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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 04, 1922 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-05-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

CONCERTS '1
d under the directions of Strauss
music festival at Eisenach,
21, 1890, and met with the en-
stic reception which - it has al-
since received. Strauss' indebt-
to Wagner and Liszt is appar-
broughout the work, but there
>.present much that is beyond
the product of originality and
"Progra m" Translated
:ander Ritter, an intimate
of Strauss, has written the
am" of the tone poem, which
to F. Apthorp has translated as

Seise

/

the Sense family, are
ites of

ii

.eat

follows for the program book of the
Boston Symphony orchestra:
"In the necessitous little room,
dimly lighted by only a candle-end,
lies the sick man on his bed. But
just now he has wrestled despairingly
with -death. Now he has sunk ex-
hausted into sleep, and thou hearest
only the soft ticking of the' clock on
the wall of the room whose awful
silence gives a foreboding of the near-
ness of death. Over the sick man's
pale features plays a sad smile.
Dreams he, on the boundary of life, ox
the golden time of childhood?
"But Death does not long grant,
sleep and dreams to his victims..
Cruelly he shakes him awake and the
fight begins afresh. Will to live, and
the power of Death! What frightful
wrestling! Neither bears off the vic-
tory and all istsilent once more.
Sunk back tired of battle,, sleep-,
less, as in fever-frenzy, the sick man
now sees his life pass before his inner
eye, trait for trait and scene by
scene. First the morning red of
childhood shining bright in pure inno-
cence. Then the youth's saucier
playing and trying his strength-till
he ripens to the man's fight, and now
burns with hot lust after the higher
prizes of life. The one high purpose
[tchat has led him through life was to
shape all he transfigured into a still.
more transfigured form.aCold and
sneering, the w orld sets. barrier upon
barrier in the way of his achieve-
ment. If he thinks himself near his
goal, a 'Halt' thunders in his ear.
'Make the barrier thy stirrup! Ever
higher and onward go!' And so he
pushes forward, so he climbs, desists
not from his sacred purpose. What
he has ever sought with his heart's
deepest yearning, he still seeks in his
death-sweat, Seek-alas! and finds
never. Whether he comprehends it
more clearly or that it grows upon
him more gradually he can yet never
exhaust it sannot complete it in spirit.
Then clangs the last stroke of Death's
iron hammer, breaks the earrthly body
in twain, covers the eye with the night
of death.
"But the heavenly spaces sound
mightily to greet him what he yearn-
ingly sought for here, deliverance
from the world, transfiguration of the
w"orld."
Strauss' place in the musical Pan-
theon is difficult to assign. He has
devout admirers who insist that he is
a towering genius anid areformer on
the same plane as W'agner. His num-
erous enemies refuse to concede that
he has more than extraordinary tech-
nical cleverness, and denounce his
many harmonic innovations and what
they call his overwrought, sesational
style. After all has been said, how-
ever, Strauss remains the most spon-
taneous and effective composer who
has essayed orchestral music since the
death of Wagner, Brahms and Tschai-
Ikowsky.

l+R l

-
SENIOR ENSINEERS PLAN
ANNUAL "STEP" MAY 1
SPECIAL FAVORS TO MARK FOR-
MAL DABCE IN UNION
DINING HALL
While the Freshmen ate frolicing
in the ballroom of the Union May 12,
the senior engineers will hold their
'22E annual step in the dining room.
of the same building. The commit-
tee in charge of the affair reports
that 130 tickets have been sold to date
and that there are 20 remaining to
be sold to the campus. s
Bottles of perfume with sterling
silver cases with the initials '22E, en-

graved on. them 'will be given to the
ladies as' favors. The chaperones 'for
the dance, Dean Wm. H. Butts and
Mrs. Butts, Prof. Alfred H. Lovell
and Mrs, Lovell, and Prof. Horace W.
Ki'ng and DMrs. King have already
been invited.
The dance will last from 9 to 1
o'clock and will be a summer formal.
No stags will be admitted. George
Rogers' orchestra has been obtained
to furnish the music.
Those desing to obtain tickets,
which will cost $6, may do so by
telephoning E. S. Bradley, '22E,
chairman of the committee in charge.
The suggestion has been made that
all students desirous of spending less
money buy meal ucicets at the Arcade
Cafeteria. They'll save 8 to 10 per
cent.-Adv.

Coming
"ToI'abli

Last Ti n
Tom

YOUR LAST CH ANCE TONIGHT
TO SEE THE PICTURE THAT HAS Al
ANN ARBOR TALKING
An intriguing romance of Yanktee Pep and Spanish I

"FATHER

t - 100 per
elimination of

cent.
other

Never produces "that
help, instead of an ob-

, the training table of
. college in this country'
Niagara Falls, N. Y.

ROBERT Z. LEONARD
.presents
THE DRAMA OF A GIRL WHO
DARED EXPOSE HER BEAUTY
IN THE MOST NOTORIOUS RE-
SORT IN SPAIN.
REGULAR PRICES I.A DED-

p

PERCY AND FERDIE

S IOWING

MA TIN EE:
EVENING:

" FROM SOUP TO

:00 - :0
7:00ll - x~ 2i/y. :0

Featuring 'SID SMITH
uA IA

LATENT NE W11

- COMING!C
)RDINARY
JESSE L LASKY - PRESENTS
SON
RGDOLP$ VAETN
aaamound cuie
NQ SU",AY
- SPECIAL SCORE

FRIDAY - SATURDAY

i,.

May Festival Visitors Engage Roonll
Although the May Festival will not
begin Yor two weeks, practically all
the rooms available in Ann Arbor
have been engaged for the four days
of its duration. While a few of the
hotels still have some rooms that
have not been taken, the Union is
completely sold out.
Students who have investigated de-
clare that there is a variety of foods
served at the Arcade Cafeteria un-
equalled anywhere else in town.-Adv.

:';

II I

s Theatre 5-6
HIAN UNION

I,
i '

fli~

'day, May

ARE FOR THE GENERAL PUBLIC, AS WELL AS FOR
MEMBERS OF THE UNIVERSITY
ES REPERTOIRE COMPANY
PRESENT

,
r
L :; ,
'//
.
n. *
.ray ~ S wf
r
a
t
t

he SleenW le",
tilrPictreslkP eret :.

13th

CHAIR"

By
BAYARD VEIRIN.
of Thrills and Conedy. A Play that has Stood the Test for Four
yrs. The Best Drama olf Its Kind Ever Written.
E1 PRODUCTION EXACTLY AS PRESENTED IN NEW
BOSTON, CHICAGO, PHILADELPHIA, ETC.
'S IN "MIMES" PRODUCTIONS ALL CHARAC-
RS ARE PLAYED BY MEN STUDENTS
,S NOW - Send check and self-addressed stamped envelope.
SEATS RESERVED -PRICE $1.00.
SEATING CAPACITY LIMITED TO 500

Straight from the protecting walls of a convent she came - into a world of trick-
ery and deceit. And when they discovered her in a rotter's room at midnight-
even her sweetheart believed her a thief.
Then came th, breath-taking climax and the amazing revelaton that set things
right.
The star who always pleases, in a love drama of thrills and charm. A picture
for the whole family to see.

Added-

" FA L SE A LA R M"

A Riot of

COMING SUNDAY
ATTRACTION EXTRAORDINARY

THURSDAY, MAY 4,

AT 10:00 A. M.

___NT E

RODOLPH L "BEYOND
VALENTINO' THE ROCKS"5
VA LENTINOSTORY BY ELINOR GLYN
THE MOST GORGEOUS LOVE DRAMA .

GL(

STUDENT THEATRE IN AMERICA
N1TS IN EVERY DEPARTMENT

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