Sir
(Continued on Page Twelve)'
Watcli for canes today._

WISHART T ALKS TONIGHT
AT UIIERS TY SERVICE'
LECTURER, ,AUTHOR, TRAVELER
. TO ADDRESS MICHIGAN
STUDENTS
" .t
Rev. Alfred Wsley Wishart, au-
thor, social service lecturer, foreign
traveler, active Y. M. C. A. worker, and
at present the pastor of the Fountain
Street Baptist church of Grand Rap-
ids, will deliver the regular Univer-
sity Services lecture on "The Funda-
mentals of the Faith" at 7:30 o'clock
tomorrow night in Hill auditorium.,
After graduating from Colgate uni-'
versity with the Bachelor of Arts de-
gree in 1889, Dr. Wishart took a post
graduate course in the UTniversity of
Qhicago, becoming a fellow in church
history in that university, in which
capacity he served from 1893 until
1895. He was ordained a Baptist
minister upon his graduation from
Colgate unfversity in 1889, and die
rectly became the pastor of the Sec-
ond Baptist 'church at Troy, N. Y.
Here he served until he received his
fellowship from the University of
Chicago. From 1895 until 1906 Dr.
Wishart was pastor of the Central
Baptist church'at Trenton, N. 3. He
left this position to become the pastor
of the Fountain Street Baptist church
at Grand Rapids, which position he
has held until th'e present.
He organized the first "Civic Reviv-
al" in '1900 at Trenton, N. J., and also
founded, an anti-bribery society in the
state. He was editor of the Trenton
Times from 1901 until 1903. He has
served as secretary of tie Michigan
State Peace Community, and as a
member of the social service commu-
nity. He was also a member of the
Northern Baptist convention.
His best knoavn books are: "A Short
History of Monks and Monastaries,"
and "Primary Facts in Religious.
Thought."r
CO-OP BOOSTERS TO MEET
Will Effect Organization at Union
Thursday Afternoon
So much interest has been express-
ed in the proposed Co-operative store
that a meeting for organization is to
be held at the Union at 4:30 o'clock
Thursday, May 11,in the upper read-
ing room. At this meeting any ap-
proved changes in the plan, for the
store, as published in The Daily, will
be made. . One of the changes, for ex-
ample, may be to increase the maxi-
mum number of shares allowed any
one person from 10 to 20 or even 25.
Also it has 'been suggested that a
sinking fund might be provided for
eventual redemption of the stock.
Promoters of the enterprise are
hoping that at the opening of the
meeting subscriptions to the stock in
considerable amount can be announc-
ed. Such subscriptions, of course, if
made now, would be only provisional
on a satisfactory organization being.
accomplished.,
With this understanding subscrip-
tions - at $10 each for not more than
25 shares -- may be made out and
should be mailed at once., Address
Alfred H; Lloyd, 1735 Washtenaw
avenue.'

DORMITORIES CORPORATION i
CONDUCT ENTERPRISE 0
BUSINESS BASIS
EACH UNIT DESIGNED
TO CARE FOR 100
Will Have Proctors Quarters, D
Hall, and Individual Rooms
for Students
Construction ofI10 r more :
000 dormitories fo men, the fir
which will be ready for 'use b)
opening 'of the University next
is the goal of the Dormitories Co
ration, which is being orkanize
Michigan alumni. The organiz
headed by C. H. Mooney, '97, De
as general chairman, and lion.
L. Barbo.r, '65L, hpnorary chair
is practically coznplete 'nd has e
lished headquarters, in 'the Li
.building, Detroit.
Will Sell Stock ,
The plan is to incorporate,
$1,000,000 capital; and 'construct i
dormitories here on a business 1
selling preferred ,aid common s
the controlling interest to be p
with the Alumni assboiation of
University of Michigan.*
Mr. Mooney, who was in Ann I
Friday looking over possible site
the -new buildings, stated that
men backg the scheme hoped
build at least 10 units, each capal:
accommodating . 100 students ,a
have the first completed by Oct
While no definite site has as yet
agreed upon, a location will prol
be picked which will allow the
arate -nits t face on a con
court.
Plans for the buildings were d
up by Architect Rupert Koch ci
troit, while Mr. Mooney worked
plan for financing the project.
Dormitories Corporation is the Sr
of the latter's effort. Ten thot
shares of preferred 'stock, par v
$100, and 20,000 shares of eon
stock will be issued. One-half o
common stock 'will be trusted
the Alumni association so that it
have the voting control in the ci
ration.
Alumni Directing Work
The active work on the new'pr
is being carried on at present b
executive committee, which is
posed as follows: H. F. Benntt,
J. H. O'Hara, '15, Fred D. Grleen
Joseph L. Hepburn, '91L, Rev.
Rabb, '00, Edwin S. Bartlett, '98L,
W. Bennett, '85L, Herbert L. Ru
'93E and Dr. Wesley E. Taylor,
An advisory committee compos
50 prominent alumni has been oi
ized and will lend its moral suj
Wilfred B. Shaw; '05, has been
chairman of the organization coil
tee, a committee which will be
posed of men prominent in UnivE
affairs throughout the country.
G. Goebel, '23E, heads the under
uate committee, while Mayo I
has been named chairman of the
Arbor cittens' committee.
Buildings Not Official
The University is in no way of
1y connected with the work, as
being conducted as a private bus
enterprise, offering seven per ce
terest on its' preferred stock.
plan was selected because of the
ization that alumni have alread
nated to many worthy causes, and
considered a more reasonable m
of financing the' project in the b
Wing. The, income fomi the re
it is believed, will be sufcient to
care of the maintenace, pay int
on the' investment and create a
ing 'fund.
The dormitories will be of the
modern fire proof construction,
in units accommodating approris
ly 100 students aid costing a
$1,000 per student .for erection.
building will each contain two r
set aside for proctors, quarters fa
overseer, and a dining room in
tion to the rooms rented to the
dent body. Each room will be e
ped with a bed, dressr, built
closet, a study table and comfor

chairs. Each floor will have a s
of showers.
THE .AIL

There will be a
,nn,.nn. of all nPn

e

Seniors carry canes

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